Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released January 1, 1969 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
The difference between Blood, Sweat & Tears and the group's preceding long-player, Child Is Father to the Man, is the difference between a monumental seller and a record that was "merely" a huge critical success. Arguably, the Blood, Sweat & Tears that made this self-titled second album -- consisting of five of the eight original members and four newcomers, including singer David Clayton-Thomas -- was really a different group from the one that made Child Is Father to the Man, which was done largely under the direction of singer/songwriter/keyboard player/arranger Al Kooper. They had certain similarities to the original: the musical mixture of classical, jazz, and rock elements was still apparent, and the interplay between the horns and the keyboards was still occurring, even if those instruments were being played by different people. Kooper was even still present as an arranger on two tracks, notably the initial hit "You've Made Me So Very Happy." But the second BS&T, under the aegis of producer James William Guercio, was a less adventurous unit, and, as fronted by Clayton-Thomas, a far more commercial one. Not only did the album contain three songs that neared the top of the charts as singles -- "Happy," "Spinning Wheel," and "And When I Die" -- but the whole album, including an arrangement of "God Bless the Child" and the radical rewrite of Traffic's "Smiling Phases," was wonderfully accessible. It was a repertoire to build a career on, and Blood, Sweat & Tears did exactly that, although they never came close to equaling this album. © William Ruhlmann & Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released February 1, 1968 | Columbia - Legacy

From
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released February 1, 1972 | Columbia - Legacy

Sometimes, a greatest-hits set is timed perfectly to gather together a group's most successful and familiar performances just at the point when that group has passed the point of their maximum exposure to the public, but before the public memory has had a chance to fade. That was the case when Columbia Records assembled this compilation for release in early 1972. At that point, Blood, Sweat & Tears had released four albums and scored six Top 40 hits, each of which is heard here. But lead singer David Clayton-Thomas had just quit the group, so that the unit that recorded songs like "You've Made Me So Very Happy" was not working together anymore. And even when Clayton-Thomas returned, the band would continue to decline commercially. As such, BS&T's Greatest Hits captures the band's peak in 11 selections--seven singles chart entries, plus two album tracks from the celebrated debut album when Al Kooper helmed the group, and two more from the Grammy-winning multi-platinum second album. Using the short singles edits of songs like "And When I Die" emphasizes their radio-ready punch over the more extended suitelike arrangements on the albums, but this selection gains in focus what it lacks in ambition. For the millions who learned to love BS&T in 1969 when they were all over AM radio, this is the ideal selection of their most accessible material. (A later CD reissue of Blood, Sweat & Tears' Greatest Hits replaced each singles edit with the original full-length version.) © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released August 2, 1987 | Columbia

Blood, Sweat & Tears had a hard act to follow in recording their third album. Nevertheless, BS&T constructed a convincing, if not quite as impressive, companion to their previous hit. David Clayton-Thomas remained an enthusiastic blues shouter, and the band still managed to put together lively arrangements, especially on the Top 40 hits "Hi-De-Ho" and "Lucretia Mac Evil." Elsewhere, they re-created the previous album's jazzing up of Laura Nyro ("He's a Runner") and Traffic ("40,000 Headmen"), although their pretentiousness, on the extended "Symphony/Sympathy for the Devil," and their tendency to borrow other artists' better-known material (James Taylor's "Fire and Rain") rather than generating more of their own, were warning signs for the future. In the meantime, BS&T 3 was another chart-topping gold hit. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
From
CD$22.49

