Similar artists

Albums

$12.99

Rock - Released June 21, 2019 | Fuzze-Flex Records

All the stars align for Collective Soul on Blood, at least as far as the calendar is concerned. It's their tenth album released in the wake of the 25th anniversary of their 1994 breakthrough, the kind of landmark that only a veteran band gets to claim. At this point in their career, Collective Soul are acting like veterans, playing music that builds upon their older work, music that ignores the present day by going deeper into the familiar. Even if Blood offers the kind of densely saturated melodies and hooks that are Collective Soul's trademarks, it doesn't feel like a throwback, nor does it seem like a nostalgia trip. Leader Ed Roland decorates his surging rockers and ballads with some light, stylish flair in the margins -- they usually arrive in the form of polished electronic accents -- and, more importantly, he still sings with passion. His energy and resolve enliven songs that deliberately follow conventional contours -- songs designed to evoke certain sounds and emotions, from both Collective Soul's peak in the alt-rock '90s and the '70s album rock that is their perennial inspiration. If the sounds on Blood aren't precisely new, they're nevertheless sturdy, the work of craftsman who know their trade and are comfortable relying on their skills. It's the kind of album delivered by a confident veteran act, then: solid and strong, lacking in frills but satisfying all the same. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$14.99
$12.99

Rock - Released December 8, 2017 | Suretone Records

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

Rock - Released October 2, 2015 | Concord Vanguard

Hi-Res Booklet
It's hard not to see the title of See What You Started by Continuing as a bit of a jab at Collective Soul themselves. Twenty-two years and nine albums deep into their career, the alt-rock-era band has neither burned out nor faded away -- they've merely persisted, putting out records at a steady clip that only slowed in the 2010s, when they took six years to succeed 2009's Collective Soul with this record. The delay may have been the result of some lineup rejiggering -- they have a different drummer in Johnny Rabb, and Jesse Triplett takes over the group's historically unsteady position of lead guitarist -- and the new members invigorate Ed and Dean Roland to return to their heavy, hooky roots. Most of the record pulsates to a fuzzy, primal beat, the lightness coming from the harmonies and melodies, the very things that have always been Collective Soul's ace in the hole. Sometimes, they shake things up with a few old tricks -- the horns on "Am I Getting Through," a hint of gospel on "Without Me," a stately power ballad on "Memoirs of 2005" -- but the record is front-loaded with the kind of riffy rockers that always made the group a pleasure. Maybe it's a mere continuation, not a revival, but this heavy dose of straight-ahead hard rock makes See What You Started by Continuing one of Collective Soul's best records yet. [See What You Started was released digitally and on CD.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Rock - Released November 16, 2004 | El Music Group

Well, this is a weird one. Collective Soul parted ways with their longtime record label, Atlantic, following the release of the 2001 hits collection 7even Year Itch, and it took them three years to deliver a new album, which meant there was a gap of four years separating their last proper studio album, 2000's Blender, and its 2004 follow-up, Youth. Freed from the pressures of a big record label and the constraints of post-grunge modern rock radio, the band seized the opportunity to reinvent itself. While they still retain some of their essential DNA, especially when they delve into ballads like "How Do You Love," they restyle themselves in fuzzy, shiny glam threads, sounding like a weird cross between David Bowie and INXS (and on "Feels Like (It Feels Alright)," Roland recalls nothing less than Peter Murphy in his vocals). Since Collective Soul are natives of the American South, they favor big riffs ready for big arenas to slinky T. Rex grooves, and since they once had big hits on the radio, they still favor big, glossy productions, but Youth still comes across as a stylized, somewhat modernized spin on heavy glam rock. It sounds a little bit like a streamlined, stateside Spacehog, which means that it doesn't necessarily sound hip, or like something that the "youth" of the album's title would dig, and it's not necessarily something that fans of their big ballads like "December" and "The World I Know" would like, either. But that doesn't mean it's a bad record. Far from it, actually. While the ballads are still a little too saccharine, there aren't many of them, and the rest of the record is fizzy, outsized, hooky, trashy fun. Anybody who considered Stone Temple Pilots a guilty pleasure, or thought that "Gel" was far and away Collective Soul's best song, should check this out -- it doesn't sound much like anything that the band has done before, or like anything that's on modern rock radio, but it's easily one of band's best records. It's a Collective Soul album for people who don't like Collective Soul. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$8.99

