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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 13, 1990 | Tommy Boy Music, LLC

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Brand Nubian never sold as many albums as the many West Coast rappers burning up the charts in the early '90s, but the New York group commanded great respect in East Coast rap circles. In black neighborhoods of New York and Philadelphia, Nubian's debut album, One for All, was actually a bigger seller than many of the platinum gangsta rap releases outselling it on a national level. Influenced by De La Soul and the Jungle Brothers, Nubian favored an abstract rapping style, and Eastern rap fans were drawn to the complexity of jams like "Dance to My Ministry," "Ragtime," and "All for One." Grand Puba, Lord Jamar, and Sadat X had a lot of technique, which was what hip-hoppers favored in the East. On the whole, Nubian's Nation of Islam rhetoric isn't as overbearing as some of the recordings that other Five Percenters were delivering at the time. The CD is a bit uneven, but on the whole is likable and exhilarating. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 1, 1998 | Arista

Foundation, the first album since Brand Nubian's 1990 debut to feature all four original members, is an incredible return to form. The rhymes by Grand Puba, Sadat X, and Lord Jamar are as striking as they were on the group's breakout, and the focus on message tracks is a refreshing turn from the rap world's played-out tales of thug life. "Don't Let It Go to Your Head" is a cautionary tale for arrogant one-hit rappers, while "Probable Cause" is a scathing attack on the notorious tactics of the New Jersey State Police and "I'm Black and I'm Proud" is an enjoyable roots epic. There are plenty of simple feel-good tracks as well, although those omnipresent Wu-Tang strings appear on several songs (just as on every other major rap album released in 1998). The group ably manages to sidestep another late-'90s rap cliché, enlisting a different outside producer for each track. Though Foundation is no different -- featuring DJ Premiere, Lord Finesse, and Chris "CL" Liggio, among others -- most of the best tracks were helmed by Nubian members Grand Puba or DJ Alamo. Of the few N.Y.C. rap acts still left a decade on from rap's golden age, Brand Nubian sound the freshest. © John Bush /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 12, 1993 | Tommy Boy Music, LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 1, 1998 | Arista

Foundation, the first album since Brand Nubian's 1990 debut to feature all four original members, is an incredible return to form. The rhymes by Grand Puba, Sadat X, and Lord Jamar are as striking as they were on the group's breakout, and the focus on message tracks is a refreshing turn from the rap world's played-out tales of thug life. "Don't Let It Go to Your Head" is a cautionary tale for arrogant one-hit rappers, while "Probable Cause" is a scathing attack on the notorious tactics of the New Jersey State Police and "I'm Black and I'm Proud" is an enjoyable roots epic. There are plenty of simple feel-good tracks as well, although those omnipresent Wu-Tang strings appear on several songs (just as on every other major rap album released in 1998). The group ably manages to sidestep another late-'90s rap cliché, enlisting a different outside producer for each track. Though Foundation is no different -- featuring DJ Premiere, Lord Finesse, and Chris "CL" Liggio, among others -- most of the best tracks were helmed by Nubian members Grand Puba or DJ Alamo. Of the few N.Y.C. rap acts still left a decade on from rap's golden age, Brand Nubian sound the freshest. © John Bush /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 4, 2020 | Tommy Boy Music, LLC

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Brand Nubian never sold as many albums as the many West Coast rappers burning up the charts in the early '90s, but the New York group commanded great respect in East Coast rap circles. In black neighborhoods of New York and Philadelphia, Nubian's debut album, One for All, was actually a bigger seller than many of the platinum gangsta rap releases outselling it on a national level. Influenced by De La Soul and the Jungle Brothers, Nubian favored an abstract rapping style, and Eastern rap fans were drawn to the complexity of jams like "Dance to My Ministry," "Ragtime," and "All for One." Grand Puba, Lord Jamar, and Sadat X had a lot of technique, which was what hip-hoppers favored in the East. On the whole, Nubian's Nation of Islam rhetoric isn't as overbearing as some of the recordings that other Five Percenters were delivering at the time. The CD is a bit uneven, but on the whole is likable and exhilarating. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 11, 1994 | Tommy Boy Music, LLC

Brand Nubian cover a wide variety of styles and issues on this album. Their message is positive, but they come down hard on stereotypes and blacks killing other blacks. Sampling from rock and jazz alike, the group's scratchy rhythms are a good complement to the lyrics. © John Bush /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 29, 1998 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 11, 1994 | Tommy Boy Music, LLC

Brand Nubian cover a wide variety of styles and issues on this album. Their message is positive, but they come down hard on stereotypes and blacks killing other blacks. Sampling from rock and jazz alike, the group's scratchy rhythms are a good complement to the lyrics. © John Bush /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 29, 1998 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 21, 2010 | Brand Nubian - iHipHop Distribution

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 15, 2009 | One Leg Up Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 21, 2010 | Babygrande Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 21, 2010 | Babygrande Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 10, 2004 | Babygrande Records

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Rock - Released April 19, 2005 | Tommy Boy Music, LLC