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Country - Released June 26, 2020 | New West Records

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Corb Lund coined the term "Agricultural Tragic" to describe his idiosyncratic brand of country, but the odd thing about the Canadian troubadour's tenth album is that it doesn't feel as if it belongs to rural provinces. From the moment the record snaps to attention with "90 Seconds of Your Time," it's clear that Agricultural has a modernist bent; it's as steeped in the guitar pop of the '60s as it is in the open plains of America. Lund still can't help romanticizing the West, leading his band into a dreamy waltz so he can salute the great author "Louis L'Amour," and he still spends a fair amount of time essaying a deep-rooted country-rock, but the album is defined by its humor and swagger. That spirit fuels the cool-rolling blues of "Old Men," the riotous duet with Jaida Dreyer on "I Think You Oughta Try Whiskey," the Bakersfield twang of "Ranchin', Ridin', Romance (Two Outta Three Ain't Bad)," the frenetic "Rat Patrol," and the spoken-word closer "Tattoos Blues," which veers toward absurdity. All of these cuts are loose, clever, and inspired, and they make for one of Lund's liveliest records. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released September 13, 2019 | New West Records

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Country - Released August 28, 2012 | New West Records

Canadian cowboys are less about flash and brag than getting the job done -- check out the Calgary Stampede sometime -- and Canadian cowpunks are often the same way, especially Corb Lund. Lund's music fuses a strong classic Western sound with a darkly witty rock & roll sensibility, and Lund plays both sides of the fence with style and heart on his seventh studio album, Cabin Fever. "Getting' Down On the Mountain" kicks the album off in idiosyncratic fashion, spinning a rough-hewn tale of living off the land in the wake of some global apocalypse, and while the album never gets quite that grim again, his drinking songs speak of genuine heartache (especially the harrowing closer "Pour ‘Em Kinda Strong"), and even when the tunes are funny, they often have a wicked edge, in particular "Priceless Antique Pistol Shoots Startled Owner." And while some rockers sound like they're play acting when they make like cowboys, Lund always seems like the real thing, discussing the joys of cattle ownership on "Cows Around," pining for a city girl while looking after the ranch on "September," and offering the sage advice "(You Ain't a Cowboy) If You Ain't Been Bucked Off." Lund's rock & roll moves are more felt than heard --- most of this sounds like stripped-down variant of classic 1950s honky tonk -- but his tales of too-fast motorcycles and hot rockin' gals prove the heart of a rocker co-exists with the soul of a cowboy (in true rocker's fashion, he also passes along some worthwhile advice about life on the road in "Bible On the Dash"), and the dry, lonesome twang of the six-strings and the steel mesh beautifully with his rich, emotive, but unfussy vocals. Cabin Fever is tough without sounding callous, heartfelt without being melodramatic, and true and straightforward enough that plenty of rock and country acts could learn a lot from it, and if you like roots rock with the emphasis on roots, this should be right up your alley. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Released July 1, 2014 | New West Records

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In his native Canada, Southern Alberta songwriter Corb Lund has a pair of Gold records and has won 12 Juno awards. On Counterfeit Blues, his eighth studio offering -- and third for New West -- Lund and his Hurtin' Albertans dig through their early Canadian catalog to offer a twist on the greatest-hits record. They re-recorded well-known cuts from 2002's Five Dollar Bill and 2006's Hair in My Eyes Like a Highland Steer over two nights, absolutely live from the floor without overdubs at Memphis' Sun Studios. It's essentially a soundtrack to a CMT special that sought to flesh out Lund's desire to capture his brand of country in as raw and organic a form as possible. The band -- lead guitarist Grant Siemens, upright bassist Kurt Ciesla, and drummer Brady Valgardson -- deliver a kinetic, tightrope-without-a-net walking set where new versions stand in stark contrast to originals. Lund has written dozens of fine country and cowboy songs from the agrarian perspective he knows from experience. The title track is transformed into a distorted, chugging slide-guitar-rocking blues that evokes the greasy spirit of Memphis and discloses a debt to Bob Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues." Siemens' slide-guitar wrangling bleeds right through the drums and bass, which in turn bleed into Lund's vocal. There's just enough slapback reverb on his voice to keep it above the din. The stomping delivery of "Good Copenhagen" suggests just how deep its outlaw country roots go, without posturing. "Big Butch Bass Bull Fiddle" weds rockabilly's immediacy to Western swing; it's driven by Ciesla's fingerpopping, syncopated slap-groove. The cut-time "Hair in My Eyes Like a Highland Steer," with its spooky guitar reverb and Valgardson's skittering snare, walks a wily path between swaggering hardcore honky tonk and drunken square dance calling. Siemens' killer lap steel playing underscores "Little Foothills Heaven" and "(Gonna) Shine Up My Boots," while "Buckin' Horse Rider" is a slow cowboy waltz. "Truck Got Stuck" is a talking blues that simultaneously recalls the spirits of Woody Guthrie, Hank Snow, and Dave Dudley. Closer "Truth Comes Out" is high, wide, and lonesome. Rich in poetic detail and atmosphere, it feels like a storm coming in from the horizon. It presents the harsh realities of ranchers and farmers living on the Canadian prairies. For those who come to Lund's work through his previous New West dates, Counterfeit Blues is a rough-hewn, hardcore country revelation. For those who've followed him from the beginning, these versions argue that they were always meant to be presented in this way, and that they endure with deeper, wider meanings in this context. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2005 | Corb Lund

