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Ambient - Released April 6, 2018 | kranky

Similar to her previous works, composer Christina Vantzou's fourth solo album blends orchestral and electronic instruments as well as unearthly voices, resulting in slow-moving, calmly introspective soundscapes. No. 4 features a typically extensive cast of contributors who played a greater role in shaping the final product than on Vantzou's previous recordings. Opener "Glissando for Bodies and Machines in Space" perfectly encapsulates the album's sound, with Angel Deradoorian's heavenly sighs descending through untethered electro-acoustic droning. "At Dawn" is soothing in its simplicity, with soft, rich waves of cello flowing into the horizon. "Some Limited and Waning Memory" seems a wee bit more direct, with delicate piano notes pulling into focus over an ethereal drift, and the occasional re-surfacing of Deradoorian's celestial cries. Later pieces hint toward a darker, more haunted space, but stop short of sounding like a score to a suspenseful film (although the ghostly, wavy chorus at the end of "Sound House" and the ominous pulse of "Garden of Forking Paths" come close). Steve Hauschildt appears on the gently rippling closer "Remote Polyphony," which slowly shifts from soft, bright cascades to more reserved murmurations. ~ Paul Simpson
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Ambient - Released October 16, 2015 | kranky

Brussels-based multimedia artist Christina Vantzou's third album expands upon the symphonic sound of her first two, continuing to mix orchestral instruments and choir vocals with electronics in order to create shifting soundscapes that mystify and enchant. At 71 minutes in length, No. 3 is easily her longest and most ambitious album to date, as well as her most structured, as it revolves around a series of pieces called "pillars," intended to be more direct than the ethereal drones that make up the rest of her work. Electronic instruments play a much wider role here than on her first two albums, including several modular synthesizers, and the album's second track is named after computer music pioneer Laurie Spiegel, whose warm, unpretentious compositions are a natural precedent to Vantzou's work. Pieces such as "CV" have greater emotional depth than her prior recordings, employing strings and woodwinds that explore different dynamics. Vantzou's labelmate Loscil guests on "Stereoscope," adding a glowing bass pulse to a distant, decaying drone. The album feels dark, ominous, and chilling, conjuring up images of deepest space, yet there's an unmistakably human touch to it, emphasized by gentle pizzicato strings, sparse piano notes, and serene vocals. No. 3 is a breathtaking album, seamlessly mixing electronic and acoustic elements in order to create music that feels as earthly as it does cosmic. ~ Paul Simpson
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Ambient - Released February 24, 2014 | kranky

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Ambient - Released October 24, 2011 | kranky

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Ambient - Released March 1, 2018 | kranky

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Ambient - Released September 4, 2015 | kranky