Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$8.99
CD$7.29

Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Concluding Naxos' five-volume series of the piano concertos of Ferdinand Ries, pianist Christopher Hinterhuber and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Uwe Grodd, present the Piano Concerto in E flat major, Op. 42, Ries' first published concerto, and the Piano Concerto in G minor, Op. 177, his last, with the Introduction et Rondeau brillant, Op. 144, sandwiched between them. A transitional figure, Ries seems to have absorbed characteristics of the burgeoning Romantic movement while retaining the formal control of Classicism. To the extent that he resembles his contemporaries, he certainly suggests Mozart, Haydn, Clementi, and Hummel as easily as he shows the influence of Beethoven, and even anticipates Liszt. Yet there is an integrity to his works that indicates that he wasn't a slavish imitator, while being sensitive to the dramatic changes in music during the early decades of the 19th century. Hinterhuber gives Ries his due by carefully gauging the intensity of his playing and accurately conveying the proper moods, whether it is his playfulness and charm, or more intense feelings of excitement and fury. It's quite interesting to find this wide expressive range and proficiency in a minor composer, and while one may be skeptical of Ries' genius, his music certainly shows he was ingenious. © TiVo
From
CD$7.29

Classical - Released November 15, 2005 | Naxos

Booklet
From
CD$7.29

Classical - Released October 26, 2010 | Naxos

Booklet
Ferdinand Ries was a confidant of Beethoven and a composer and pianist who followed him rather slavishly. Well known during his lifetime, he was gradually forgotten after his death. This isn't hard to understand, for his works are on balance imitative; other composers of the era understood Beethoven's example better by either avoiding it (Schubert) or trying to match its extremity (Mendelssohn, in the Symphony No. 2). Yet the revival of Ries' works helps modern listeners understand how Beethoven's contemporaries heard his music. This disc, part of a series on the Naxos label devoted to Ries' piano concertos, contains a pair of works that gives a good impression of his music. The Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 115, is a warmed-over version of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37. More interesting for general listeners is the Concerto Pastoral in D major, Op. 120, whose first movement mashes up the conventions used by Beethoven in the Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, "Pastoral," with a brilliant concerto form. Ries shows skill in knitting these ideas together, and he matches the unusual opening movement with a diverse finale that announces its amibitions right off with the flat seven step in the opening material and proceeds to a loose, lyrical structure that doesn't resemble Beethoven much at all. This concerto, 28 minutes long, would make an ideal curtain raiser for one of the Beethoven concertos in concert. Pianist Christopher Hinterhuber and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra under Uwe Grodd plunge into these works with gusto, and the sound has a nice directness. Recommended for those interested in the early Romantic period. © TiVo
From
CD$7.29

Classical - Released September 1, 2007 | Naxos

Booklet
From
CD$7.29

Classical - Released March 31, 2009 | Naxos

Booklet
No critic in his/her right mind would assert that Ferdinand Ries' piano concertos are in the same aesthetic class as Beethoven's works in the same form. Like the concertos of his early Romantic contemporary Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Ries' works are far more about showing off the soloist and entertaining the audience than are Beethoven's more nobly conceived and executed masterpieces. Still, one would have to have a critical heart of stone not to be beguiled by Ries' thoroughly attractive concertos. As played here by pianist Christopher Hinterhuber with Uwe Grodd leading the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, three of Ries' works for piano and orchestra receive splendidly performed and wholly persuasive readings. Though the imposing three-movement concerto called "Farewell to England" is the most substantial work here and the Introduction et Variations Brillantes is the most overtly virtuosic, perhaps the best work to start with is the Grand Variations on "Rule Britannia." In a work with a theme familiar to almost every listener, Hinterhuber's crisp articulation and burley technique are shown to excellent advantage, and the result is the most immediately attractive piece on the disc. Recorded in clean, slightly too close sound, this disc will likely tickle the musical funny bone of listeners already familiar with Beethoven's concertos. © TiVo
From
CD$7.29

Classical - Released January 17, 2006 | Naxos

Booklet
On this entry in Naxos' Eighteenth Century Keyboard series, C.P.E. Bach: Sonatas and Rondos, young Austrian pianist Christopher Hinterhuber plays through a very well-chosen selection from J.S. Bach's "son number two's" staggering keyboard output on a modern piano. As C.P.E. Bach's music sounds more like Beethoven than it does his father's, or for that matter, any of his contemporaries, it works very well on a modern piano, and Hinterhuber does everything here considerable justice within a classical tempo, particularly Bach's transparently expressive, yet manic-depressive Sonata in F sharp minor, Wq. 52/4. If there is any reservation to be had about these performances, it is that Hinterhuber does not take it out into a bit more of a romantic territory than he does. He is a tad cold, and this music seems to benefit from some measure of give and take -- just compare Glenn Gould's reading of the Sonata in A minor, Wq. 49/1 or, if you can find them on vinyl, Artur Balsam's radiant and sensitive readings of C.P.E. Bach on Musical Heritage Society. Nevertheless, for an introduction to keyboard music of Bach son number two, played in a historically correct manner on a modern instrument, this fits the bill. © TiVo
From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Paladino Music

From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Paladino Music

From
CD$7.29

Classical - Released November 27, 2007 | Naxos

Booklet
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Paladino Music

Hi-Res
From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released January 24, 2015 | Camerata Tokyo

From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Paladino Music