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Classical - Released June 5, 2020 | InFiné

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After Glass Cage in 2000 and Glass Piano in 2015, New York Julliard graduate pianist Bruce Brubaker returns to his obsession with Philip Glass. Brubaker taught Francesco Tristano, who went on to create many bridges between classical and electronic music. He is also one of Philip Glass’ specialists, a composer that he has played and reinterpreted many times.This time, Brubaker chose to team up with Irish musician Max Cooper, the flagship of IDM. Cooper who, on his last album, Yearning for the Infinite, invented a sort of “chaos generator”, was the perfect candidate for a tribute to one of the masters of minimalism. In the album, the seminal piece Two Pages (1968) acts as a “single track” (provided that this concept has any meaning here). It is a ten-minute hypnotic piano solo deepened by the modular synthesizer that Cooper adds to the background. The record opens and closes with two key pieces: Metamorphosis 2, a cathartic composition, and one of Glass’ major “hits,” and the Opening of Glassworks where Max Cooper’s discrete work reinforces the piece’s contemplative feel. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 15, 2016 | InFiné

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Solo Piano - Released May 28, 2015 | InFiné

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Classical - Released June 16, 2009 | InFiné

This very appealing disc of post-minimal solo piano music, played by Bruce Brubaker, includes two multi-movements works by William Duckworth and Philip Glass. Composer and music critic Kyle Gann describes Duckworth's The Time Curve Preludes (1977-1978), which use repetitive structures, an essentially tonal harmonic language, and a limited amount of musical material, as the first examples of post-minimal music, because of their brevity, which runs counter to the element of minimalism in which musical changes unfold very slowly over a long time span. The preludes are in two books of 12 movements each, and Brubaker plays the first book. Although they rarely involve exact repetition, each prelude takes a musical idea and examines it from a variety of subtly shifting perspectives. The preludes generally have limited harmonic movement and are frequently built on drones, so they tend to create a sense of stasis and equilibrium, sometimes quietly meditative and sometimes busy. Duckworth's quirky hallmark mixture of major and minor modes is evident in many of the preludes. The harmonic movement and gestures of Glass' Six Etudes for Piano, from 1994, make the pieces immediately recognizable as his work. The movements of the suite have widely varied moods, from the gently ecstatic to the frenetic. Brubaker has long been an advocate for American piano music of this era, and he plays with consummate understanding and sensitive attention to the details of the music's structure. Arabesque's sound quality is warm and present. © TiVo
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Ambient - Released October 9, 2015 | InFiné

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Fans of electro are extremely familiar with the concept of a remix, but the art has also existed for a long time in classical and contemporary music. New York pianist Bruce Brubaker has dedicated his career to the exploration of this concept. Released in May 2015, Glass Piano is the first collaboration between Brubaker and the InFiné label, which brought beautiful reinterpretations of pieces by Philip Glass to the solo piano. From these titles, the label decided to continue the process initiated by Brubaker by inviting artists from different generations and genres to revisit pieces from Glass Piano. The EP starts with a recent signing of the label’s, Julien Earle. The American producer is only 17 years old, and crafts a remix of Mad Rush that is full of emotion; it is a house-y tune reminiscent of one Nicolas Jaar. For his part, another producer, Akufen, opts for a cozier atmosphere that blends jazz with an exactitude that heads towards Tangerine Sunset Mix by John Beltran, borrowing riffs and air guitars. By contrast, Biblo takes the listener to a darker atmosphere with his interpretation, which blends techno and ambient vocals, sounding soft and tortured. What follows is a remix done by the classical pianist and electro-dabbler Francesco Tristano Schlimé, who maintains a special relationship with the label and with Brubaker. Tristano was, indeed, a student of Bruce Brubaker’s at the Julliard School in New York. He was also the first artist to be signed to InFiné – his album Not For Piano was released on the label in 2007. Finally, Plaid, the legendary London duo on Warp, brand Metamorphosis 5 with their electronic stamp, involving more than just a touch of hip-hop…
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Electronic/Dance - Released September 28, 2018 | InFiné

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Classical - Released January 26, 2018 | InFiné

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Classical - Released March 21, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

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Meredith Monk's Piano Songs consists of pieces or other material dating from 1971 to 2006, originally composed for voice or conceived with aspects of song at their core. Yet writing for two pianos presented Monk with many possibilities, and she didn't always rely on song structure as her model. This ECM New Series release by Ursula Oppens and Bruce Brubaker shows how strongly Monk was influenced by the minimalism of the 1970s, because the kinetic patterns of Obsolete Objects, Folkdance, Tower, Railroad, Window in 7's, and Totentanz create their content and define the form. Even such song-like pieces as Ellis Island, Urban March, Paris, and Parlour Games have active patterns that move the music along, though at a more moderate pace. Perhaps only the St. Petersburg Waltz and the Phantom Waltz are constructed with a conventional single-line melody and accompaniment, and the repeated chord progressions provide a traditional harmonic rhythm, rather than generate the main material. Oppens and Brubaker perform with precision and energy, and the album presents a mix of bright and energetic pieces with softer, moodier reflections. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 16, 2007 | InFiné

