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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1967 | Philips

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This 1967 LP was both Gal Costa's and Caetano Veloso's debut. It's a quiet, post-bossa nova effort characterized by fine singing and some very good songs, some of them penned by Veloso himself. In some ways, Domingo is more like a folk singer/songwriter album out of the '60s London scene than a Brazilian pop record. As it was, this was a deceptive calm-before-the-storm since both artists would soon play central roles in the wild, psychedelic experimental scene known as Tropicalia. It would take years of musical and political tumult before each of them regained their footing, which makes this relatively modest and innocent beginning all the more valuable. © Richard Mortifoglio /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1967 | Universal Music International Ltda.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
One look at the doleful expression that Caetano Veloso wears on the cover of his third self-titled album, from 1971, and it's clear that the listener is in for a bummer. It's a dead-eyed look that says, "Friend, sit down, have a drink, and listen to my weary tale." And a weary homesick tale it is, for the man who only a few years earlier had been one of the catalysts in a revolution that sent the Brazilian music world on the psychedelic Beatles-lovin' roller coaster of Tropicalia was now living in the U.K. in a government-imposed exile. Gone are the Day-Glo flashes of his earlier albums, replaced by the realism of a revolutionary whose dreams have been shuttered. If there was any doubt to the depths of his melancholy, Veloso clears it up right away with "A Little More Blue," reflecting on being thrown in jail and declaring that his exile is worse than his Brazilian imprisonment. Even more dismal may be the lovesick tribute to his sister, "Maria Bethânia," which plainly spells out his physical and emotional disconnection. It's not all so dismal, though; there are upbeat songs as well, like the acknowledged classic "London, London" and the lone Portuguese-sung track, "Asa Branca." There are Brazilian touches in the drums and Veloso's phrasing, but the album is more in the tradition of downer folk classics like Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks and Tim Buckley's Happy Sad. If that seems like heavy company, then seek out this emotionally rich and complex work by an artist who doesn't merely stand on the shoulders of giants -- he is one of the giants. © Wade Kergan /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 2012 | Universal Music International Ltda.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Released in 1972, Transa was recorded by Caetano Veloso during his exile in London, England, shortly before his return to Brazil. The sound of '70s electric rock predominates, fused with Brazilian rhythms and percussion, berimbau sounds, and his own violão playing. Several lyrics in English, and also in Portuguese, carefully avoid direct reference to politics, which may be found disguised in all songs, especially in the melancholic and depressed images of the poem by Gregório de Matos, "Triste Bahia," for which Veloso wrote the music. "It's a Long Way" also makes ciphered references to the political situation and was broadly played in the '70s. The broad use of pontos de capoeira (music used for accompaniment of capoeira, a martial art developed by Brazilian slaves as a resistance against the whites) can also be understood in that sense. The album also has "Mora na Filosofia," a classic and beautiful samba by Monsueto that scandalized people with its rock rendition. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released May 25, 2018 | Universal Music International Ltda.

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1969 | Universal Music International Ltda.

This second Caetano Veloso solo LP was recorded in June 1969, when Veloso and Gilberto Gil were behind the bars of the military dictatorship. The albums (Gil also recorded his own) were devised in part to provide them with a connection to the outside world through which authorities would be discouraged in attempting some violence against them. The voices were unsophisticatedly recorded with the sole backing of their own violões and a metronome, and the arrangements were added later in the studio, which was an indigenous and competent subversion of the basics of production, especially if you take into consideration the available technology at that time. The general tone of this album is coherent with the depressing moment Veloso and the rest of the country were going through. The English lyrics of his "The Empty Boat" have several strong images of desperation and sadness. The fado "Os Argonautas" represents implicitly the aspiration that, as Portugal had got ridden of Salazar (in the precedent year by a stroke), Brazil could also got rid of its dictatorship. The superbly modern arrangements of Rogério Duprat and the songs "Não Identificado," "Acrilírico," and "Marcianita," on the other hand, contribute to the anarchic, chaotic, and psychedelic setting of Tropicalia in which make part the rustic fuzzed-out guitars. But maybe the most important thing here is the evident artistic sincerity felt throughout the album: it is when the listener feels himself as a voyeur, peeping through the artist's deepest emotions. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1998 | Universal Music Mexico

