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Electronic/Dance - Released March 25, 1996 | !K7 Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Unlike the typically live (or at least live-sounding) mix albums in the DJ-Kicks series, Carl Craig did much post-production work on his volume. The result is a collection of complex, reworked techno from Craig's own Planet E label (by Clark, Designer Music, and the 4th Wave) as well as other crucial techno producers such as Claude Young, Kosmic Messenger, Octagon Man, and Gemini. The addition of a special Carl Craig track -- composed entirely with the use of samples from originals included elsewhere on the collection -- is a nice touch to what proves to be an admirable collection. ~ John Bush
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Techno - Released May 12, 2017 | InFiné

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An untouchable. The status of Carl Craig , pioneer of Detroit Techno, is such that without him, countless electro tinkers would still be fooling around with their Playmobil to this day... the album that he offers here is a project all in its own right. Versus is in effect a kind of work in progress which subscribes to the philosophy of InFiné, an expert in stylistic hybridisation, and Planet E, the stable founded by Craig en 1991. It is also a kind of epilogue to a concert that the American played in 2008, at the Cité de la Musique, at which he was accompanied by the Les Siècles orchestra directed by François-Xavier Roth, Berlin electro producer Moritz Von Oswald and classical pianist (and electro musician) Francesco Tristano Schlimé. On the bill, City Life by Steve Reich, Streets by Bruno Mantovani and six pieces by Craig… Almost a decade later, Versus takes its inspiration from a this meeting of the genres. Here we find electronic miniatures plunged into the grandeur of symphonic music. Twelve of the fourteen pieces on the record are by Craig (mostly his great classics), with Tristano looking after the arrangements. The latter is also the writer of the other two pieces. Versus offers, above all, welcome and intelligently-composed and arranged performances which avoid the clichés that the marketing label " techno meets classical " could easily conjure up.. Inspiring and inspired. © MD/Qobuz
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Electronic/Dance - Released May 17, 2019 | Planet E Communications

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House - Released April 24, 2019 | InFiné

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Techno - Released May 4, 2018 | InFiné

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Techno - Released February 23, 2018 | InFiné

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 26, 2008 | !K7 Records

Compiling each Carl Craig remix would be a several-disc box set undertaking. The pool from which to draw is wide and deep, from Nexus 21's 1989 track "(Still) Life Keeps Moving" through Junior Boys' Grammy-nominated "Like a Child." Hopefully just the first way of addressing this large stockpile of varied tracks, Sessions is a two-disc set mixed by Craig that focuses primarily on his remixes (of tracks by others as well as himself) while interspersing a few original mixes of his productions. Though the set reaches back to 1992 for Chez Damier's synthetic-handclap-happy "Help Myself," there's a clear emphasis on Craig's more recent activities, with well over half of the tracks dating from 2004 or later. While he hadn't quite pulled a disappearing act during the late '90s and very early 2000s -- 2002's The Workout being one of the most improperly slept-on house/techno mixes of the last several years -- he underwent something of a rebirth around 2003, releasing a string of unpredictable and high-quality productions while developing into one of the hottest remixers on the planet. Most of the big reworkings are here in original or "exclusive," meaning slightly different, form: the low-key hiss-and-ping of Junior Boys' "Like a Child," Faze Action's searing/surging "In the Trees," Delia Gonzalez & Gavin Russom's spiraling "Relevee." In most cases -- Theo Parrish's "Falling Up" being the one major exception -- Craig's versions outstrip the originals not just by making them more palatable to moving bodies but also by teasing out elements and supplementing them with new wrinkles to make headphone listening as stimulating as dancefloor play. Remaining vital in any field for 20 years is an achievement, but doing so while forecasting and riding the rapid developments in dance music is something else entirely. This release goes some distance -- about as far as possible in two and a half hours -- to acknowledge that notion. ~ Andy Kellman
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 14, 2007 | Planet E Communications

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 26, 2008 | !K7 Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 14, 2007 | Planet E Communications

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 14, 2007 | Planet E Communications

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House - Released December 15, 2017 | InFiné

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Techno - Released March 17, 2017 | InFiné

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Electronic/Dance - Released July 7, 2009 | Planet E Communications

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Techno - Released April 12, 2018 | InFiné

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Techno - Released April 25, 2018 | InFiné

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Techno - Released April 13, 2017 | InFiné

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Electronic/Dance - Released May 17, 2019 | Planet E Communications

Carl Craig established Detroit Love in 2014 as a way to represent the rich, diverse heritage of the Detroit techno scene throughout the world. Teaming up with nearly all of the scene's first and second wave mainstays as well as younger torchbearers like Kyle Hall and Jay Daniel, he's presented Detroit Love events at clubs and festivals across the globe, connecting international dancefloors with the spirit of the Motor City. Stacey Pullen mixed the first Detroit Love album in 2018, and the second volume comes from Craig himself. For the most part, it's an accurate summary of the state of Detroit clubbing in 2019, sounding like a typical night at TV Lounge or a weekend at the annual Movement festival. The mix starts on a grand, somewhat bombastic note with an orchestral version of Kevin Saunderson's "World of Deep," not dissimilar to Craig's own Versus album. After launching into the beat, the majority of the mix hinges around steady tech-house, rarely straying from an optimistic, uplifting mood (even considering the sinister undertones of "Rosalie," Craig's collaboration with Green Velvet). Two of the tracks end with a verse which pledges allegiance to the underground, serving as a statement of intent for this whole Detroit Love concept -- it's worldwide and meant to appeal to anyone who appreciates good dance music, but it avoids the crass commercialization of EDM. Without going too over the top, several of the tracks express excitement, from the exuberant vocal interjections of the Octave One and Waajeed tracks to the gospel-infused fervor of Floorplan's remix of Sophie Lloyd's "Calling Out." Delano Smith's "Safe Place" is relatively calm and tranquil, but things get a bit wilder and weirder with Ataxia's slightly aggressive "Oblivion" and the trippy, acrobatic "Boss" by Matthew Dear, under his Brain pseudonym. After flashing back to the '80s with Rhythim Is Rhythim's stone-cold classic "It Is What It Is," Craig includes a slice of dark electro from an early Ectomorph EP. Then the program ends with Cybotron's debut single, "Alleys of Your Mind," as covered by garage rock greats the Dirtbombs, taken from Party Store, their severely misunderstood album of Detroit techno covers. The track's presence demonstrates Craig's willingness to think outside the box, as well as the interconnectedness of the Detroit music scene (and really music in general). ~ Paul Simpson