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Country - Released March 26, 2013 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released October 23, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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The title Re-Loaded: 20 #1 Hits slyly winks at Blake Shelton's first hits collection, Loaded: The Best of Blake Shelton. Released in time for the holiday season of 2010, a lot has happened between that compilation and this 2015 collection -- namely, Shelton has turned into a household name thanks to his starring role on NBC's televised music competition The Voice (not to mention his headline-grabbing romance with Miranda Lambert), and he's had the hits to go along with his fame. According to Billboard's U.S. Country Airplay charts, he had precisely 12 number one hits from the three albums he's released since Loaded and they're all here, sequenced in reverse-chronological order beginning with "Sangria," running through the smooth-rolling "Sure Be Cool If You Did" and the modulated rowdiness of "Boys Round Here," and ending with "Honey Bee," the smash that hit in 2011 just as the singer started on The Voice. Next up are his eight number ones from the 2000s -- "Hillbilly Bone," "She Wouldn't Be Gone," "Home," "Some Beach," "The Baby," and "Austin" -- finally concluding with the nicely laid-back, grooving "Gonna," a song that underscores how Shelton easily transitioned from traditionalist to mainstream crooner. By focusing so heavily on his 2010s, the rest of Reloaded also emphasizes this shift, and leaves behind many of the great, brawnier singles he had from the 2000s, but that's a fair trade-off: not only will this collection appeal to 2010s converts, it is true to who Shelton is in 2015. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released May 20, 2016 | Warner Bros.

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Blake Shelton veered toward the somnolent on the quite pleasing Bringing Back the Sunshine so it's not entirely surprising its 2016 sequel, If I'm Honest, is a bit crisper and livelier. Some of this brightening in attitude may be due to him lightening his load following a much-publicized 2015 divorce from singer Miranda Lambert -- certainly the title suggests it's time for the singer to get down to what's real -- but the electronic sheen and good times also feel like a reaction to Shelton sliding too deeply into softness. If If I'm Honest is indeed a divorce album, it's a Back in the High Life, not a Blood on the Tracks: Shelton is seizing the day, embracing his new lease on life with renewed vigor and a new love, who just happens to stop by to sing "Go Ahead and Break My Heart." Gwen Stefani's presence offers a reminder that Shelton stars on the televised singing competition The Voice, and If I'm Honest is targeted more at the mainstream audience attracted by the show than country radio proper. That's evident not only on "Go Ahead and Break My Heart," which is an adult contemporary hit by any other name, but also a song featured in The Angry Birds Movie ("Friends," a pop tune graced by banjo), a preponderance of glimmering ballads, and smirking good-old-boy humor. Set aside "Doing It to Country Songs," a bit of single-entendre smut inexplicably graced by the Oak Ridge Boys: Shelton usually has enough swagger to let these jokes land with a crooked smile, evidenced by the heavy-handed wordplay of "She's Got a Way with Words" and the not necessarily pro-environment puns of "Green." Shelton remains appealing when he raises a little hell -- and "Straight Outta Cold Beer" deliberately raises no more than a little hell -- but like Bringing Back the Sunshine before it, If I'm Honest is at its core a balladeer's record, and Shelton pulls off these romance tunes with a sly, masculine grace that complements the album's sleek modern surfaces. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released November 3, 2017 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released September 30, 2014 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released November 18, 2008 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released September 30, 2014 | Warner Bros.

There was a sense that Blake Shelton needed to prove he was still country on 2013's Based on a True Story, the first album he recorded after turning into a television superstar thanks to his starring role on The Voice. Despite the macho boasts of "Boys Round Here" -- the record's biggest hit -- the songs from True Story that charted were largely ballads, which may be the reason why the album's quick follow-up, Bringing Back the Sunshine, relies on sweetness, not swagger. Underneath the gloss, there are remnants of redneck rhetoric -- drinks mixed in Sonic cups, a reliance on a corny backwoods growl on "Buzzin'" -- but they're just the accent, not the foundation. At its core, Bringing Back the Sunshine is a middlebrow makeout record that can double as a fine morning tonic. Nothing here rocks (although the closing "Just Gettin' Started" tries to work up a full head of steam), nothing is gritty, even the ode to a "Good Country Song," which isn't a slice of hardcore honky tonk but rather a slow-burner in the vein of Keith Whitley and Earl Thomas Conley, who are both name-checked in the tune. This insistent mellowness is the strength of Bringing Back the Sunshine. Shelton has an easy touch with a ballad and he never gets subsumed in the thick overdubs of his midtempo pop songs because his warm, resonant voice anchors them both, making them seem slightly more substantial than mere cannily crafted contemporary country-pop. Yet, that's exactly what Bringing Back the Sunshine is: a state-of-the art country-pop record, a modern update of urban cowboy that works because it never hides its soft aspirations but never makes a fuss about them either. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released March 29, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released May 27, 2016 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released October 23, 2015 | Warner Bros.