In this uneven album, Caetano Veloso used cool jazz and Gil Evans' orchestrations as the raw material for his synthesis with contemporary Bahian rhythms -- "Terra," from 1978, is an epic description in which Sketches of Spain influences dialogue with their rhythmic similarity with Bahian grooves. The track is the best of the album, which brings no news other than the interpretation of "Prenda Minha," from the gaúcho folklore, and the ridiculous yet highly rewarding financially track "Sozinho" (which may be the best reason for a Veloso album reaching the cipher of 1,200,000 sold copies for the first time), which propelled the selling of the album and its presence in the top radio charts. "Jorge de Capadócia" (Jorge Ben, 1975) is an emotional and beautiful delivery of the important song, but included in this repertory after Racionais MC's recorded it, it sounds a bit opportunistic -- the visceral phrase "eu estou vestido com as roupas e as armas de Jorge" (I am dressed with the clothes and weapons of Jorge's," a reference to the religious syncretism that unifies Saint Georges and Oxum in a Negro entity of protection, resistance, and survival) sounds incongruous when delivered by this elegant gentleman in an expensive suit. Musically, the excellent cool jazz orchestral arrangements for "Esse Cara," "Prenda Minha," "Terra," "Meditação" (a bossa classic propelled by a Bahian percussion), the also splendid Latin jazz arrangements for "Mel" (recorded by sister Maria Bethânia, here sung in Spanish in a convenient Mercosul version), and the delicate, straight voice/violão renditions for "Bem Devagar," "Drão," "Saudosismo," and the beautiful Chico Buarque song "Carolina" make the album worthwhile -- even if listeners must endure the shameless plug for Veloso's book, the pretentious Verdade Tropical. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released September 16, 2003 | Nonesuch

It is understandable that Elektra/Nonesuch deemed an overview of Caetano Veloso's output on the label appropriate, but naming this collection The Best of Caetano Veloso is audacious. Veloso has been a pioneer of Brazilian pop since 1967, when his debut album sparked one of Brazil's most famous movements in music and politics, the legendary Tropicalia movement. Presumably due to publishing rights, Elektra/Nonesuch did not access the vaults of the Phillips label, which, along with that first album, contain the first 20 years of Veloso's output. This is fine and dandy, but to reiterate: the 12 years spanning the collected material here do not make a considerable enough dent in Veloso's 30-plus-year career as an influential recording artist to tag "Best Of" to the cover of this release and leave it at that. In fact, it is a misleading slap in the face. That aside, Elektra/Nonesuch has pieced together a nice collection of songs Veloso recorded for them between the years 1989 and 2001. It is astonishing to note how much Veloso has continued to evolve with finesse through his career, never rooting himself in a single place, but instead exploring constantly. His arrangements are sometimes sparse, sometimes gorgeously complex, sometimes dissonant, and sometimes wild. Most of these tendencies are explored on this collection, from the beautiful and lush "Manhatã" to the polyphony of "13 de Maio" to the string quartet and vocal waltz "Fina Estampa" to the rhythmic and melodic glory of "Un Tom." It is easy to become so lost in the marvelous organicity of Veloso's compositions and his downy voice that the diversity and calculations of his arrangements become an afterthought. This is a mystifying effect -- one does not have to dissect these songs because they are so natural; however, once the nuances are placed under the scientific ear, endless imagination and innovation are revealed. There have been many attempts to describe this imagination and innovation Veloso exudes to an American audience over the years, as David Byrne's liner notes state, without success, because the comparisons to the founding fathers of Western music are invalid. Byrne points out that Veloso's contributions to the world's music stage rival Lennon/McCartney melodically, Dylan poetically, and the inventiveness of Neil Young, Serge Gainsbourg, Stevie Wonder, and others. He has a point; no music fan ever refers to the music of Paul Simon by stating who Simon sounds like, simply because Paul Simon sounds only like Paul Simon, and while it is difficult to impress such a concept on the ears of those not familiar with Veloso, he is an artist of such magnitude and should be recognized as such. The Best of Caetano Veloso provides much to back this up and is an excellent starting point for the uninitiated, even if it pretends almost two-thirds of Veloso's remarkable career never existed. © Gregory McIntosh /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released April 8, 2016 | Nonesuch

