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Lieder (German) - Released November 21, 2014 | Challenge Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Lieder (German) - Released October 9, 2015 | Challenge Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Lieder (German) - Released October 5, 2018 | Challenge Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | Solo Musica

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This selection of spiritual but mostly secular late Romantic vocal music offers a program that wouldn't have been heard in the music's time, with two related choral pieces by Max Reger flanking Mahler's Rückert-Lieder and the Psalm 23 (the only religious work of the bunch) of Alexander Zemlinsky. The intent on the part of the Kammerorchester Basel and Camerata Vocale Freiburg under Winfried Toll is to strike and maintain the inward mood suggested by the title (an Einsiedler is a hermit, a recluse), taken from one of the two Reger works and thence from poet Gerd Müller-Hornbach. Does it work? Arguably yes: for moody, late-night listening, the album may fill the bill, but it succeeds even more in its constituent parts. The secular Requiem by Reger and the title choral piece were published together and are linked in outlook. The performance of the Rückert-Lieder by tenor Christoph Prégardien is gentle (even in the midst of the jangled nerves of some of the pieces in this set) and in many places revelatory; his reading of the famous Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen is hypnotically beautiful. Prégardien has sacrificed some of the power to advancing age, but none of the sensitivity. As for the mixed choral-orchestral forces, this pair of rather mysteriously connected Reger choral works are not often performed and deserve wider exposure. An intriguing and original release. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Challenge Classics

Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
In 1955 Britten’s composed Still Falls the Rain, a setting for tenor, piano and horn of a poem by Edith Sitwell – the third of his five Canticles, written at various points in his life between 1947 and 1974, with three of them written as memorials: it is not a cycle as such, but merely a collection; instrumentation differs on each piece, and several are based on non-sacred texts. Sitwell, who attended the first performance, was overwhelmed by the work and her response led her to be invited to the 1956 Aldeburgh Festival where she and Britten would collaborate on a programme of her poetry to include further settings specially written for the occasion by Britten, for the same cast: tenor, horn and piano, with an additional narrator for some poems deliberately not set to music. For the event, entitled The Heart of the Matter, Britten composed extra music to surround and complement Canticle III which formed the centrepiece of the presentation. In 1983, Peter Pears revised and revived the work, and it is in this version that The Heart of the Matter has been performed since. For the world premiere, Sitwell recited her poems, Britten was at the piano, Peter pears sung and Dennis Brain tooted the horn. For the present recording, Christophe Prégardien sings and narrates the poems, Olivier Darbellay plays the horn, Michael Gees is at the piano. As a complement to the Britten work, the trio plays several songs from the Romantic period written for piano, horn and voice, by Conradin Kreutzer, Franz Lachner and Henry Hugh Pierson, closing that superb album with Schubert’s Auf dem Strom.
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Classical - Released May 7, 2021 | Challenge Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1994 | naïve classique

Classical - Released April 27, 2018 | deutsche harmonia mundi

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Two cantatas by Telemann – logically unknown, as he wrote some 1,700 of them − only one by Bach – but one that reached cult status: Ich will den Kreuzstab gerne tragen (I will gladly carry the Cross) −, here’s what’s on offer by tenor Christoph Prégardien (of German origin despite the “é”), and… Wait a second: even though we don’t exactly know for whom Telemann’s cantatas were originally written, Ich will den Kreuzstab was designed for a baritone, not a tenor, and there is no version transposed by Bach himself. But Christoph Prégardien, who’s now over sixty years old, opted to play it humble (or safe) and work with a much deeper range than Tamino or Ottavio, knowing that tenors can very well experience a loss in quality. A commendable decision that allows him to add some beautiful years to an already long and successful career as well as a change in repertoire. His very lyrical interpretation of these three cantatas demonstrates his commitment to the opera, as these cantatas are real dramatic scenes. Telemann, in particular, appears astonishing as ever with his unreal imagination and constant elegance that never gets in the way of profound emotion. For the overture, exit music and intermissions, the Vox Orchester offers some purely orchestral pages from Handel, Hasse and Telemann. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 6, 2019 | Challenge Classics

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Twenty fives years separate this new version of the Dichterliebe ("Poet's loves") and the legendary recording made by this same Christoph Prégardien with the piano-forte player Andreas Staier. The style is the same, but the singing has been clarified. At the age of 60, Christophe Prégardien's voice has retained a youthful timbre and stunning freshness. This new album offers plenty of serenity thanks to its stripped-down vocal line, sustained and carried with help from Prégardien's main current partner, Michael Gees, on the piano. There are a few wrinkles here and there; sometimes the text obliges the German singer to work (Ich grolle nicht); but the whole thing, overall, is splendid. Christoph Prégardien is a storyteller. The love stories by Schumann and Wagner to which he lends his voice are simply human and free from any expressive overload. Listen to the stunning Sechs Gedichte von Nikolaus Lenau und Requiem, Op. 90 (Six poems by Lenau and Requiem). Here, the strange melancholy that's peculiar to this cycle takes on a pained note. In Requiem, Schumann seems to catch a glimpse of his own end and Clara's widowhood, through the lens of the sad story of the tragic loves of Héloïse and Abélard. "At once supplication and fervent act of grace, borne on celestial harp arpeggios, the song rises like the flèches of gothic cathedrals in a fervent 'arsis' towards the Lord." (Brigitte François- Sappey). Wagner's Wesendock-Lieder are set between these two Schumannian masterpieces, which slightly predate him. Considered by the composer himself to be simply "sketches for Tristan and Isolde", they express all the delicacy and torment of a lover's heart, in a romantic vein that Wagner would exalt to the point of paroxysm in his later works. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 27, 2009 | Challenge Classics

