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Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Original Jazz Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions 8/10 de Volume - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
At the Village Vanguard features the innovative Bill Evans Trio in peak form during a 1961 engagement at New York's Village Vanguard, just days before bassist Scott LaFaro's tragic death in a car accident. At the time, the Vanguard date yielded two separate live albums, Sunday at the Village Vanguard and Waltz for Debby. This LP is a selection from the two previous releases which are also available as individual discs. The Trio had recorded only twice before: the studio sessions Portrait in Jazz in late December 1959, followed by Explorations more than a year after in February 1961. Six months later, these live recordings vividly captured a seminal moment in jazz only hinted at on their previous efforts. While Evans' extended solos on long tracks like "Solar" and "All of You" are lean and rhythmically incisive, the brilliant LaFaro is the real star here. His relentlessly upfront, guitar-like basslines and solos repeatedly challenge Evans and drummer Paul Motian to accompany him on a previously uncharted journey in pure improvisation. LaFaro's lyrical originals "Gloria's Step" and "Jade Visions" also revealed a fine jazz composer in the making. ~ Rovi Staff
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Universal Music Mexico

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released March 10, 2017 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The music recorded by Bill Evans on June 25, 1961, has long since acquired legendary status. Evans, a brilliant pianist whose unique voicings have influenced over a generation of jazz pianists who have followed him, weaves one masterpiece after another with bassist Scott LaFaro (a promising composer and phenomenal bassist) and the equally valuable drummer Paul Motian. The interplay between them is phenomenal throughout each of their five sets from the final day of a summer gig at the Village Vanguard. This beautifully remastered three-CD collection restores the previously omitted take of "Gloria's Step" (marred only by a brief power outage) and the humorous finale by Evans at the end of the night (first issued in the massive Complete Riverside Recordings box set). The songs are in their original recorded sequence, adding a bit of ambience and audience reaction between numbers. Sadly, it was the trio's final recording, as LaFaro died in a car crash ten days later. The selections from this three-CD box set have been reissued numerous times over the years, but this is the first time that all of them have been collected in one U.S. release. Orrin Keepnews, the original producer, updates the liner notes he previously contributed to earlier issues of this music with a thoughtful commentary. This is an essential purchase, whether you are a novice or seasoned jazz fan. [Released on vinyl in November 2014.] ~ Ken Dryden
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | Concord Records, Inc.

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Concord Records, Inc.

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The title refers to the Michel Legrand piece performed twice on the date, and to the fact that pianist Bill Evans was on the verge of switching labels from Fantasy to Warner Bros. For his final Fantasy album, Evans, bassist Eddie Gómez, and drummer Eliot Zigmund perform memorable renditions of such songs as Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance," Johnny Mandel's "Seascape," and Burt Bacharach's underrated "A House Is Not a Home." Fine post-bop music from an influential piano giant. ~ Scott Yanow
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Original Jazz Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Everybody Digs Bill Evans was a landmark recording for the young pianist and sported a unique album cover, featuring written-out endorsements from Miles Davis, George Shearing, Ahmad Jamal, and Cannonball Adderley. At a time approximate to when Evans was performing with the famous Kind of Blue band of Davis, Adderley, and John Coltrane, and actually departing the band, Evans continued to play the trio music he was ultimately best known for. With the unmatched pair of former Miles Davis drummer Philly Joe Jones and bassist Sam Jones (no relation), Evans was emerging not only as an ultra-sensitive player, but as an interpreter of standards second to none. The drummer is quite toned down to match the dynamics of the session, while the ever-reliable bassist lays back even more than usual, but at the expense of his soul. Of the covers, the solo "Lucky to Me" and the melancholy "What Is There to Say?" with the trio evoke the cool, smoldering emotionalism Evans was known for. He's even more starkly reserved on his solo version of "Young and Foolish." But Evans also knows how to play vigorous bop, tearing up the complicated "Oleo," and he modestly tackles the Gigi Gryce icon "Minority," though if you listen closely, the takes are slightly imprecise and a bit thin. Evans is hyperactive on a clattery calypso version of "Night and Day," with the melody almost an afterthought, powered by the precise drumming of Philly Joe Jones. Taking "Tenderly" in waltz time, Evans makes this familiar theme inimitably all his own. There are three more solos: two Asian-inspired interludes titled "Epilogue" and the demure and ultimately quiet "Peace Piece," a timeless, meditational, reverent, prayer-inspired composition that, in time, set a standard for chamber/classical European-tailored jazz. In an alternate/second-version bonus track, Evans superimposes this theme under the standard "Some Other Time," and it fits beautifully. Though not his very best effort overall, Evans garnered great attention, and rightfully so, from this important album of 1958. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Moon Beams was the first recording Bill Evans made after the death of his musical right arm, bassist Scott LaFaro. Indeed, in LaFaro, Evans found a counterpart rather than a sideman, and the music they made together over four albums showed it. Bassist Chuck Israels from Cecil Taylor and Bud Powell's bands took his place in the band with Evans and drummer Paul Motian and Evans recorded the only possible response to the loss of LaFaro -- an album of ballads. The irony on this recording is that, despite material that was so natural for Evans to play, particularly with his trademark impressionistic sound collage style, is that other than as a sideman almost ten years before, he has never been more assertive than on Moon Beams. It is as if, with the death of LaFaro, Evans' safety net was gone and he had to lead the trio alone. And he does first and foremost by abandoning the impressionism in favor of a more rhythmic and muscular approach to harmony. The set opens with an Evans original, "RE: Person I Knew," a modal study that looks back to his days he spent with Miles Davis. There is perhaps the signature jazz rendition of "Stairway to the Stars," with its loping yet halting melody line and solo that is heightened by Motian's gorgeous brush accents in the bridge section. Other selections are so well paced and sequenced the record feels like a dream, with the lovely stuttering arpeggios that fall in "If You Could See Me Now," and the cascading interplay between Evan's chords and Israel's punctuation in "It Might as Well Be Spring," a tune Evans played for the rest of his life. The set concludes with a waltz in "Very Early," that is played at that proper tempo with great taste and delicate elegance throughout, there is no temptation by the rhythm section to charge it up or to elongate the harmonic architecture by means of juggling intervals. Moon Beams was a startling return to the recording sphere and a major advancement in his development as a leader. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1978 | Concord Records, Inc.

