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Rock - Released June 30, 1975 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
Drummer Billy Cobham was fresh from his success with the Mahavishnu Orchestra when he recorded his debut album, which is still his best. Most of the selections showcase Cobham in a quartet with keyboardist Jan Hammer, guitarist Tommy Bolin, and electric bassist Lee Sklar. Two other numbers include Joe Farrell on flute and soprano and trumpeter Jimmy Owens with guitarist John Tropea, Hammer, bassist Ron Carter, and Ray Barretto on congas. The generally high-quality compositions (which include "Red Baron") make this fusion set a standout, a strong mixture of rock-ish rhythms and jazz improvising. ~ Scott Yanow
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Rock - Released September 25, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released June 30, 1975 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released December 14, 2016 | Nicolosiproductions - soul Trade

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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released June 1, 2015 | Fusion

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Jazz - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

After a string of successful solo efforts, Billy Cobham began to slip into mediocrity beginning with this recording, originally released in 1975. While elements of funk were always a part of his band's sound, it was now the primary focus. "Panhandler" stands out as the session's most memorable composition, while Milcho Leviev contributes nicely on "Moody Modes." Cobham fans will want to seek this out for the extended drum solo "A Funky Kind of Thing," which stands as one of the most original drum solos he ever recorded. Of particular interest here is the presence of John Scofield, who had replaced John Abercrombie. Not up to the standards of its predecessors, but a worthy purchase. ~ Robert Taylor
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released May 18, 2016 | Nicolosi productions

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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released June 15, 2015 | Groove

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Jazz - Released June 30, 1975 | Rhino Atlantic

Billy Cobham's second date as a leader was one of his better sessions. Four songs (all originals by the leader/drummer) comprise "Spanish Moss -- A Sound Portrait," and, in addition, Cobham contributed three other pieces. The selections team him with guitarist John Abercrombie, both of the Brecker Brothers, trombonist Garnett Brown, keyboardist George Duke, bassist John Williams, and Latin percussionist Lee Pastora. In general, the melodies and the vamps are reasonably memorable. Cobham also takes an unaccompanied drum solo on "Storm." Worth searching for by fusion collectors. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released June 19, 2015 | Nicolosiproductions - soul Trade

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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released May 20, 2015 | Fusion

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Jazz - Released September 16, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

Billy Cobham had always incorporated elements of disco and funk into his solo recordings; however, this is the most painful example. Even his die-hard fans haven't forgiven him for this embarrassment. "Oh, Mendocino" and "What Is Your Fantasy" are pure disco, while "Bring Up the House Lights" is a ridiculous dialogue with George Duke during which they actually poke fun of Alphonse Mouzon's wardrobe. "A Little Travelin' Music" is the only song with any integrity, while "Vlastar - An Encounter" is a typical Cobham solo. Cross the street to avoid this one. ~ Robert Taylor
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released June 1, 2015 | Fusion

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Jazz - Released May 16, 2014 | Varese Sarabande

Cobham's tenure in Mahavishnu Orchestra was fast becoming ancient history when POWER PLAY, his second long-player on GRP, was released. He was already being discovered by a whole new audience opened up via "adult contemporary" radio programming, but that particular audience, in its ignorance of Cobham's previous claim to fame, failed to see beyond the GRP borderlines. The point is that POWER PLAY is, in fact, one of the most sophisticated, immediately likeable, technically proficient, and simply strongest albums drummer Cobham's ever released. His compositional skills are brought mightily to the fore along with his adroit touch with all manner of percussion, acoustic and electronic. Ignore the new-ageisms inherent in the title "Zanzibar Breeze," and instead revel in the soaring, futuristic rhythms and varied hues of electronic pastels wafting amidst the beats. This could almost be a softer Cybotron-ish pre-techno lite. Then there's the stompin' polyrhythmic thrust of "Radioactive" and the tribal fusion flexing its ethnic muscle on the "Summit Afrique" suite. Finally, Cobham brings it all back home with the charming urban synthfunk of "Tinseltown." Percussion pedigree aside, Cobham makes his biorhythms march to the beat of a supremely intelligent jazz drummer.
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released June 15, 2015 | Groove

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Rock - Released September 25, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