Pop - Released March 14, 1995 | Craft Recordings

$8.99

Pop - Released March 22, 1994 | Craft Recordings

$7.99

Rock - Released September 18, 2001 | Craft Recordings

$15.49

Rock - Released December 9, 2008 | El Music Group

Video
$8.99

Pop - Released February 9, 1999 | Craft Recordings

$8.99

Pop - Released March 11, 1997 | Craft Recordings

$12.99

Rock - Released December 8, 2017 | Suretone Records

$12.99

Rock - Released October 2, 2015 | Concord Vanguard

It's hard not to see the title of See What You Started by Continuing as a bit of a jab at Collective Soul themselves. Twenty-two years and nine albums deep into their career, the alt-rock-era band has neither burned out nor faded away -- they've merely persisted, putting out records at a steady clip that only slowed in the 2010s, when they took six years to succeed 2009's Collective Soul with this record. The delay may have been the result of some lineup rejiggering -- they have a different drummer in Johnny Rabb, and Jesse Triplett takes over the group's historically unsteady position of lead guitarist -- and the new members invigorate Ed and Dean Roland to return to their heavy, hooky roots. Most of the record pulsates to a fuzzy, primal beat, the lightness coming from the harmonies and melodies, the very things that have always been Collective Soul's ace in the hole. Sometimes, they shake things up with a few old tricks -- the horns on "Am I Getting Through," a hint of gospel on "Without Me," a stately power ballad on "Memoirs of 2005" -- but the record is front-loaded with the kind of riffy rockers that always made the group a pleasure. Maybe it's a mere continuation, not a revival, but this heavy dose of straight-ahead hard rock makes See What You Started by Continuing one of Collective Soul's best records yet. [See What You Started was released digitally and on CD.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$1.49

Rock - Released April 25, 2019 | Fuzze-Flex Records

$12.99

Rock - Released December 9, 2008 | El Music Group

After delving a bit too deeply into glam on 2004's Youth, their first foray into indie recordings, Collective Soul straightens things out on its 2007 follow-up, Afterwords. Contrary to the implication of the title of "New Vibration" -- the hard-hitting opener on this, their seventh album -- Afterwords brings the band close to how they sounded about a decade before, when they were riding the peak of their popularity and when modern rock bands could still be heard on the radio because there was modern mainstream rock radio. If this kind of radio still existed in 2007, Collective Soul could still have hits, at least with an album like Afterwords that unapologetically plays to their core strengths of hooky, sturdy songs, delivered unpretentiously but grandly, as if they were designed to fill an arena. There may be no one song as grabbing as "Gel" or gently transcendent as "Shine" -- or even anthemic as that power ballad classic "The World I Know" -- but the songs are big and tuneful, crying out for the appealingly glossy production they're given. Collective Soul needs that kind of huge, clean production -- the kind of recording where the drums sound cavernous, the guitars are pushed to the front along with the voice, and the slight electronic flourishes, such as the occasional drum loop, are buried and used as texture -- because they're at heart a mainstream band even if they're now on an independent label. The fact that they're now on an independent is more a reflection of the nature of the music business than the music, because Afterwords is the kind of good, solid mainstream pop/rock that isn't heard much in 2007 and anybody missing that sound should seek this out, especially fans who weren't quite thrilled with its glammier predecessor. Unlike Youth, Afterwords is a Collective Soul album for those who like Collective Soul. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$15.49

Rock - Released February 7, 2006 | El Music Group

$1.49

Rock - Released May 17, 2019 | Fuzze-Flex Records

Rock - Released October 27, 2017 | Suretone Records

Download not available
$1.49

Rock - Released December 6, 2010 | El Music Group

$8.99

Pop - Released October 10, 2000 | Craft Recordings

$1.49

Rock - Released June 7, 2019 | Fuzze-Flex Records