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Classical - Released September 3, 2013 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2013 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released February 24, 2015 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
The Second Book of Madrigals of Carlo Gesualdo provides the focal point for the latest in La Compagnia del Madrigale’s stunning reappraisals of the glories of the Italian madrigal on Glossa. Probably written by Gesualdo between the time of the double honour killing of his first wife and her lover and his subsequent remarriage, the second book presents a sophisticated compositional mastery quite in keeping with the later books, albeit offering a calmer and gentler approach compared to the more tortured and twisted musical and psychological turns found in the last books. Notwithstanding, much is required from the singers on the Secondo libro di madrigali a cinque voci and La Compagnia del Madrigale bring their muchpraised sensitivity to the text, balance of ensemble and dynamic control. In the booklet, both Marco Bizzarini and Giuseppe Maletto investigate the state of mind of this fascinating composer, over four centuries since his death. The substantial second part to this recording offers a set of contrasts with Book 2: nine tracks devoted to madrigalists inspired by Gesualdo’s style, from contemporaries in Nenna, Macque and Palazzotto Tagliavia to the later Sigismondo d’India. A veritable bonus! © Glossa
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Classical - Released April 14, 2017 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Qobuzissime - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The Vespers for the Blessed Virgin by Monteverdi – Vespro della Beata Vergine – is, so to speak, a work made up of many works. The composer seems to have put everything he had into this piece, which appeared in Venice in 1610. It is as if he wanted to use it as an immense catalogue of all his skills: his facility with ancient and modern styles; with the strict and the flamboyant; with instrumentals, vocals, choruses, solos, parody masses, the magnificat, psalms... Perhaps he wanted to use the work as a CV in Venice, where he would indeed land a job as choirmaster in 1613? The fact that several passages are written for two choirs would seem to support this idea. Elaborate job application or not, in this work Monteverdi has produced one of his most durable masterpieces, which forms a bridge between the late Renaissance - with passages taken from prima practica, the style developed by Palestrina - and the nascent Baroque style, and its seconda practica which was so dear to Monteverdi, and which would free the use of dissonance from its old straitjacket. For this recording, Giuseppe Maletto has brought together the rich talents of La Compagnia del Madrigale and the Cantica Symphonia and La Pifarescha ensembles, because it takes a whole lot of talent to give the Vespers the treatment it deserves.
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Secular Vocal Music - Released October 28, 2016 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released March 25, 2016 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released March 4, 2014 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Exceptional Sound Recording
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Secular Vocal Music - Released January 4, 2019 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
With Vieni, dolce Imeneo, La Compagnia del Madrigale make another important halt on their compelling journey across the territory of Italian secular song with a disc devoted to one of the most significant, yet these days somewhat bypassed, composers: Cipriano de Rore. De Rore was a Fleming who enjoyed great success notably in the Italian courts of Ferrara and Parma – but with a prestige which extended up and across Europe. He composed in many genres, but it is the secular madrigal – recorded here – where his skill was most valued, for example in creating extended and expressive melodic lines coupled with innovatory pre-echoes of the “seconda pratica” so triumphantly expressed – albeit amidst great criticism – by Claudio Monteverdi. Recordings – all also on Glossa – of madrigals by Marenzio, Gesualdo and Monteverdi have already demonstrated musical pleasures such as an uncommon vocal blend and delicacy, and a meticulous dynamic control exhibited by the richly experienced members of La Compagnia del Madrigale, and those delights are to be experienced with these 19 madrigals by Cipriano de Rore, composed late in his career. With texts by Petrarch, Ariosto and assorted court poets for these madrigals, essay-writer Marco Bizzarini highlights one of the principal characteristic features of de Rore’s mastery when he points to the disc’s title track, Vieni, dolce Imeneo: the ideal union between poetry and music. © Glossa
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Classical - Released August 25, 2011 | Arcana

Booklet
Italian ensemble La Compagnia del Madrigale tackles this lengthy work with a wall of sound and beautiful, closely set voices. These madrigals form a song cycle that is primarily based on the third edition of the poem "Orlando Furioso," but the overall work is still a patchwork of a variety of authors, as well as Ariosto's own insertions and reworkings. There is an emphasis of the music and of smooth, lyrical, legato singing over the text (possibly partly the result of the recording). Their voices blend beautifully, which is a clear sign that the right musicians have found each other and chosen the right repertoire for themselves. However, one feels that the singers need to get more into the emotion of the text, which would bring out the diction more clearly: one can hear this from the beginning track of the album, "Le donne, i cavalier, l'arme, gli amori." This is certainly a point for debate, for while Orlando is most certainly not 19th century opera with its emphasis on strong, individual emotion, there is a certain energy that needs to be brought out more fully. That is, La Compagnia needs to get more into the meaning of the text and into the dynamic contrasts. When there is energy, such as in the very up-tempo "Non tanto il bel palazzo," it is engaging to the listener, for the voices play and intertwine in a showcase of what is best about music from this period. Throughout the album, it is easiest to follow the text in the highest soprano line, so perhaps the ensemble has made a musical decision to emphasize the treble. La Compagnia usually takes the repeats in the music, which therefore emphasizes certain phrases or themes. Certainly, the ensemble sings quite well in synchronicity, as one can hear the voices die out together in "Queste non son più lagrime che fuore" (the Tromboncino version) and enter beautifully, as in, "Chi salirà per me, madonna, in cielo." The music of Orlando just seems to evolve and unfold; unfortunately, it tends to sound alike and lacks in distinctive moods or necessary characters for each madrigal. La Compagnia is certainly a talented ensemble. It may simply need to capitalize on the second word of the title, "furioso," to bring more vigor into such a brave performance of this masterwork. © TiVo