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Country - Released February 16, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Brandi Carlile does not lay idle. Between her new life as a homosexual mother which she openly displays or her activism with the association War Child, she has found time to return to the studio for the sixth time. As a mother, the hallucination of an America at the edge of cracking infused the story of what she considers the most intense of her career. By The Way, I Forgive You, entwined by the evangelical theme of forgiveness, co-produced by Shooter Jennings (the son of the late Waylon) and Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton and Lori McKenna) succeeds the country folk of The Firewatcher's Daughter (2015). Ten tracks totalling 43 minutes, touching on topics such as Carlile's family, politics, identity and the faithful twin Hanseroth (Fightings Machinists). The strings were arranged by the late Paul Buckmaster (Elton John, David Bowie, Rolling Stone or Leonard Cohen) and its all packed into an emotional style of country made for a broad audience. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2007 | Columbia

One of the most appealing qualities of Brandi Carlile's debut album was that it had an ethereal quality, unattached to style or sound or time. Since she was a singer/songwriter playing an acoustic guitar, there were undoubtedly elements of folk, but Carlile's songwriting was elliptical and elastic, giving her plenty of room to indulge her powerful voice, a voice that had echoes of Jeff Buckley and Thom Yorke. This gave Brandi Carlile a spacey, dreamy quality, but for as good as it was, the album didn't achieve much attention initially apart from some rave reviews. Still, Carlile and the label slowly worked the record, getting some songs onto Grey's Anatomy as they laid the groundwork for her second album, The Story, which was designed to be her big breakthrough. Producer T-Bone Burnett -- a singer/songwriter in his own right, but better known as the man behind O Brother, Where Art Thou? and the man who helmed records for Counting Crows, Roy Orbison, Gillian Welch, and his wife Sam Phillips -- was brought aboard to help streamline some of Carlile's eccentricities without watering down her music, a task he performs admirably on The Story. Part of the streamlining process involves accentuating the arty undercurrents that ran throughout her debut -- a move that highlights her ambition and helps push her out of the rootless ether and into something that sounds distinctly contemporary. In other words, Carlile's Buckley and Yorke influences are brought to the forefront here -- not just in her soaring, neo-operatic vocals, either, but also how her writing is at once more brooding, dramatic, and open-ended than it was on the debut -- which makes her sound modern, if perhaps a bit too indebted to her idols. If Carlile openly wears her influences on her sleeve on The Story, she is nevertheless the rare songwriter who can hold her own with such idiosyncratic talents. Indeed, there's an earthiness to her music that keeps it from floating into willfully abstract territory, and if Burnett's dark, burnished production is a shade too dour -- this broods like it was 1995 -- it nevertheless is appropriate, capturing the mournful qualities of Carlile's songs and voice, along with the muscle the twin Hanseroth brothers bring as her support. The album's only flaw is that it's perhaps a little too monochromatic, a little too somber and sober in its presentation; a slight glimmer of sunlight or a dose of humor would have given this record some needed breathing room. That said, this dark, roiling collection fulfills the promise of her remarkable debut, offering resounding confirmation that Carlile is a singular talent. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2012 | Columbia

Named in honor of the converted turn-of-the-century Washington barn where it was recorded, Brandi Carlile's fourth studio outing, the rough and tumble, sweet and soulful Bear Creek, is as fiery as it is bucolic. Carlile's wonderfully expressive voice is as tailor-made for country as it is for roots rock, and the 13 cuts on Bear Creek lean heavily on the former, striking a nice balance between the nuanced twang of Alison Krauss and the bluesy cockiness of Bonnie Raitt, especially on the spirited, boot-stomping opener "Hard Way Home," the sweet and steady "Keep Your Heart Young," and the gospel-kissed howler "Raise Hell." The notion of diminishing youth (Carlile turned 30 during the making of the album) plays a pivotal role on Bear Creek, and contributes to some of its finest moments. Both "A Promise to Keep," with its soft cadence, deft fingerpicking, and stoic refrain of "The hill I'm walking up is getting good and steep," and the lush and languid closer "Just Kids" manage to bask in the sepia glow of nostalgia without disappearing into the past, which is an attribute that Carlile, with her old-school melodic sense and genuine flair for Roy Orbison/Patsy Cline melodrama, displayed with 2007's blistering future American Idol standard "The Story." Four albums in, Carlile has honed her distinctly retro brand of Northwest Americana down to science, and Bear Creek feels both easy and immediate, which is usually what happens when talented artists finally figure out who they are, and that heartache, failure, defiance, and confidence can all go to the dance together. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 13, 2006 | Red Ink - Columbia

