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Pop - Released September 1, 2000 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released September 23, 2003 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released July 28, 1992 | Sire - Warner Records

Gordon picks up where the Barenaked Ladies' famous demo "The Yellow Tape" left off and moves them into majors. Their first for Reprise, this witty songbook finds the Canadian five-piece to be a clever group -- charming, but not childish, yet the Barenaked Ladies are pretty close to overstepping the boundaries of silliness. The thing that keeps them in line is their sharp harmonies. Shared vocals between guitarist Ed Robertson and Steven Page are refreshing and upbeat, especially on reworked versions of "Brian Wilson," "Be My Yoko Ono," and the eternal favorite "If I Had a $1000000 Dollars." "Hello City" and "Box Set" are slick narratives, making for album standouts with its jazz-cool blend. Other shiny moments, such as "Enid" and "Grade 9," are humorous in reflecting upon adolescence, while "Wrap Your Arms Around Me" showcases the Barenaked Ladies' more romantic side. Through all the jokes, these guys are a bunch of suckers for love and such sensitivity is a great match for their quirky musical persona. Gordon is a great introduction to the Barenaked Ladies' sweet comic relief and it's sure to be a college rock mainstay. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 7, 1998 | Rhino - Warner Records

By trying to mask their smart-ass humor in a big pop production, the Barenaked Ladies attempt to set themselves up for the big crossover that they nearly achieved with such past singles as "Be My Yoko Ono" and "Brian Wilson." Nothing on Stunt, the group's fourth studio album, is so clearly jokey (although "Alcohol" comes close), but they still rely on clever satire. That may irritate some listeners who would otherwise be won over by the group's increased musical skill. Never before has the band been able to pull off so many different styles, from jangly pop and alt-country to loungy bossa nova, so well. Musically, it could convince the doubters who have written off Barenaked Ladies as novelty pranksters, but the lyrics still will stand in the way of trad-rockers predisposed to this style of music. Of course, listeners who are a little less uptight will find Stunt to be a fine collegiate party record and one of the best albums the Barenaked Ladies have released. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Ambient/New Age - Released November 24, 2014 | Concord Vanguard

It's probably safe to say that fans of Barenaked Ladies have never found a holiday album to suit their tastes until now, when the notoriously quirky Canadian quintet released Barenaked for the Holidays. This will likely satisfy that portion of their audience (however large or small it is) that has wanted a holiday album delivered with that patented blend of jokiness and sentiment that's been the group's stock-in-trade. That may give the inaccurate impression that this album has been tossed off, which is hardly the case. The arrangements are nimble and largely clever, even when the group goes for an easy joke, as on the Casio-driven bossa nova instrumental revamp of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer." Admirably, the group doesn't rely solely on traditional carols, they contribute six originals to the mix; some, like "Green Christmas," are quite good, while others, like "Elf's Lament," are too jokey, but that may not bother the diehards all that much. Even more admirably, this is one of the few holiday albums that is pretty evenly divided between Christmas and Hanukkah songs, which isn't just nicely PC, but gives the album both musical and topical variety, making it a little more interesting and distinctive than the average holiday record. Still, whether you like the album or not boils down to this: do you find it funny when a slow, sincere version of "Jingle Bells" breaks into a jocular parody with the classic "Jingle bells/Batman smells/Robin laid an egg" lyric halfway through the song, and if you do, do you like the sentimental beginning as much as the silly conclusion? If so, Barenaked for the Holidays is for you. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 17, 2017 | Concord Vanguard

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Rock - Released May 20, 2016 | Concord Vanguard

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Pop - Released September 23, 2011 | Rhino - Warner Records

The 2011 Barenaked Ladies compilation Hits from Yesterday & the Day Before compiles most of the hits and best-known cuts from the band's catalog. Beginning with the band's 1992 full-length debut, Gordon, and continuing all the way through to the group's 2011 post-Steven Page release, All in Good Time, Hits features such popular cuts as "If I Had $1,000,000," "Brian Wilson," "Too Little Too Late," "Falling for the First Time," "One Week," "Easy," and more. Certainly, die-hard fans will miss such lesser-known tracks as "Be My Yoko Ono" and "Jane." In that sense, 2001's fan-voted anthology Disc One: All Their Greatest Hits (1991-2001) did a better job of including everything from a longtime fan perspective. Nonetheless, Hits from Yesterday & the Day Before still works as a nice single-disc summation of the Canadian rock band's career. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 13, 2001 | Reprise