The piano may not be the ideal medium for capturing the expressive possibilities of Glass' style of minimalism, but pianist Bruce Brubaker selects pieces that work well on the instrument. Part of the problem with hearing Glass on the piano is forgetting the sound of his ensemble, and the variety of colors (and volume) they have imparted to similar music. Brubaker begins his recital of works by Glass and Alvin Curran with his transcription of "Knee Play 4" from Einstein on the Beach. It is in fact a lovely piece on the piano if one can put the spectacular power and tonal range of the instrumental version out of one's mind. "Opening" from Glassworks, originally scored for piano, works beautifully on the instrument, and flows as naturally as the C major Prelude from Book I of The Well Tempered Clavier. The two pieces by Curran, Hope Street Tunnel Blues III and Inner Cities II, use a syntax similar to Glass, with a more dissonant tonal vocabulary. Hope Street Tunnel Blues III has ample kinetic energy that gives it an exhilarating momentum. At a length of 20 minutes, Inner Cities II unfolds on a much larger canvass than the Glass pieces recorded here. While it's effectively atmospheric, it doesn't have enough of a clear structural framework to hold the listener's interest, and at the end, it includes an incongruous jazz lick that seems to have no relation to the rest of the piece. Brubaker plays with obvious commitment, and with sensitivity to the nuances required to keep the music of such repetitiveness moving, even though his "Opening" doesn't match the limpid lyricism of Glass' own performance. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 17, 2003 | InFiné

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Classical - Released October 10, 2000 | InFiné

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Arabesque Recordings

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Classical - Released June 16, 2009 | Arabesque Recordings

This very appealing disc of post-minimal solo piano music, played by Bruce Brubaker, includes two multi-movements works by William Duckworth and Philip Glass. Composer and music critic Kyle Gann describes Duckworth's The Time Curve Preludes (1977-1978), which use repetitive structures, an essentially tonal harmonic language, and a limited amount of musical material, as the first examples of post-minimal music, because of their brevity, which runs counter to the element of minimalism in which musical changes unfold very slowly over a long time span. The preludes are in two books of 12 movements each, and Brubaker plays the first book. Although they rarely involve exact repetition, each prelude takes a musical idea and examines it from a variety of subtly shifting perspectives. The preludes generally have limited harmonic movement and are frequently built on drones, so they tend to create a sense of stasis and equilibrium, sometimes quietly meditative and sometimes busy. Duckworth's quirky hallmark mixture of major and minor modes is evident in many of the preludes. The harmonic movement and gestures of Glass' Six Etudes for Piano, from 1994, make the pieces immediately recognizable as his work. The movements of the suite have widely varied moods, from the gently ecstatic to the frenetic. Brubaker has long been an advocate for American piano music of this era, and he plays with consummate understanding and sensitive attention to the details of the music's structure. Arabesque's sound quality is warm and present. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 16, 2007 | Arabesque Recordings

The piano may not be the ideal medium for capturing the expressive possibilities of Glass' style of minimalism, but pianist Bruce Brubaker selects pieces that work well on the instrument. Part of the problem with hearing Glass on the piano is forgetting the sound of his ensemble, and the variety of colors (and volume) they have imparted to similar music. Brubaker begins his recital of works by Glass and Alvin Curran with his transcription of "Knee Play 4" from Einstein on the Beach. It is in fact a lovely piece on the piano if one can put the spectacular power and tonal range of the instrumental version out of one's mind. "Opening" from Glassworks, originally scored for piano, works beautifully on the instrument, and flows as naturally as the C major Prelude from Book I of The Well Tempered Clavier. The two pieces by Curran, Hope Street Tunnel Blues III and Inner Cities II, use a syntax similar to Glass, with a more dissonant tonal vocabulary. Hope Street Tunnel Blues III has ample kinetic energy that gives it an exhilarating momentum. At a length of 20 minutes, Inner Cities II unfolds on a much larger canvass than the Glass pieces recorded here. While it's effectively atmospheric, it doesn't have enough of a clear structural framework to hold the listener's interest, and at the end, it includes an incongruous jazz lick that seems to have no relation to the rest of the piece. Brubaker plays with obvious commitment, and with sensitivity to the nuances required to keep the music of such repetitiveness moving, even though his "Opening" doesn't match the limpid lyricism of Glass' own performance. © TiVo

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Bruce Brubaker in the magazine
  • Brubaker and Cooper, Men of Glass
    Brubaker and Cooper, Men of Glass With "Glassforms", the American pianist and the Irish producer revisit their idol's compositions, producing a very contemporary record. A Qobuzissime collaboration.
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