Booklet
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1983 | Universal Music International Ltda.

Uns opens with the swinging title track, with its rhythmic poetry based in the word that means "some people," opening endless possibilities: "Musical" is a melancholic and delicate melody, delivered with simplicity; "Eclipse Oculto" was the big hit of the album with its hybrid reggae rhythm and lyrics that are a monologue directed to a former lover; "Peter Gast" is the best melody/arrangement of the album, a sophisticated ballad; "Quero Ir Aa Cuba" has swinging Caribbean rhythms; "Coisa Mais Linda" (Carlos Lyra/Vinícius de Moraes), a bossa classic, is delivered in the purest bossa style; "Você É Linda," which also was a hit, is a ballad whose lyrics describe in detail the charms of a certain Bahian girl; "Bobagens, Meu Filho, Bobagens" (Marina Lima/Antônio Cícero) is a minor pop ballad; "A Outra Banda da Terra," a reggae song, talks about territorialism with redneck accent; the samba-funk "Salva Vida," with special guest Maria Betânia, provokes conservatives with references to masculine beauty; and the classic, beautiful samba-enredo "É Hoje" (Didi/Mestrinho) closes the album. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1972 | Universal Music International Ltda.

An exciting live recording of Caetano Veloso with fellow Tropicalista Chico Buarque at a performance in Salvador. A wonderful example of the kind of mania that surrounded Veloso's return from exile and his unselfishness when it came to sharing the spotlight. © John Dougan /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 2, 2007 | Nonesuch

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released May 7, 1986 | Nonesuch

This album was recorded at Vanguard Studios in New York in September 1985. Caetano Veloso performs acoustic versions of some of his own songs and also some covers by other artists. The sound and atmosphere are very quiet and intimate, and most of the time Veloso's vocals are only backed by his own acoustic guitar playing. A couple of tracks are spiced up with some delicate percussion backing. The version of "O Homem Velho" from Veloso's 1984 album, Velô, is stunningly beautiful. There is also an acoustic performance of the relatively rare but fine track "Saudosismo" from 1968. Another great song featured here is "Luz do Sol," written by Veloso but originally recorded by Gal Costa in 1971. Among the covers are a version of "Get out of Town" by Cole Porter and a very intriguing version of Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean." There is also a very beautiful interpretation of Tom Jobim and Vinícius de Morães' classical ballad "Eu Sei Wue Vou Te Amar." The version of "Terra" doesn't eclipse the original studio version (found on the 1978 album Muito), but it is still very beautiful and clearly different from the original. This fine album should be especially interesting for listeners who are already familiar with the music of Caetano Veloso. © Philip Jandovský /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 2, 2007 | Nonesuch

Veloso continues to show his pre-eminence as a singer and songwriter with Noites Do Norte. He may be almost 60, but he's far from set in his ways, still chipping away at lyrical and musical boundaries. But where he looked outward many years ago, getting inspiration from the rock music of Britain and America, these days he looks inside, at Brazil, making songs like his version of Jorge Ben's "Zumbi" a cinematic journey across Brazil. The title track delves back into history, its words taken directly from the writing of 19th century abolitionist Joaquim Nabuco. Inevitably, samba and bossa nova remain the musical touchstones, but they're also the jumping-off point for experimentation, such as the hip-hop drumming (up front in the mix) on the opener, "Zera a Reza," or "13 De Maio," where son Moreno Veloso offers his own idiosyncratic approach to the playing and engineering. "Ia" uses electric guitar and drums to make a swirling soundscape that's almost modern psychedelia behind Veloso's instantly recognizable voice. Never content to tread ground he's already covered, Veloso continues to go off the map. © Chris Nickson /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released September 1, 1989 | Nonesuch