The second collaboration with Nashville producer Harry Stinson following their 2002 breakthrough, Five Dollar Bill, Hair in My Eyes Like a Highland Steer is the fourth studio release from Canadian country act Corb Lund & the Hurtin' Albertans. Featuring guest vocals from Western icon Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Canadian singer/songwriter Tim Hus, and folk legend Ian Tyson, it includes the singles "The Truck Got Stuck," "Counterfeiters' Blues," "The Truth Comes Out," and the title track. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2007 | Corb Lund

Featuring their trademark authentic and gritty style of barroom country music, Horse Soldier! Horse Soldier! is the fifth studio album from Canadian singer/songwriter Corb Lund and his backing band, the Hurtin' Albertans. Produced by Harry Stinson, the antiwar-themed follow-up to Hair in My Eyes Like a Highland Steer features the singles "Family Reunion," "Hard on Equipment (Tool for the Job)," "I Wanna Be in the Cavalry," and the title track, alongside a cover version of "My Saddle Horse Has Died," previously recorded by Lund's former band, the Smalls. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Country - Released October 9, 2015 | New West Records

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Canadian country songwriter Corb Lund made a left turn on 2014's Counterfeit Blues with a twist on a greatest-hits album: He and his Hurtin' Albertans revisited catalog tracks by re-cutting them live at Sun Studio in Memphis. It was a half-rockabilly boogie and half-honky tonk stage burner. Things That Can't Be Undone is a return to new material, and a more logical extension of his Juno-winning 2012 set Cabin Fever. Working in Nashville with producer Dave Cobb (Sturgill Simpson), these ten songs combine Lund's rambling, Canadian frontier cowboy take on country with Cobb's modern sonic vision of it. Opener "Weight of the Gun" updates both Merle Haggard's "Mama Tried" and Steve Earle's "Devil's Right Hand." The lyric and melody are pure country, but the musical arrangement comes straight out of the early Northern Soul playbook. The fit is seamless; the production underscores the poignancy in the lyric. "Run This Town" is a stellar, busted love song. Retro in feel, it's bathed in warm, reverbed pedal steel and lead guitar, strummed acoustics, brushed snares, and Kristen Rogers' gorgeous harmony vocals. Choogling razor-wire rockabilly drives "Alt Berliner Blues." Its metaphorical narrative takes on U.S-style capitalist expansion after the Cold War without a bit of preachiness. "Alice Eyes" is an intimate, sad love song, co-written with Austin, Texas' Jason Eady. A Beatles riff is the fuel for "Sadr City" and Cobb delivers production magic to the most devastating song on the set. Lund's words juxtapose the view of a haunted vet against a melody fueled by a jangly guitar hook, strummed and spacy pedal steel, and shuffling snare. Layers of reverb effects assert instruments at unexpected times, adding even more heft to particular lines. "Washed-Up Rock Star Factory Blues" is a darkly humorous indictment of the music business in grooving trucker honky tonk and offers a lyrical nod to David Allan Coe's "Take This Job and Shove It." The cut-time 2-step "Goodbye Colorado" sonically recalls the outlaw Nashville sound of the '70s, but that feel is offset by Lund's road-weary lyrics. "Talk Too Much" is a swaggering, snarling rockabilly blues with stinging guitars, skittering snare, a fingerpopping refrain, and an instrumental chord bridge that sounds like a mid-'60s British rave-up. The pairing of Lund and Cobb on Things That Can't Be Undone is a feather in both their caps; as an album, it forges a new path in country music, yet remains exceptionally close to the tradition's heart. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Released February 7, 2020 | New West Records