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Christoph Prégardien's Challenge Classics recording of Schubert's Die Schöne Müllerin with pianist Michael Gees was so excellent that one wonders what he could possibly do for an encore. How about Schwanengesang, with his other piano partner Andreas Staier? That's a heck of a good idea; although Prégardien has recorded some selections from Schwanengesang for a one-off Schubert disc done with Gees for Virgin Classics in 1996, unlike Die Schöne Müllerin, Prégardien hasn't recorded the whole cycle before. The disc is intelligently filled out with Schubert's settings of poet Johann Gabriel Seidl, all late and including Schubert's actual last song, "Die Taubenpost." As in Die Schöne Müllerin, Prégardien employs a measure of elective ornamentation in his singing, which has elicited comment and some controversy; if Schubert had intended such details, wouldn't he have written them in? Perhaps, but all of it fits in the vocal line, the ornaments are artfully executed, and it helps add some personality and depth to Prégardien's interpretation of these very familiar, oft-recorded lieder. Andreas Staier elects to perform the accompaniment on a Graf fortepiano with a sound so alternatively powerful and mellow one would swear it was a modern piano; in loud passages the jangly sound of the fortepiano becomes apparent, but in legato passages the sound of the Graf is uncommonly smooth. As good as Staier is, Prégardien is still the star of the show; he seems to be in the right place in terms of the time he has spent singing Schubert to project these songs with the maximum amount of characterization, theater, and tonal beauty. One would have to go back to Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau in the 1960s to find Schubert lieder as good as this, and Challenge's recording quality is splendid. This is a keeper. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 22, 2008 | Challenge Classics

As he looks back upon a magnificent singing career, Christophe Prégardien (born 1956) has released these three Schubertian cycles. Over the years, Prégardien has become one of the most recognised and inspired performers of Schubert's works. His discography, however, does not stop at these three pillars of the Lied repertoire. Along with his friend Andreas Staier, he has produced many themed records for the labels deutsche harmonia mundi and Teldec Classics.This album includes the last recordings made by Prégardien with Michael Gees (Die schöne Müllerin and Winterreise) and Andreas Staier (Schwanengesang). With the treble gradually disappearing, Prégardien shifts to using lower tones while retaining his tenor voice. While a certain mannerism has come to mark his performance style, he still retains a great talent for dramatic interpretation of the texts. At the piano, Michael Gees sticks closely to Prégardien and moulds his playing to the singer's every intention.The pseudo-cycle Schwanengesang (a suite of Lieder assembled arbitrarily after the composer's death) was recorded in 2008 with Andreas Staier, who is playing a modern copy, made by Christopher Clarke, of a Graf pianoforte from 1827. These songs bear the perfect commitment and excellent expressiveness which are the hallmark of Christophe Prégardien's art. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 12, 2019 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - Released October 30, 2009 | Challenge Classics

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Classical - Released July 28, 2008 | deutsche harmonia mundi

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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released January 1, 1996 | CapriccioNR

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Classical - Released September 27, 2011 | Challenge Classics

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Tenor Christoph Prégardien has been a strong supporter of instrumental arrangements of lieder accompaniments; for Winterreise alone, he has made recordings with three different instrumental combinations, as well as a traditional version with fortepiano. On this 2011 Challenge Classics album, accompanied by the Nuremburg-based ensembleKONTRASTE, he brings that interest to songs by Schumann, Mahler, and Wilhelm Killmayer. The instrumentations, which include flute, clarinet, string quintet, piano, harmonium, and percussion, are based on the ensemble Schoenberg used in his arrangements of Mahler's Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, which conclude the album. Marcus Maria Reissenberger's arrangements of 12 Schumann songs and of four movements from Waldszenen open up the piano part with fresh, understated, and idiomatic sonorities. In some songs the change is extremely subtle; in "Mondschaft," for example, the piano part is unchanged, and quiet, sustained string chords provide occasional colorful harmonic support. The songs by Killmayer (born 1927) set to texts by Hölderlin are for the most part in a lyrical post-Romantic style; "Griechenland" is an especially lovely, elegiac piece. Prégardien's voice is warm and colorful, and he has a refreshingly unmannered delivery. He brings a thorough understanding to the songs that's reflected in the subtlety and naturalness of his phrasing. ensembleKONTRASTE performs with elegance and suppleness, making a strong case for the viability of innovative projects like this one. The sound of the SACD is exceptionally clean, realistic, and well-balanced. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 3, 2006 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released July 3, 2006 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released August 30, 1993 | deutsche harmonia mundi

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 2002 | CPO