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Rock - Released September 11, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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The 2013 release Sempiternal saw the English decibel pushers more or less obliterating their deathcore past with a soaring set of aggro-alt-rock anthems that were as darkly lush as they were emotionally punishing. That's the Spirit, Bring Me the Horizon's fifth studio long-player, completes that sea change by incorporating more electronic elements into the mix and moving even closer to the mainstream via a bevy of meaty, melodic hooks and fist-pumping, stadium-ready choruses that invoke names like Linkin Park, Avenged Sevenfold, 30 Seconds to Mars, and even late-'90s Metallica. What they haven't left behind is the generalist angst, as evidenced by second-hand embarrassment-inducing gems like "True friends stab you in the front" and "My heart's a hieroglyph, it talks in tongues," but Bring Me the Horizon's penchant for wallowing in social dystopia is tempered by their newfound proclivity for dabbling in big, unabashed pop pageantry. That they manage to keep the edges of those populist tendencies razor-sharp is what keeps That's the Spirit from dissolving into a puddle of alt-rock/nu metal bandwagon treacle. Standout cuts like "Throne," "Drown," "Doomed," and, most auspiciously, the fevered, pom-pom-led "Happy Song" are as snarky as they are apoplectic, with frontman Oliver Sykes, who relies almost solely on his clean voice this time around, delivering the bad news with measured conviction. What's most surprising is how natural it all feels, but that's due in large part to the long-form recalibration of the band's sound. By entering the mainstream one limb (album) at a time, Bring Me the Horizon are merely reaping what they've sown, and longtime fans should already feel acclimated to the water. ~ James Christopher Monger
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amo

Rock - Released January 25, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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Fully committing to the mainstream-leaning direction of 2015's That's the Spirit, English quintet Bring Me the Horizon takes that ethos ten steps further with their daring sixth album, Amo. While its predecessor was already considered divisive for fans of the formerly deathcore/metalcore outfit, this is the one that could really split the fan base. Amo is the sound of a completely rebooted band. The results are refreshing and exciting, but shouldn't be entirely unexpected given Spirit's poppiest moments and frontman Oli Sykes' ever-changing vocal delivery. Here, Bring Me the Horizon have perfected a post-hardcore/pop blend (popcore?) that is daring and experimental, absorbing elements from the realms of electronic, synth pop, and trap while weaving them effortlessly with their existing base of pummeling drums, crushing riffs, the occasional throat-shredding screaming, and even orchestral embellishments inspired by their 2016 stint at the Royal Albert Hall. The second effort to be produced by Sykes and bandmate Jordan Fish, Amo centers on its titular theme of love, covering the spectrum from pure romance to toxic passion and the shades between that were mainly inspired by Sykes' 2016 infidelity-inspired divorce and his 2017 second marriage. Surprisingly, much of the pain is reserved for the more subdued moments like the atmospheric "I Apologise If You Feel Something"; the patient "In the Dark," which sounds like an angsty Ed Sheeran number; the electro-washed "Ouch"; and the dreamy future house "Fresh Bruises." The pure pop single "Medicine" shocks simply with its accessibility and mainstream-ready hook, while "Mother Tongue" is soaring and sugary, showcasing Sykes' tender and earnest vocal delivery. While this may seem worrisome for listeners expecting a taste of something heavy, Bring Me the Horizon are sure not to completely alienate their loyal fans, reserving the vitriol for Amo's heaviest moments. Lead single "Mantra" is the big singalong anthem, heavy enough to stand alongside the highlights on That's the Spirit, while the apocalyptic "Wonderful Life" with Cradle of Filth's Dani Filth and the cheekily titled "Sugar Honey Ice & Tea" crash and boom with aplomb. One of the album's biggest risks -- and its exhilarating standout -- is "Nihilist Blues," a collaboration with art-popster Grimes that resurrects the throbbing Eurodance of the '90s in a dark rave that recalls the AFI industrial-techno side project Blaqk Audio. While a little old-fashioned bloodletting might be welcome for familiarity's sake, Bring Me the Horizon's early albums are available for those purging needs. Amo is a genre-bending thrill ride that marks a brave new era for the band. Placing a significant amount of trust in their fan base, Bring Me the Horizon deliver an utterly refreshing and forward-thinking statement that finds them in complete control of their vision. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
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Rock - Released August 24, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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Metal - Released September 1, 2016 | Epitaph

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Rock - Released July 23, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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Metal - Released October 31, 2011 | Epitaph

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Metal - Released September 1, 2016 | Epitaph

England has produced many of metal’s best acts, whether it be the first real metal band in Black Sabbath, the genre-forwarding Judas Priest, or the shattering death metal of Carcass, but there have been few Brit metalcore bands to make any waves. Sheffield’s intense, dynamic Bring Me the Horizon aim to change that. Suicide Season states the case clearly. Intricately constructed and refreshingly unpredictable songs like the relentless “Chelsea Smile” and the stop-start riff-fest “Football Season Is Over” are never generic, and instead provide a roller coaster for the ears. In addition, the album-closing title track takes unexpected turns over eight thrill-filled minutes. ~ Tom Forget
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Rock - Released July 13, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released November 18, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released December 26, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released November 24, 2017 | Epitaph

Alternative & Indie - Released November 3, 2014 | Epitaph

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Metal - Released September 1, 2016 | Epitaph

In a nutshell: pretty boys making ugly music. Sheffield, England's Bring Me the Horizon sketch out their frantic, aggressive, skittish, retching, and often wonderful brand of metalcore with this debut EP -- aptly named This Is What the Edge of Your Seat Was Made For. Vocalist Oliver Sykes immediately establishes his English-ness with a desperate, grindcore-derived howl that says "You're stabbing me while I sing this" -- as opposed to the death metal growl preferred by most American metalcore bands, which says "I'm stabbing you while I sing this." He also backs up his typically stream-of-conscience lyrics with helpful explanations about their origins, which may or may not matter if you've come here for the band's very challenging, but never boring musical displays. Packed with killer-fudge riffs, dissonant squawks imitating horns from hell, and even occasional bits of straight-ahead thrash (see standout "Rawwwrr!!"), these obviously owe a great debt to bands like Job for a Cowboy and the Red Chord, among others, but Bring Me the Horizon, may just have enough personality to compete. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Metal - Released October 31, 2011 | Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 1, 2013 | Epitaph

Alternative & Indie - Released March 5, 2013 | Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2013 | Epitaph

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Metal - Released September 1, 2016 | Epitaph

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Metal - Released September 1, 2016 | Epitaph