Pop/Rock - Released November 7, 1995 | Legacy - Columbia

Blood, Sweat & Tears' 11-track Greatest Hits album, released in February 1972, contained all of the group's six Top 40 singles, plus notable tracks from its two best albums, Child Is Father to the Man and Blood, Sweat & Tears. Almost 24 years later came this 32-track, 138-and-a-half-minute, double-CD expansion, much of it extraneous. Where Greatest Hits contained the single edits of songs like "You've Made Me So Very Happy" and "And When I Die," here "all titles are original album versions," as the back cover notes, which means the jazzy interludes, frequently having nothing to do with the rest of the song, remain. There are a couple of unreleased tracks, and otherwise the bloated running time was filled out by, for example, four tracks from the 1972 stiff New Blood, which didn't even feature singer David Clayton-Thomas. Legacy would have better served consumers by either expanding the original 41-minute Greatest Hits to proper CD length with a few bonus tracks, or reissuing the first two albums in a double-disc set, again with a few bonus tracks to fill up the time. This compilation did not enhance the band's reputation. And the error-filled liner notes are less than worthless. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
From
HI-RES$13.59
CD$11.99

Rock - Released July 26, 2019 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released June 1, 1971 | Legacy - Columbia

From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released May 23, 1976 | Legacy Recordings

From
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Avenue Records

This 1980 edition of rock's longest-running horn band is definitely not your father's Blood, Sweat & Tears. Frontman David Clayton-Thomas is still on board, but everybody else is new. The musical emphasis has mostly shifted, from pop/soul with a jazz flavor to out-and-out fusion jazz, such as "Agitato," and the lengthy and often quite lovely "Spanish Wine" suite, with only an occasional lead vocal (a radically re-arranged cover of Jimi Hendrix's "Manic Depression"). Big exceptions include the title tune, in which Clayton-Thomas vents his paranoia about Three Mile Island, and an impassioned, if relatively straightforward, cover of the old blues standard "I'll Drown In My Own Tears." © TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released March 12, 1973 | Legacy Recordings

From
CD$19.49

Rock - Released April 4, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

From
CD$21.99

Blues - Released November 18, 2020 | Avenue Records

If it has horns and David Clayton Thomas is the lead singer, does that make it Blood, Sweat & Tears? That's the question posed on this 1980 concert set, in which Thomas fronts a set of young musicians, none of whom played on any of the band's hit albums. Whatever you call them, though, there's been a major change in direction. This edition of BS&T is for all intents a fusion jazz band; in fact, the bulk of the album, the "Spanish Wine" suite, is an extended piece that inhabits a musical neighborhood somewhere near Weather Report. Old fans will be pleased to learn that there's also an enthusiastic medley of the band's best known songs, and later Thomas makes a return to his blues roots on an impassioned reading of "I'll Drown in My Own Tears." © TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released March 1, 1975 | Legacy Recordings

From
CD$7.99

Rock - Released February 16, 2004 | Columbia - Legacy

This imported double-CD set is a bit difficult to evaluate because it is so strange (and, at times, cheesy) in its design. The 72-minute first disc is devoted to David Clayton-Thomas' tenure with the group, containing 17 songs covering the best-known tracks from their second album, Blood, Sweat & Tears, right up through their 1976 rendition of "Got to Get You Into My Life" and beyond, up as far as "Katie Bell" and "Sweet Sadie the Savior," several membership changes later. As with the domestic greatest-hits compilation, the songs are all the album edits; the producers were obviously working within the confines of a restricted budget, because apart from "Got to Get You Into My Life" -- which, one assumes, is a no-brainer in terms of an investment -- the later tracks are all drawn from old 16-bit masters, a fact declared in the packaging, which otherwise has no information or annotation whatsoever. The 26-minute second ("bonus") disc offers four tracks by the original, Al Kooper-led band, and "More and More" and "Symphony for the Devil/Sympathy for the Devil," featuring David Clayton-Thomas. The whole thing is a bit of a mess, though in the European market (where What Goes Up: The Best of Blood, Sweat & Tears is not available), it probably makes sense -- for the rest of the world, it's nothing but an attractively packaged, not too well-devised compilation. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
CD$9.99

Rock - Released May 22, 2015 | Sony Music Entertainment

From
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 24, 2008 | Sony BMG Music Entertainment

From
CD$18.49

Rock - Released May 23, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

Rock - Released October 15, 2019 | SHOCKWAVES

Download not available
From
CD$1.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | SOFA - AV Catalog PS

From
CD$1.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | SOFA - AV Catalog PS