The title Re-Loaded: 20 #1 Hits slyly winks at Blake Shelton's first hits collection, Loaded: The Best of Blake Shelton. Released in time for the holiday season of 2010, a lot has happened between that compilation and this 2015 collection -- namely, Shelton has turned into a household name thanks to his starring role on NBC's televised music competition The Voice (not to mention his headline-grabbing romance with Miranda Lambert), and he's had the hits to go along with his fame. According to Billboard's U.S. Country Airplay charts, he had precisely 12 number one hits from the three albums he's released since Loaded and they're all here, sequenced in reverse-chronological order beginning with "Sangria," running through the smooth-rolling "Sure Be Cool If You Did" and the modulated rowdiness of "Boys Round Here," and ending with "Honey Bee," the smash that hit in 2011 just as the singer started on The Voice. Next up are his eight number ones from the 2000s -- "Hillbilly Bone," "She Wouldn't Be Gone," "Home," "Some Beach," "The Baby," and "Austin" -- finally concluding with the nicely laid-back, grooving "Gonna," a song that underscores how Shelton easily transitioned from traditionalist to mainstream crooner. By focusing so heavily on his 2010s, the rest of Reloaded also emphasizes this shift, and leaves behind many of the great, brawnier singles he had from the 2000s, but that's a fair trade-off: not only will this collection appeal to 2010s converts, it is true to who Shelton is in 2015. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 6, 2017 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released July 12, 2011 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released November 16, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released August 25, 2017 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released November 30, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Country - Released November 3, 2017 | Warner Bros.

Texoma Shore is a shout-out to the beaches of Lake Texoma, a body of water that's close to where Blake Shelton grew up. It's also near where he recorded this, his tenth studio album, and if there's an implicit homecoming in his choice of naming the record after his old stomping grounds, it's a sentiment that can't be heard in the music. Relaxed and easy, Texoma Shore is the sound of "Blake Shelton: Superstar," the good ol' boy who made good in Hollywood. His paramour and Voice co-star Gwen Stefani isn't heard, but she's felt, specifically in the album's deft blend of glamour and comfort, but also in a fleeting lyric reference to Stefani's endorsement deal for a specific cosmetic line. This line undercuts Shelton's occasional attempt at down-home charm, particularly on the disingenuous "Money," a song where he and his girl aren't able to afford Charmin, sport second hand cut-offs/ and leave "the doors unlocked because there's nothing left to steal." The tell in "Money" is how he dreams of sipping sake at Nobu, a reference that flows easily from Shelton's lips because he's now a celebrity, not a mere country star. He acts this way throughout Texoma Shore, sanding the twang out of his voice -- it only surfaces when things get a little rowdy but things only get a little rowdy, and not that often -- and opting for a polish so slick it shines. What distinguishes Texoma Shore from its predecessor, If I'm Honest, is that it's a groove album, not a collection of ballads. Shelton sounds settled and happy, singing about longterm romances and memories, the kind of songs that reflect a relaxed middle age. There are some surprises to be found in the production by Scott Hendricks -- notably, "Beside You Babe" has a nimble R&B beat and "Turnin' Me On," the only song co-written by Shelton, plays like Lindsey Buckingham producing Alabama in 1982 -- and that's enough to make Texoma Shore into a cozy record that's not complacent. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released July 31, 2001 | Warner Bros. - Nashville

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Country - Released November 8, 2010 | Reprise

Loaded: The Best of Blake Shelton, is a solid collection of the country singer's singles, hits, and favorites from his five studio full-lengths, and the two six-track EPs he released in the latter year. Fifteen tracks deep, it begins with the two cuts that put him on contemporary country's radar -- "Ol Red" and "Austin" -- from his self-titled debut album in 2001. The Dreamer, from 2003, is represented by the its two best cuts, "The Baby," and the classic "Playboys of the Southwestern World." There are three from 2004's Blake Shelton's Bar & Grill, including Shawn Camp's stellar "Nobody But Me," and Shelton's reading of the Conway Twitty smash "Goodbye Time." Pure BS, from 2007, is showcased by a pair of numbers, including "The More I Drink" and a third, "Home," comes from the deluxe edition of album. There's a solid version of "She Wouldn't Be Gone" from 2008's Startin' Fires to round things out. The first 11 tracks were a given, and Shelton's annotations in the booklet make a solid case for their inclusion. That said, Shelton also tacks on the title track from the Hillbilly Bone, "Six Pack," as well as "Kiss My Country Ass" from the same set. Further, "Who Are You When I'm Not Looking" and the title track from the second EP are here. All four of these songs were released earlier in the calendar year, making their appearances seem redundant at best and, frankly, like a cynical money grab at worst. Oftentimes, less really is more. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released December 6, 2013 | Warner Bros.

Country - Released September 8, 2017 | Warner Bros.

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