Similar artists

Albums

$17.99
$15.49

Metal - Released March 8, 2019 | Nuclear Blast

Hi-Res
$17.99
$15.49

Metal - Released March 16, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

Hi-Res Booklet
While Children of Bodom are used to personnel shakeups, the departure of longtime guitarist Roope Latvala before the recording of I Worship Chaos posed a challenge. A member since 2003, he was an integral part of the band's sound. This left vocalist/guitarist Alexi Laiho handling all six-string chores alone for the first time, making this COB's debut as a quartet. It was recorded in a converted warehouse rather than a conventional recording studio, and delivers a more spacious sound. Laiho and bassist Henkka Seppälä tuned half a step lower for each song, resulting in a much darker, heavier attack. Opener "I Hurt" is classic COB with a knotty, technical death metal riff, labyrinthine scalar flights, and piercing melodic interludes. The band's characteristic mastery of rhythmic syncopation is heard best on "My Bodom (I Am the Only One)," with drummer Jaska Raatikainen adding counterpoint as he alternates between martial cadences and blastbeats and the whole tune crisscrosses time signatures. The new bottom-end string throb is most punishing on "Horns" and "Suicide Bomber," insanely tempoed, blackened thrashers heavier than anything COB has recorded in a decade. Keyboardist Janne Wirman becomes more integral to the mix. He adds force to the band's classic melo-tech death metal charge, and provides utterly seductive, sinister atmospherics in these new songs. He can either create swirling chordal backdrops -- as on the crunchy, doom-tinged "Prayer for the Afflicted" -- or powerful, fleet, single-note exchanges with Laiho -- as on the glorious "Morrigan." The latter is a medium-tempo groover and a clear single. Its riff is fueled by an infectious guitar hook as the drums alternate between pronounced swing and double-timed frenzy. It contains a chanted chorus and spiraling crescendoes. This passes for a stadium rock anthem. "All for Nothing" is an outlier even in COB's loopy catalog. It has an Iron Maiden-esque guitar and bass riff, with eloquent acoustic piano lines and transcendent melody atop thundering drums. Laiho delivers a screaming extended solo followed by one from Wirman on synth as they trade lines to take it out. The songwriting on I Worship Chaos is impressive, as if the quartet format forced COB to focus on delivering tunes of real substance before anything else. The performances are equally inspired -- the material is so good, it challenge the musicians to pull it off. This is the sound of a grown-up COB; it may not be as unhinged as their earliest records, but it's nearly as misanthropic. This band still has very sharp teeth, a nasty disposition, and a dark, even malevolent sense of humor. ~ Thom Jurek
$12.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2008 | Spin-Farm Oy

Hatebreeder, the second release from Finland's Children of Bodom, is a louder, faster, and positively heavier release than the group's debut. Under normal circumstances, this type of evolution is a guaranteed upgrade for a metal band, but not all of Hatebreeder's elements are improvements on the blueprint established during Something Wild. Most noticeably, Alexi Laiho's black metal scream is more menacing and consistent, but this is a disputed topic among Scandinavian metal enthusiasts. Many listeners enjoy the music, but could do without the bloodcurdling vocal excess, while others consider it a critical element of any real metal statement. The value of so much throat splitting is subjective, but Laiho's refinement of the approach isn't. Along with the shouting, the entire sound of Hatebreeder is improved. The guitars and keyboards are massive and more frantic, and Jaska Raatikainen's drums are unreal. In the history of metal, it is difficult to recall many displays of pure speed that top Children of Bodom. The rest of the band definitely keeps up with Raatikainen's machine-gun delivery. Guitarists Laiho and Alexander Kuoppala also deserve credit for the thick-sounding rhythms and quick lead playing. As long as these activities aren't technically enhanced, the band deserves credit for the physical accomplishment. ~ Vincent Jeffries
$12.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2007 | Spin-Farm Oy

Boy, whoever thought that technical metal was dead as a doornail during the mid- to late '90s has been proven dead wrong. Just a few years after this aforementioned era of "metal no man's land," technical metal has spread like a virus, via bands that share both an appreciation of the extreme aggression of Slayer and the technical proficiency of Iron Maiden. A fitting example of both of these metallic styles colliding as one is Finland's Children of Bodom, and especially their 2008 offering, Blooddrunk. All the ingredients from past Bodom releases are present once more -- Goth keyboards, guitar acrobatics, and vocals that sound straight out of the torture chamber. These lads sure can play their instruments, as evidenced by such intense metal blasts as the title track, "Smile Pretty for the Devil," and "Tie My Rope." But one thing that differentiates Children of Bodom from the host of other similarly styled bands is that they know the importance of succinct songwriting -- only one track here stretches past the five-minute mark. As a result, Blooddrunk showcases one of the few modern-day metal bands that manage to balance straight-to-the-point songwriting with their collective instrumental prowess. ~ Greg Prato