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Thirteen years after his legendary Village Vanguard recordings, Bill Evans recorded Since We Met at the famous New York establishment again. Using his trio of the era (which includes bassist Eddie Gómez and drummer Marty Morell), Evans explores both familiar ("Time Remembered," "Turn Out the Stars" and "But Beautiful") and new (Joe Zawinul's "Midnight Mood," "See-Saw" and "Sareen Jurer") material. This CD reissue gives listeners a good example of Bill Evans' early-'70s trio as it typically sounded in clubs. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Aside from a series of studio sessions a decade earlier for Verve, this LP represents the only other meeting featuring Stan Getz with pianist Bill Evans. Originally issued by the notorious bootleg label Jazzdoor with six selections from a Laren, Holland concert in 1974, Milestone acquired the masters for a legitimate release and added four bonus tunes from a concert in Antwerp, Belgium a week later. Getz meshes almost perfectly with Evans' trio (with bassist Eddie Gómez and drummer Marty Morell), with only one sore spot: Getz ignored the pianist's request not to play the under-rehearsed "Stan's Blues," which provoked Evans into quickly dropping out and signaling his sidemen to avoid solos of their own. But the remaining tracks are all invigorating, particularly Evans' brisk "Funkallero" and the lush take of Jimmy Rowles' ballad "The Peacocks." It seems a shame that there were not additional opportunities for Getz and Evans to work together on other occasions, but it is possible that their strong personalities would have clashed. Highly recommended! ~ Ken Dryden
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1986 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
At the Village Vanguard features the innovative Bill Evans Trio in peak form during a 1961 engagement at New York's Village Vanguard, just days before bassist Scott LaFaro's tragic death in a car accident. At the time, the Vanguard date yielded two separate live albums, Sunday at the Village Vanguard and Waltz for Debby. This LP is a selection from the two previous releases which are also available as individual discs. The Trio had recorded only twice before: the studio sessions Portrait in Jazz in late December 1959, followed by Explorations more than a year after in February 1961. Six months later, these live recordings vividly captured a seminal moment in jazz only hinted at on their previous efforts. While Evans' extended solos on long tracks like "Solar" and "All of You" are lean and rhythmically incisive, the brilliant LaFaro is the real star here. His relentlessly upfront, guitar-like basslines and solos repeatedly challenge Evans and drummer Paul Motian to accompany him on a previously uncharted journey in pure improvisation. LaFaro's lyrical originals "Gloria's Step" and "Jade Visions" also revealed a fine jazz composer in the making. ~ Rovi Staff
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Universal Music Mexico

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Recorded in May and June of 1962, at the same time as the Moonbeams sessions, How My Heart Sings shows a different side of the Bill Evans Trio than that all-ballads album. Here, the eight selections have a much more mid- and even up-tempo flair. Israel appears more comfortable in these settings to be sure, as he is the kind of bassist that relegates himself deeply into the rhythm section, sublimating himself to the pianist. In Evans' own words, the band's desire was to "provide a more singing sound" in this material. The set begins with a lyrical waltz in the title track. Evans himself comments in the liner notes that it "contains a delightful 4/4 interlude framed by a delightful 3/4 lyric line." Nowhere does he discuss his solo that literally ripples in delicate waves off the middle register, and Motian's stick work shimmies up the rhythm and allows it to truly dance and sing. There are a number of standards here, including "Summertime," which sounds so different with its mid-tempo opening and Israel's flaunting bass vamp in front of the piano. When Evans gets to the melody he is following the swinging skip of Motian's drums, and he digs deep into inverting the melody line with a slew of arpeggios and short, choppy phrases. On Cole Porter's "Everything I Love," Evans takes the snap in the tune and breaks it, committing it to a driving swing and vaunting lyrical gem that has three seemingly unresolvable harmonic problems in the center that turn out to be a Moebius strip in Evan's chromatic language. This is a tough recording; it flies in the face of the conventions Evans himself has set, and yet retrains the deep, nearly profound lyricism that was the pianist's trademark. [Some reissues add an alternate take of "In Your Own Sweet Way."] ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released March 10, 2017 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

Hi-Res Booklet