The sticker affixed to the initial pressings of Brandi Carlile's eponymous 2005 major-label debut trumpet that the singer/songwriter is an "artist to watch" by Rolling Stone, Interview, and Paste. Those accolades, combined with cover artwork that captures her at her cutest -- as if she were a cousin of Rachael Leigh Cook -- might make some listeners suspicious of Carlile, since the cumulative effect makes her seem like a pretty, prepackaged creation. One listen to her absolutely terrific debut immediately dispels these notions. From the moment "Follow" seeps out of the speakers, it's clear that Carlile isn't a prefabricated pop star. For starters, she's a powerful, captivating vocalist, clearly influenced by Jeff Buckley, but lacking the mannered theatrical histrionics that could occasionally creep into his work. She's quieter and intimate, slowly pulling listeners into her tales of love and loss. While her words and topics may not be bracing, her music is: it's rich, warm, and seductive, familiar in its form and sound, yet sounding fresh, even original, particularly in how her folky singer/songwriter foundation blends with her art-pop inclinations. Her music ebbs and flows with long, languid melodies, strummed acoustic guitars, and her surging vocals, creating an album that's ideal for introspective, late-night listening. Carlile is supported by guitarist Tim Hanseroth and his bassist twin brother Phil (they're billed as "The Twins" in the production credits for the album), and they're not mere support, they're collaborators, co-writing several songs (Tim writes "What Can I Say" on his own), and giving the album the graceful, liquid musicality that makes it such a rewarding, addictive listen. The best thing about Brandi Carlile is that it not only doesn't sound like a debut, it sounds like a record that exists out of time and place -- which means it's not only a superb debut, it's a hell of a record by any measure. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released October 2, 2009 | Columbia

If there was any flaw with Brandi Carlile's second album, The Story, it's that it was perhaps a touch too austere, painted in amber tones by producer T Bone Burnett. Its 2009 sequel, Give Up the Ghost, opens up and breathes, perhaps partially due to swapping T Bone for Rick Rubin, who retains the spooky, serious vibe but makes things a little less chilly. This isn't sealed off; there is room for guests here, including such L.A. linchpins as Benmont Tench and Red Hot Chili Pepper Chad Smith, but also Elton John and his arranger, Paul Buckmaster. Tellingly, their presence is felt more than heard, as they never remove the spotlight from Carlile, who remains a singularly powerful singer/songwriter. When things are Spartan, her voice is haunting and gripping, wrenching out operatic emotions, but Give Up the Ghost trumps The Story because she allows herself to lighten up, to rock again on "Dreams" and jump into the rollicking "Caroline," which does indeed recall the barrelhouse jaunt of Honky Chateau. Carlile still prefers sobriety to levity but it never feels affected; it's music that gets under your skin and cuts to the bone. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2011 | Columbia

Recorded during her 2010 tour in support of Give Up the Ghost, this live album finds Brandi Carlile performing a mix of original songs and cover material alongside the Seattle Symphony. Carlile’s earthy pop/rock is a far cry from classical fare, perhaps, but the pairing doesn’t sound as odd as you’d think. With their cathartic melodies and storybook lyrics, her songs have always tended to fare equally well in acoustic settings and full-band arrangements. Backed by a full orchestra, they take on an anthemic quality while still highlighting everything that makes Carlile’s music so appealing, keeping the spotlight on her voice -- which has never sounded better -- and festooning it with all sorts of pretty flourishes. Occasionally, the symphony pulls away entirely, leaving Carlile and her longtime backing band -- including brothers Tim and Phil Hanseroth, who perform a spot-on cover of “The Sound of Silence” toward the end of the set -- to remind everyone what the core of this music sounds like. But Live at Benaroya Hall is more concerned with dressing up Carlile’s music in elegant, orchestral clothing, and the results are pretty stunning, from the grandeur of “The Story” -- now featuring horns, woodwinds, and strings -- to the graceful ebb and flow of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah,” which vacillates between simple guitar arpeggios and lush symphonic swells. This isn't Brandi Carlile's first concert album, but it's certainly the best. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo

Rock - Released May 5, 2017 | Legacy Recordings

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Country - Released February 16, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

Brandi Carlile does not lay idle. Between her new life as a homosexual mother which she openly displays or her activism with the association War Child, she has found time to return to the studio for the sixth time. As a mother, the hallucination of an America at the edge of cracking infused the story of what she considers the most intense of her career. By The Way, I Forgive You, entwined by the evangelical theme of forgiveness, co-produced by Shooter Jennings (the son of the late Waylon) and Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton and Lori McKenna) succeeds the country folk of The Firewatcher's Daughter (2015). Ten tracks totalling 43 minutes, touching on topics such as Carlile's family, politics, identity and the faithful twin Hanseroth (Fightings Machinists). The strings were arranged by the late Paul Buckmaster (Elton John, David Bowie, Rolling Stone or Leonard Cohen) and its all packed into an emotional style of country made for a broad audience. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 17, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Rock - Released January 10, 2006 | Red Ink - Columbia

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Rock - Released October 9, 2007 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released November 13, 2017 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

"[L]ead single 'The Joke' showcases some of Carlile’s finest lyricism and singing yet. Written for children born into this trying time, Carlile urges triumph over division." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 9, 2007 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released September 16, 2008 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 9, 2010 | Columbia

With Valentine's Day on the brain and bandmates Phil and Tim Hanseroth onboard, Brandi Carlile fills this short EP with two covers and three love-centric originals. © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 12, 2007 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 29, 2005 | Red Ink - Columbia

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Pop - Released February 2, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Pop - Released December 8, 2017 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Pop - Released January 19, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra