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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | Downtown Records - Catalog

By the time Cold War Kids released This Will All Blow Over in Time, they'd transformed themselves from quirky blues-punkers into a straight-ahead, chart-friendly band: The stomping, anthemic "First," which closes the compilation, topped the Billboard Alternative Songs chart in 2015, while their Capitol Records debut, L.A. Divine, reached number ten on Billboard's Top Rock Albums chart. As it gathers highlights from the five albums they released for their previous label Downtown Records and rarities, This Will All Blow Over in Time traces the band's evolution. In retrospect, it's easy to hear how Cold War Kids channeled the passion of their beginnings into stadium-ready rock. Even their earliest songs, such as the three tracks from their 2006 debut album Robbers & Cowards that appear here ("Hang Me Up to Dry," "Hospital Beds" and "We Used to Vacation"), boast the striding melodies and easy confidence that they blew up to epic proportions on "Miracle Mile" a few albums later. The collection gives equal time to gritty tracks like "Something Is Not Right with Me," slinky grooves such as "Royal Blue," and the soulful pop of "Audience of One" (from the 2010 EP Behave Yourself), reaffirming that the band's sizable bag of tricks played a large part in their longevity. Meanwhile, the second half of This Will All Blow Over in Time digs deeper into the band's eclectic side, gathering a cover of Nick Cave's "Opium Tea" and "Minimum Mistake," a dub-inspired reworking of "Minimum Day" produced by the late Richard Swift, alongside several tracks from the band's 2005 debut EP Mulberry Street. Though compilations like this were something of a rarity when This Will All Blow Over in Time was released in 2018, this is a well-curated collection of the band's rockers, ballads, anthems and quirkier moments that proves Cold War Kids didn't sacrifice any of their personality to achieve their success. ~ Heather Phares
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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | Downtown Records - Catalog

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Rock - Released November 2, 2018 | Downtown Records - Catalog

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Alternatif et Indé - Released August 17, 2018 | Capitol Records

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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 13, 2018 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 13, 2018 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released October 31, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released October 31, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released October 13, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released October 13, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released July 28, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 21, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 21, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 7, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 7, 2017 | Capitol Records (US1A)

Over the years, a growing sense of maturity emerged in Cold War Kids' music, with albums like Hold My Home proving that they're most successful when they're most straightforward. L.A. Divine builds on that album's solidly anthemic sound: "Love Is Mystical" and "Restless" are fine examples of the band at its stomping best. However, Cold War Kids also give L.A. Divine a little more pop sheen, and the combination of Nathan Willett's falsetto and the huge harmonies surrounding him is strangely reminiscent of Fun. on highlights like the power ballad "Part of the Night" and "No Reason to Run," a celebration of monogamy that sounds equally surprised and delighted. Indeed, much of L.A. Divine explores commitment, whether it's to a person or a city (as the title suggests, Cold War Kids' hometown was the album's muse). The band makes settling down -- but not settling -- sound less than boring on songs such as "So Tied Up," "Open Up the Heavens," and "Invincible," which tussle between vulnerability and bravado as they return to Cold War Kids' blazing rock. On the whole, L.A. Divine is a little less consistent than Hold My Home; the band's relentless intensity can get a bit exhausting, while the interludes sprinkled throughout the album feel more distracting than transporting. Nevertheless, L.A. Divine shows that Cold War Kids continue to expand their range -- and if they're becoming more accessible with each album, it's on their own terms. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 18, 2015 | Downtown Records - Catalog

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Alternatif et Indé - Released January 1, 2015 | Downtown Records - Catalog

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Alternatif et Indé - Released October 31, 2014 | Downtown Records - Catalog

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Alternatif et Indé - Released October 31, 2014 | Downtown Records - Catalog

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Between their strong comeback with Dear Miss Lonelyhearts, the promising side project French Style Furs, and Hold My Home, Cold War Kids had a creative rebirth in the mid-2010s. Recorded at their own studio, the band's fifth album is charged with an intimacy and intensity that began returning to their music with Lonelyhearts. Hold My Home is even more assertive than that album, with an opening trio of songs that rank among Cold War Kids' finest. They own their anthemic power on the brash "All This Could Be Yours" and "First," even though the song's rousing stomps and claps are at odds with Nathan Willett's uncertainty. Willett and company play with this ambivalence even more expertly on "Hot Coals," where he grapples with masculinity and emotions via pithy words ("What ever happened to the strong, silent type?") and punchy sounds, and later on the soulful tug-of-war between love and freedom "Go Quietly." The rest of Hold My Home is nearly as strong, with Cold War Kids accomplishing many of the things they've strived for on their previous albums. "Flower Drum Song" is a reminder of just how powerful their music is when they hit the sweet spot between ambitious and overwrought, while the seductive keyboards and female backing vocals on "Nights & Weekends" put some slink in their stride. Overall, the band sounds even more natural than they did on Dear Miss Lonelyhearts, whether on the appealingly garagey title track or "Hear My Baby Call," which incorporates soul and R&B influences effortlessly. This is some of Cold War Kids' best work since Robbers & Cowards, largely and somewhat paradoxically because they've shed a lot of their early theatricality (though song titles like "Harold Bloom" show they haven't lost their literary bent entirely). With Hold My Home, they emerge as a more straightforward band, and also a more confident and engaging one. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternatif et Indé - Released September 17, 2013 | Downtown Records - Catalog