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Blues - Released July 27, 2018 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

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After Memphis in 2013 and A Fool To Care in 2015, Boz Scaggs concludes his trilogy on American roots music with Out of the Blues. Properly charged with southern blues and soul, here is a preview of the music that has inspired him throughout his career. With − at his side − talents such as Ray Parker, Jr. and Arc Angels’ leaders, Charlie Sexton and Doyle Bramhall II, as well as Willie Weeks (bass), Jim Keltner (drums) and Jim Cox (keyboards). Ideal conditions to bring old blues back to life… Over the nine tracks, four were composed by Jack 'Applejack' Walroth, Scaggs’ former teammate, most notably on Memphis. For the rest, the album features Don Robey’s I’ve Just Got To Forget You, Neil Young’s On The Beach, and Jimmy Read’s Down In Virginia. Boz Scaggs seems to be particularly at ease when it comes to soak in an entire era. Sixties soul is indeed a part of Those Lies, but quite modern at the same time. Some noticeable similarities with James Hunter at times, but the American singer sets himself apart thanks to his unique voice, cementing his status as a bluesman. Gritty guitars and muddy blues, the harmonica riffs unwearyingly travel back and forth America. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Blues - Released July 27, 2018 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

After Memphis in 2013 and A Fool To Care in 2015, Boz Scaggs concludes his trilogy on American roots music with Out of the Blues. Properly charged with southern blues and soul, here is a preview of the music that has inspired him throughout his career. With − at his side − talents such as Ray Parker, Jr. and Arc Angels’ leaders, Charlie Sexton and Doyle Bramhall II, as well as Willie Weeks (bass), Jim Keltner (drums) and Jim Cox (keyboards). Ideal conditions to bring old blues back to life… Over the nine tracks, four were composed by Jack 'Applejack' Walroth, Scaggs’ former teammate, most notably on Memphis. For the rest, the album features Don Robey’s I’ve Just Got To Forget You, Neil Young’s On The Beach, and Jimmy Read’s Down In Virginia. Boz Scaggs seems to be particularly at ease when it comes to soak in an entire era. Sixties soul is indeed a part of Those Lies, but quite modern at the same time. Some noticeable similarities with James Hunter at times, but the American singer sets himself apart thanks to his unique voice, cementing his status as a bluesman. Gritty guitars and muddy blues, the harmonica riffs unwearyingly travel back and forth America. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Released April 19, 2002 | Columbia - Legacy

Both artistically and commercially, Boz Scaggs had his greatest success with Silk Degrees. The laid-back singer hit the R&B charts in a big way with the addictive, sly "Lowdown" (which has been sampled by more than a few rappers and remains a favorite among baby-boomer soul fans) and expressed his love of smooth soul music almost as well on the appealing "What Can I Say." But Scaggs was essentially a pop/rocker, and in that area he has a considerable amount of fun on "Lido Shuffle" (another major hit single), "What Do You Want the Girl to Do," and "Jump Street." Meanwhile, "We're All Alone" and "Harbor Lights" became staples on adult contemporary radio. Though not remarkable, the ballads have more heart than most of the bland material dominating that format. ~ Alex Henderson
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Pop - Released March 21, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

Boz Scaggs was subjected to a double-disc retrospective in 1997 with the excellent My Time: The Anthology (1969-1997). That was a lavish archival project, whereas 2013's Essential is part of Sony's ongoing one-size-fits-all series, but it's nevertheless the superior set, containing all but six of that 33-track collection's cuts in its 32 songs. Naturally, Essential covers more ground than My Time, going all the way up to 2013's fine Memphis LP, but it also digs slightly deeper into Boz's early years (it also helps that "Loan Me a Dime" is placed toward the front of the first disc instead of the back). This greater scope, combined with all the classic hits -- "Dinah Flo," "Slow Dancer," "What Can I Say," "Lowdown," "Lido Shuffle," "JoJo" -- makes this something close to a truly essential Boz Scaggs. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca Crossover