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released September 21, 2000 | LucasRecords

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released May 1, 1992 | Nonesuch

This album had so much success that it yielded the show and album Circuladô Ao Vivo. It opens with "Fora Da Ordem," a funk track dealing with urban socio-economic problems in Brazil. "Circuladô de Fulô," a baião with cello and Indian-like scales, was built over the concrete poet Haroldo de Campos' poem of the same name (from the book Galáxias). "Itapuã" is a modern elegy for the beautiful beach, where Veloso is backed by a contemporary arrangement for string quartet and rhythmic section. "Boas Vindas," a rhythmic Bahian samba with special guest Gilberto Gil, highlights love for life. "Ela Ela," written with Arto Lindsay, brings modernist interventions of both. In "Santa Clara, Padroeira Da Televisão," Veloso tries to exorcise the bad name of television through a happy and rhythmic percussive groove. His usual renditions of forgotten values of the past are represented in this album by the beautiful "Baião da Penha" (Guio De Mories/David Nasser). "Neide Candolina" draws from the example of a black woman who transcended poverty through hard work. "O Cu Do Mundo," with the participation of Gal Costa and Gilberto Gil, has with all its aggressiveness a criticism directed at violence. "A Terceira Margem Do Rio" is a beautiful composition by Milton Nascimento/Veloso. Under its universe of ecological images, glimpses of psychoanalytical and semantic impressions show. The bossa "Lindeza" closes the album with delicacy, with keyboardist Ryuichi Sakamoto as a guest accompanist. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released April 6, 2004 | Nonesuch

A Foreign Sound is a love letter to the music of North America from Brazil's most consistently inventive and accomplished musical ambassador. A showcase for Caetano Veloso's prodigious talents as an arranger, interpreter, musician, and singer, this is a grand homage to the depth and breadth of the 20th century American songbook. The range of material is impressive, going from Gershwin, Porter, Berlin, and Rodgers & Hart (including a remarkable, a cappella version of "Love for Sale") to Bob Dylan, Stevie Wonder, and Nirvana. It's the modern covers that really surprise, revealing Veloso's inspired range and the elasticity of the term "classic." His interpretations integrate bossa nova, jazz, and the Tropicalismo elements he has been honing since the mid-'60s, but with an impeccable refinement and subtlety that testify to his seasoned musicianship and vision. © Anthony Tognazzini /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1986 | Universal Music International Ltda.

This live album had a big hit with "Vaca Profana," re-recorded by Gal Costa and several other artists. Veloso recovers two of João Gilberto's delicate jewels, "Oba-lá-Lá" and "Bim Bom"; "Pra Que Mentir," a fundamental song by the fundamental duo Noel Rosa/Vadico, with an excellent violão arrangement; and the classics "Calúnia," "Kalú," "Solidão," "Lealdade," and the Gardel tango "Cuesta Abaixo." "Nosso Eestranho Amor," and "Dom de Iludir" are Veloso's creations that deserve mention. This is one of the delicate albums by Veloso, singing alone with his violão (which reaches considerable sophistication here). © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1972 | Universal Music International Ltda.

The famous pre-exile concert of Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil. Recorded at the Castro Alves Theater in Salvador, this is the sound of the founders of Tropicalia cutting loose. Sinuous bossa nova meets rock & roll and beat poetry. Adding to the excitement of this gig is the knowledge that this was music that, in the eyes of the Brazilian government, was being made by outlaws. At this time, both Veloso and Gil were proudly waving their freak flags high. © John Dougan /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released February 25, 2014 | Nonesuch

Booklet