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Country - Released March 4, 2020 | New West Records

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Country - Released May 13, 2020 | New West Records

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Country - Released August 28, 2012 | New West Records

Canadian cowboys are less about flash and brag than getting the job done -- check out the Calgary Stampede sometime -- and Canadian cowpunks are often the same way, especially Corb Lund. Lund's music fuses a strong classic Western sound with a darkly witty rock & roll sensibility, and Lund plays both sides of the fence with style and heart on his seventh studio album, Cabin Fever. "Getting' Down On the Mountain" kicks the album off in idiosyncratic fashion, spinning a rough-hewn tale of living off the land in the wake of some global apocalypse, and while the album never gets quite that grim again, his drinking songs speak of genuine heartache (especially the harrowing closer "Pour ‘Em Kinda Strong"), and even when the tunes are funny, they often have a wicked edge, in particular "Priceless Antique Pistol Shoots Startled Owner." And while some rockers sound like they're play acting when they make like cowboys, Lund always seems like the real thing, discussing the joys of cattle ownership on "Cows Around," pining for a city girl while looking after the ranch on "September," and offering the sage advice "(You Ain't a Cowboy) If You Ain't Been Bucked Off." Lund's rock & roll moves are more felt than heard --- most of this sounds like stripped-down variant of classic 1950s honky tonk -- but his tales of too-fast motorcycles and hot rockin' gals prove the heart of a rocker co-exists with the soul of a cowboy (in true rocker's fashion, he also passes along some worthwhile advice about life on the road in "Bible On the Dash"), and the dry, lonesome twang of the six-strings and the steel mesh beautifully with his rich, emotive, but unfussy vocals. Cabin Fever is tough without sounding callous, heartfelt without being melodramatic, and true and straightforward enough that plenty of rock and country acts could learn a lot from it, and if you like roots rock with the emphasis on roots, this should be right up your alley. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Released August 16, 2019 | New West Records

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Country - Released December 17, 2009 | RGK Entertainment Group, Inc.

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Country - Released June 17, 2020 | New West Records

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Country - Released April 3, 2020 | New West Records

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Country - Released August 21, 2015 | New West Records

Country - Released August 28, 2012 | New West Records

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Canadian cowboys are less about flash and brag than getting the job done -- check out the Calgary Stampede sometime -- and Canadian cowpunks are often the same way, especially Corb Lund. Lund's music fuses a strong classic Western sound with a darkly witty rock & roll sensibility, and Lund plays both sides of the fence with style and heart on his seventh studio album, Cabin Fever. "Getting' Down On the Mountain" kicks the album off in idiosyncratic fashion, spinning a rough-hewn tale of living off the land in the wake of some global apocalypse, and while the album never gets quite that grim again, his drinking songs speak of genuine heartache (especially the harrowing closer "Pour ‘Em Kinda Strong"), and even when the tunes are funny, they often have a wicked edge, in particular "Priceless Antique Pistol Shoots Startled Owner." And while some rockers sound like they're play acting when they make like cowboys, Lund always seems like the real thing, discussing the joys of cattle ownership on "Cows Around," pining for a city girl while looking after the ranch on "September," and offering the sage advice "(You Ain't a Cowboy) If You Ain't Been Bucked Off." Lund's rock & roll moves are more felt than heard --- most of this sounds like stripped-down variant of classic 1950s honky tonk -- but his tales of too-fast motorcycles and hot rockin' gals prove the heart of a rocker co-exists with the soul of a cowboy (in true rocker's fashion, he also passes along some worthwhile advice about life on the road in "Bible On the Dash"), and the dry, lonesome twang of the six-strings and the steel mesh beautifully with his rich, emotive, but unfussy vocals. Cabin Fever is tough without sounding callous, heartfelt without being melodramatic, and true and straightforward enough that plenty of rock and country acts could learn a lot from it, and if you like roots rock with the emphasis on roots, this should be right up your alley. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Released September 29, 2009 | New West Records

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Country - Released July 1, 2014 | New West Records

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Country - Released July 19, 2019 | New West Records

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