Drummer and composer Billy Cobham is one of the great technical innovators that bridged jazz, fusion, and funk. Only fellow kit men Lenny White and Alphonse Mouzon were in his class, but neither was as fine a composer or arranger. In this attractively priced box, Cobham's first seven recordings as a leader are compiled with Inner Conflicts -- issued in 1978 after the drummer's first sojourn with Columbia -- to offer enduring proof of his mastery. His debut, 1973's self-produced Spectrum, is a jazz rock classic whose influence is immeasurable. Its production and accessible, driving melodies are framed inside intense, extremely technical compositions. The band included guitarists Tommy Bolin and John Tropea, keyboardist Jan Hammer, and bassist Lee Sklar, with guest spots from Ron Carter, Joe Farrell, and Ray Barretto. Cobham followed it with two ambitiously composed and arranged albums in 1974: Total Eclipse and Crosswinds. Though neither set achieved the crossover critical frenzy that greeted Spectrum, both have been reappraised in the 21st century as groundbreaking. Guitarist John Abercrombie and the Brecker Brothers played on both albums. Pianist Milcho Leviev played keyboards on Total Eclipse, while George Duke was at the helm on Crosswinds. Shabazz, recorded at the 1974 Montreux Jazz festival and released a year later, offered two new compositions as well as inspired readings of "Taurian Matador" and "Red Baron" from Spectrum. This hard-jamming keyboard-less group showcased Cobham in the company of Abercrombie, bassist Alex Blake, the Breckers, and trombonist Glenn Ferris. A Funky Thide of Sings, also from 1975, was a return to the studio. It offered a new, more intense vision of jazz funk rather than jazz rock, with guitarist John Scofield replacing Abercrombie. Cobham re-enlisted Leviev, the horns from Montreux, Blake, and Traffic's percussionist Rebop Kwaku Baah on guitar. The tunes were just as complex in terms of composition, but the grooves were monstrous. For 1976's Life & Times, Cobham pared his band to a quartet, keeping only Scofield, and hiring Doug Rauch and Dawilli Gonga on bass and keyboards, respectively. The compositions were tightly woven knots of fusion and funk with the seams jaggedly exposed to dramatic effect. A European tour with Duke, Scofield, and bassist Alphonso Johnson resulted in The Billy Cobham/George Duke Band: Live on Tour in Europe. The album has some terrific moments but is somewhat uneven. The drummer moved to Columbia for two dates before returning to Atlantic for the final record in this set. Inner Conflicts is a varied, futuristic jazz-funk record that actively embraces disco and Latin rhythms. Johnson and Scofield are core members; guests include the Breckers, Sheila and Pete Escovedo, and Julian Priester. Criticized at the time, it has acquitted itself as visionary thanks to DJs. Each album is newly remastered; some contain alternates, outtakes, and mono-and single mixes. They are individuallly encased in thick, replica cardboard sleeves. Also included is a 56-page booklet with an essay by Pete Riley. The price is affordable, the music essential. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released June 19, 2015 | Just Groove

Drummer Billy Cobham played some of the most exciting music of the 1970s. As a member of the Mahavishnu Orchestra and as a leader of his own bands, Cobham was at the forefront of the jazz fusion movement and was a prime mover during its glory days. He was still at it as of 2007, and proved more than capable of keeping up with both the new breed of fusion players and fellow veterans. Assisted by such stalwarts as Jan Hammer, Jeff Berlin, and Brian Auger, Cobham storms, crackles, and soars through a dazzling brace of dynamic, concise compositions on DRUM 'N' VOICE 2.
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released August 9, 2010 | Soul Trade Music Publishing Group

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Jazz - Released March 15, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

This is Billy Cobham's third solo recording under his own name and is a fine follow-up to Crosswinds. The mini-suite "Solarization" not only showcases the band's technical abilities, but also Cobham's strong compositional skills. It also features a schizophrenic piano solo ("Second Phase") from the underrated pianist Milcho Leviev, who sounds like a mutation of Cecil Taylor and Bill Evans. The funky "Moon Germs," on which John Abercrombie is pushed to inspiring new heights, became a Cobham classic. "The Moon Ain't Made of Green Cheese" is a beautiful flugelhorn solo by Randy Brecker backed by Cobham's debut on piano. The band stretches out on the lengthy "Sea of Tranquility," while "Last Frontier" is a gratuitous drum solo. This recording is highly recommended as Cobham still sounds inspired. ~ Robert Taylor