Metal - Released | Fontana International

Download not available

Metal - Released April 29, 2008 | Fontana International

Download not available
$12.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

Metal - Released April 29, 2008 | Fontana International

Download not available
$12.99

Metal - Released May 4, 1999 | Spinefarm

Metal - Released April 29, 2008 | Fontana International

Download not available
$15.49

Metal - Released May 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
$12.99

Metal - Released February 26, 1997 | Spinefarm

$18.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2006 | Spinefarm

Metal - Released January 1, 2008 | Spinefarm

Download not available
$4.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2009 | Spinefarm Records - Fontana International

$1.49

Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

$7.49

Metal - Released January 1, 2009 | Spinefarm Records

$14.99
$12.99

Metal - Released March 8, 2019 | Nuclear Blast

Hi-Res
Over 22 years, Finland's Children of Bodom have established a global reputation as one of the hardest-working high-profile outfits in extreme metal. Their initial popularity began with the release of 1998's Something Wild and was cemented by 2003's classic Hate Crew Deathroll, as CoB established a trademark technical death metal sound rife with classical and hard rock melodicism. The next 12 years, beginning with 2005's Are You Dead Yet? through 2015's I Worship Chaos, were filled with experimentation and restlessness; the band utilized thrash, dissonant tunings, and progressive riffs filtered through punishing heaviness. It resulted in records that were more diverse, true, but sometimes lacked the firm imprint of the band's established persona. Hexed marks the beginning of a third era for CoB. Here they seek to integrate the band's classic sound with their 2010s experiments. It also marks the recording debut of second guitarist Daniel Freyberg (Norther). Hexed kicks off with the anthemic "This Road," a pummeling orgy of power riffs, swinging snares, and kick drum grooves that feels as if it would have been at home on I Worship Chaos until its chorus wheels around on an intense but hooky riff. By contrast, first single "Under Grass and Clover" finds keyboardist Janne Warman engaging in a majestic duel with Alexi Laiho and Freyberg. Jaska Raatikainen's double-timed blastbeats, a chanted chorus, prog keyboards, and six-string lines buoying Laiho's snarling lead vocal place this track in the classic CoB pantheon. "Glass Houses" follows with the hallmarks of the band's classic sound intact and offers a blazing Laiho solo that charges the barriers and the trace influence of Vivaldi in its chromaticism. "Hecate's Nightmare" is filled with adorned, proggy, atmospheric keyboards, jagged squeals of pinch harmonics, a plodding tempo, and a squalling, effects-laden dual guitar solo. "Kick in the Spleen" commences with a slow power riff, but soon explodes into brutal thrash, bellowed gang choruses, technical death breakdowns, and more, making for an exhilarating three-and-a-half minutes. "Platitudes and Barren Words" is a forceful, hard-hitting track with a gorgeous melody, staccato guitars, and swirling keyboards amid fat, groovy drumming. The title cut, despite Laiho's carefully scripted inclusion of knotty prog elements, is actually somewhat nondescript (Beethoven-esque chromatic passages notwithstanding). Closer "Knuckleduster" is a direct nod to the past: It's a redone version of a cut from the 2004 EP Trashed, Lost and Strung Out. It fits perfectly here with its call-and-response contrapuntal guitar parts, keyboard flourishes, and thudding tom-toms. As a whole, Hexed may be CoB's most diverse and expansive-sounding album to date, ranging between their roots sound and adventurous experimentation. The synthesis approach found here makes for a compelling, deeply satisfying outing. ~ Thom Jurek
$7.49

Metal - Released January 1, 2008 | Fontana International - Spinefarm Records

$12.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2007 | Spin-Farm Oy

Black metal with the happiest keyboards the genre has ever seen, yet still uncompromisingly brutal. "Children of Decadence" could be Emerson, Lake & Palmer, for the love of Beelzebub; such is the level of complexity and prominence of synthesizers. The frightening Finnish fivesome does a nice job of mixing up tempos on this, the band's third studio disc, and manages to keep up the intensity in spite of (or maybe because of) the aural auditory mood swings. You won't even recognize the bonus track cover "Hellion," and it doesn't even matter. ~ Brian O'Neill