From his late 1960s days as the lead singer of the Steve Miller Band, Boz Scaggs has always had an undercurrent of jazz influence in his phrasing. Therefore, SPEAK LOW should come as no surprise to longtime fans. No mere raid on the Great American Songbook in the manner of Rod Stewart's adult contemporary albums, SPEAK LOW is a personal, canny follow-up to 2003's collection of standards, BUT BEAUTIFUL. These 12 tracks offer less familiar tracks like Duke Ellington's "Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me" and Chet Baker's "She Was Too Good To Me," given abstract, cerebral arrangements in the manner of 1950s Gil Evans charts.
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Pop - Released January 1, 2005 | Virgin Records

Fade into Light is a stellar album. It features unplugged and redone performances from Scaggs' classic Some Change, Silk Degrees, and Middle Man, as well as some new tunes. The unplugged tunes include readings of "Dirty Lowdown" and "Simone." "Harbor Lights" is changed significantly as well, in that the disco riff in its ending has been replaced by smooth jazz. "Sierra" is a remarkable redo that gives the tune a completely different feel. "Just Go" has Scaggs playing almost everything on the track, and it is one of his most nakedly emotional performances committed to tape. The sheer brokenness in his voice reveals a depth and dimension in the performance that takes the listener deep into the lyric. It is followed by a sultry, nocturnal read of "Love T.K.O." that reveals his deep authority, allowing the lyric to speak through him, not because of him. There is an authority here that allows the vast emotion in the song to be read through the spirit of acceptance, and it all lies in his nuance and phrasing. It's so inspired, offering a view of the many sides of Scaggs as a singer, that Fade into Light is a must for anyone even remotely interested in Boz Scaggs. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released January 1, 1994 | Virgin Records

When Boz Scaggs signed with Virgin Records after spending at least 17 years with Columbia, listeners had no idea what to expect. Some Change proved to be a pleasant surprise. Instead of going out of his way to be as slick and commercial as possible or offering something contrived and robotic, the singer-turned-restaurant-owner let his better instincts win out and delivered a very honest and natural-sounding collection of pop, pop/rock, and soul-influenced pop. On songs ranging from the smooth "I'll Be the One" (which has a slightly Average White Band-ish appeal) and the haunting "Sierra" to the ominous "Follow That Man," there's no question that Scaggs is coming from the heart. Arguably, Some Change is his best album since 1976's Silk Degrees. ~ Alex Henderson
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Blues - Released January 1, 1997 | Virgin

On this prime collection of R&B and blues songs and influences from Boz Scaggs' youth -- and four new yet classic-sounding self-penned originals -- the blue-eyed soulman eschews the slick production values of his pop chart-toppers such as "Lido" and "Lowdown," instead getting way down and his hands dirty with the honest blood, sweat, and tears of the real down-home blues. Packing in tow drummer Jim Keltner, guitarist Fred Tackett (from Little Feat), and slow-burning, soulful horn arrangements by Willie Mitchell, one of the founding fathers of Memphis soul (and composer of Come On Home's title track), Scaggs' covers of songs originally composed and performed by such legends as Jimmy Reed ("Found Love"), T-Bone Walker (the legendary "T-Bone Shuffle"), Sonny Boy Williamson ("Early in the Morning") and Bobby "Blue" Bland (the thunderous "Ask Me 'Bout Nothing (But the Blues)"), along with "It All Went Down the Drain" (Earl King), and the smoldering "Your Good Thing (Is About to End)" (David Porter with Isaac Hayes), are absolutely impossible to resist. Come On Home is a genuine musical treasure. ~ Chris Slawecki
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Pop/Rock - Released October 14, 1997 | Columbia - Legacy

