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Alternative & Indie - Released November 22, 2019 | New West Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2017 | GoldVE

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Pop - Released May 20, 1997 | Ten Fingers

17-year-old Australian Ben Lee has been recording and touring since the tender age of thirteen. Following his previous effort, Grandpa Would, these fourteen cuts show a more mature, acoustic-based artist with plenty of room left to grow. From the great "Ketchum" to the innocently catchy a cappella "A Month Today," Ben Lee truly does give us Something to Remember Me By. ~ James Chrispell
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Pop - Released June 22, 1995 | Ten Fingers

Australian wunderkind of the '90s Ben Lee was only in his early teens when he recorded this debut LP, but his songwriting skills were already evidence of an ability beyond his years. Stripped to the barest of essentials, and often resorting simply to Lee and his guitar, the 18 tracks on the record are full of pure gooey pop and trademark simple but engaging lyrics. With help from both Liz Phair and Rebecca Gates, as well as a high-profile release from Grand Royal, Lee's first effort was backed by plenty of folks who believed in his skills, and it's doubtful that any were disappointed with the result. With simple approaches and plenty of songs about girls, the singer's tales of childish infatuation and normal fears are certainly believable, and the inclusion of more silly upbeat numbers like "Ductile" and "My Guitar" paints a portrait of Lee as a normal teen with a surprising penchant for writing great songs. This record reeks of the innocence that disappeared from his later albums, and for that alone it is wildly endearing. Grandpa Would is a distant sound compared to Noise Addict, Lee's other group from the time this was recorded, but its far from daunting "boy and his guitar" aspect is easy to fall in love with, and it gives some good justification for his decision to continue on with a solo career. ~ Peter J. D'Angelo
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Pop - Released May 29, 2015 | Warner Records

Two decades deep into his recording career, Ben Lee is comfortable in his skin -- comfortable enough to indulge in a bit of unrepentant positivity on Love Is the Great Rebellion, his tenth solo album. Thanks in part to Brad Wood's gleaming production -- he previously helmed Lee's 2009 album The Rebirth of Venus -- Love Is the Great Rebellion is big, bright, and cheerful, but much of its relentless optimism is due to none other than the singer/songwriter himself, who is eager to spread good vibes wherever his songs are sung. Although he can dip into sheer hippie-dippiness -- "Happiness" is a worthy sequel to the worst of Donovan, so it's fitting Lee's father-in-law deigns to make a cameo here, and the children's choir of "I'm Changing My Mind" wasn't the best of ideas -- generally the polished punch of Wood's work pushes Love Is the Great Rebellion into sunny positive pop, the kind of album that can double as motivation or pleasing background music for the office. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2019 | New West Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 16, 1998 | Ten Fingers

Apparently Ben Lee's been getting a good deal of the proper encouragement and studio connections needed to get away with such an "It's okay to be inoffensive" record. Because Breathing Tornados is inoffensive, and it is okay. Many listeners will bristle at 12 songs that essentially intend to instruct you how to live a wise and healthy life, sung by a guy scarcely older than your teenage brother with that hip nasal inflection going around among young solo acoustic acts these days. Although often compared to Beck, P.J. Olsson and Ben Folds, Lee is not a great innovator, although "Nothing Much Happens" is something of a sparkly centerpiece among relatively unremarkable two-chord singalongs like "Cigarettes Will Kill You" and the catchy "Birthday Song." An awful lot of precovered angsty territory is sloshed over again in "Burn to Shine" and "Ship My Body Home," reminding us that youth is the question and the answer, the problem and the solution ... to that elusive something that gets referred to on this record a lot, yet never actually named. As on the sleepy anthem "Tornados," Lee is attempting to figure it out, and hopefully he'll reign disappointed enough in his quest to keep searching, thus keep making records. ~ Becky Byrkit
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Pop - Released April 28, 2009 | New West Records

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Pop - Released May 20, 2016 | New West Records

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Pop - Released September 18, 2007 | New West Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 5, 2003 | FADER Label

When Grand Royal folded after the release of Ben Lee's third album, he was thrown into artistic limbo in the U.S., incapable of building on the momentum from his sorta successful third album, Breathing Tornados. Despite a few low-key tours in 2001 -- when he debuted most of the material from what would become his fourth album -- he dropped off the radar, relegated to the status of "Claire Danes' boyfriend" and little else. But when Hey You, Yes You, his fourth record, finally did appear at the tail end of 2002 as an Australian import, it showed that Lee didn't stop growing even though he couldn't release any records. Hey You, Yes You takes the sonic experimentation that Lee sketched out on the polished, shiny Breathing Tornados and expands it into trippier, more beat-heavy territory, due largely to producer Dan the Automator. The two are a perfect match, since Dan the Automator creates an adventurous sonic landscape for Lee's pleasant but typical songs, making the record sound for all the world like a much more tuneful version of the Gorillaz record. If Lee hadn't started down this path with Tornados, Hey You, Yes You might've sounded forced, but instead it sounds perfectly natural; Lee wants to write simple, basic, guitar-oriented pop songs, but he wants enough musical bric-a-brac around to make things colorful and interesting. Like his previous efforts, Hey You, Yes You is delightfully unpretentious and incessantly catchy, whether it's on typical Lee power poppers like "Running With Scissors" or gorgeous power ballads (the Jason Schwartzman co-penned "Chills"), or when he's playing with his newfound grooviness, such as on the spacy "Dirty Mind" or the intense "Something Borrowed, Something Blue." ~ Jason Damas
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Pop - Released May 20, 2016 | New West Records

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House - Released October 11, 2019 | Mood Of The Era

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 1, 2019 | New West Records

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Pop - Released February 22, 2005 | New West Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2019 | New West Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 11, 2019 | New West Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 11, 2011 | Dangerbird Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 26, 2005 | Dim Mak Records

House - Released May 21, 2018 | Boutade Musique

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