On his fourth album My Time, Boz Scaggs' pop side truly begins to surface in earnest -- or, rather, he begins to channel his smooth soul into a pop package, pushing the funky workouts that dominated the previous Boz & Band toward the background and putting emphasis directly on the song. There's still a bit of grit here -- "Full-Lock Power Slide" charges forward on blaring guitars and organs -- but Scaggs takes a cue from "Hello My Lover" and "Freedom for the Stallion," the Allen Toussaint tunes he covers here, and gives this an easy, relaxed feel, one that's classy and seductive without being gauche. This is elegant, soulful music, with Scaggs effortlessly hitting his marks on both the strutting "Hello My Lover" and his original heartbreak ballad "Might Have to Cry." One of the best things about My Time is how his impeccably chosen covers fit seamlessly with his originals, to the point that it's hard to tell that "Old Time Lovin'" is an Al Green tune, which also points out Scaggs growth as a songwriter. And not only are his songs getting better, they're getting more distinctive and, in retrospect, the cheerful "We're Gonna Roll," and especially the opening "Dinah Flo," point the way toward Silk Degrees. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released March 5, 2013 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

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Pop/Rock - Released August 19, 1986 | Columbia

Featuring his would-be-soulman sound, Slow Dancer finds Boz Scaggs straddling the apparently fine line between Van Morrison and Isaac Hayes. While Silk Degrees is often touted as Scaggs' best '70s album -- based largely upon the chart success of "Lowdown" -- Slow Dancer features just as many catchy melodic tunes that meld a kind of boogie pub rock with an organic urban soul. Produced by Motown regular Johnny Bristol, Scaggs delivers some of his best performances on the Bristol-penned track "Pain of Love" and the Neil Young meets Marvin Gaye ballad "Sail on White Moon." ~ Matt Collar
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Pop - Released May 5, 2017 | Legacy Recordings

Pop - Released March 25, 2016 | Westmill

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Pop/Rock - Released October 13, 1998 | Columbia - Legacy

1980's Middle Man was Boz Scaggs' last album for Columbia before an eight-year self-imposed sabbatical. Scaggs nonetheless caps off the decade with equal nods to his '70s hitmaking formulas and the newer, shinier production techniques of the coming decade. The synthesizer rocker "Angel You" and the title track are given the full in-vogue androgynous (i.e., Hall & Oates) treatment, while the opener "Jo Jo" and "Simone" are pages taken from his Here's the Low Down-era grooves that wedded soulful vocals against a flurry of jazz changes. His penchant for the ballad is explored on "You Can Have Me Any Time" and "Isn't It Time," while his seldom-seen rockier side comes up for air on the bluesy "Breakdown Dead Ahead" and "You Got Some Imagination," both featuring stinging guitar from Steve Lukather. Not his best album, but a very timely one. ~ Cub Koda
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Rock - Released August 19, 1986 | Columbia

With 1974's Slow Dancer, produced by Johnny Bristol, Scaggs recast himself as a more R&B-infused singer. 1976's multi-million-selling Silk Degrees found Scaggs' switch paying off commercially, displaying enough skills and chops that the odious "blue-eyed soul" tag was deemed passé. This is noticeably more detached than Silk Degrees. And although this set is indeed quirky, the often unsurprising production featuring almost-on-cue guitar solos makes this album more "mainstream" than it had to be. "Still Falling for You" kicks the album off and sets the standard for the skilled, seamless production juxtaposed to meandering, almost incoherent lyrics. The melodic "A Clue," the best of the released singles, attains the offhanded cool and tunefulness that most of this set is striving for. Although this set is more soulful throughout than Silk Degrees, nothing sticks out like "What Can I Say." More than anything, this album puts the spotlight on Scaggs' romantic views, but they are so all over the road it's hard to tell what he really thinks. On the lush "We're Waiting," a listener may not have an idea of what he's talking about, but his vocal inflections say what the lyrics fail to. After a while, Scaggs seems to give up on making this a statement about love and offers some so-so rockers. In particular, the strongly produced "1993" has Scaggs imagining a drastically changed world as he sings, "Before they take me up/They'll have to alter, alter me." Down Two Then Left has a melancholy appeal much like Al Green Is Love and Joni Mitchell's Hissing of Summer Lawns, but a few concessions prevent this from being in their elite class. ~ Jason Elias
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Rock - Released May 1, 1988 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rock - Released March 31, 2015 | Savoy

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Rock - Released May 1, 1971 | Columbia - Legacy

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released February 14, 1976 | Columbia

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