Canada's beloved funny guys the Barenaked Ladies have proved to be more than just a novelty act. Four albums into their wavering career, Stunt was golden for American fans and BNL found themselves chiefing the mainstream scene during the late '90s. So to issue a greatest-hits collection might be appropriate for those fans who caught on late, but also a sweet deal for those loyalists who were following the band since the early days of the lost Yellow Tape. Disc One: All Their Greatest Hits (1991-2001) is a heavy dose of Barenaked Ladies favorites spooled together in an inoperative mix. It's not distracting, though, for the select batch basically sounds like a mix tape. What's even more charming is how BNL allowed fans to vote for their favorite songs online in order to make up the song listing. Radio staples like "One Week" and "Pinch Me" are woven in between cult classics like "Be My Yoko Ono," "Enid," and "The Old Apartment." Two prime cuts from the multi-platinum Rock Spectacle -- "What a Good Boy" and "Brian Wilson" -- are also included, but the rare acoustic beauty of Bruce Cockburn's "Lovers in a Dangerous Time" is a definite standout. Two new songs complete this lush and celebratory album. The spunky new wave-like "It's Only Me (The Wizard of Magicland)" boasts typical BNL humor and grandeur; however, "Thanks That Was Fun" gives something more. It's an emotional track, and Ed Robinson's dark vocals are his finest yet. Disc One: All Their Greatest Hits (1991-2001) does indeed close a chapter in the ever-changing storybook of the Barenaked Ladies. They're rock stars, but they were friends first -- even before they had a million dollars. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 19, 1996 | Reprise

As if to acknowledge that Barenaked Ladies' third album, 1996's Born on a Pirate Ship, was a blunder that wouldn't do much to advance the Canadian group's U.S. image, Reprise Records quickly followed it up with the live set Rock Spectacle. This was a wise move, as years of nearly nonstop touring had helped the group transform from a jokey folk-rock group into a talented pop group with both musical chops and stage presence to burn. Though the album doesn't include much of what makes Barenaked Ladies such a unique live act, singer-guitarists Steven Page and Ed Robertson are masters of improvisational humor, and a good chunk of any Barenaked Ladies show is given to often hilarious extemporaneous bits -- it certainly makes the point that the group is an underrated source of pure pop delights. This album's superior live take of 1992's "Brian Wilson" became Barenaked Ladies' first U.S. radio hit, setting the stage for the across-the-board success of 1998's excellent Stunt. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 12, 1994 | Reprise

Barenaked Ladies are a little less interested in the quirky and comic on their second album, perhaps recognizing that They Might Be Giants have that niche covered. Instead, though, they are showing their sensitive folk-pop roots, which makes them winning, if a little wet. (XTC, anyone?) But one thing they aren't is "alternative," a matter dealt with in the chorus of the song "Alternative Girlfriend," when they sing, "There's nothing left that won't cross over." Well put, and present company included. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 15, 1996 | Reprise

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Rock - Released May 30, 2019 | Vanguard Records

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Rock - Released June 2, 2015 | Concord Vanguard

Six years and three albums into Barenaked Ladies' post-Steven Page world, the Canadian stalwarts continue to craft thoughtful, melodic pop/rock. Of course, it's somewhat unfair to even reference Page (who left the band in 2009), but despite the high quality of much of the band's subsequent material, one often misses the juxtaposition of lead singer/songwriter Ed Robertson's sweet-voiced sincerity with Page's broad, resonant yawp. That said, with a title inspired by Robertson's avowed love of pinball, a fanatical hobby he picked after his 2008 plane crash, Barenaked Ladies' 2015 effort, Silverball, certainly feels like a solid return to form. In many ways, Silverball is fairly similar to the two previous BNL albums (2010's All in Good Time and 2013's Grinning Streak), featuring intimate, reflective, melodic songs, tinged with both a wry humor and bittersweet maturity. Of course, some of this maturity stems from keyboardist Kevin Hearn's leukemia, a disease he successfully battled in the late '90s, and which returned during the recording of Silverball. It's a dramatic tension that imbues the album’s closing ballad "Tired of Fighting with You," with a doubly poignant energy. But despite these themes, Silverball is anything but labored and sad. Cuts like the ebullient "Passcode" and sparkling "Piece of Cake" are uplifting and melodic, bringing to mind the '70s AM pop of bands like ELO and the Beach Boys. Similarly, the laid-back "Hold My Hand" and the harmony-laden "Say What You Want" are classic, heartfelt BNL songs that stick in your ears long after they've ended. Whether it's the loss of a bandmate, or the return of a disease, Robertson and BNL often utilize the back-and-forth imagery of pinball to illuminate their deeper lyrical messages. Additionally, on the leadoff "Get Back Up," Robertson turns to boxing in his characteristic tongue-in-cheek way to explore the notion of resilience in the face of defeat. He sings, "Not the second coming of Muhammad Ali, but can I get a 'whoop!' for the boxing imagery?" Ultimately, after a justified period of rethinking the band's approach to pop, Barenaked Ladies have once again found their musical footing with Silverball, and they deserve every "whoop!" they can get. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Concord Vanguard

The Barenaked Ladies' 11th studio album, 2013's Grinning Streak, finds the band sticking with the polished, mature sound they delved into on 2010's All in Good Time. The second album the band has released since splitting with lead singer/songwriter Steven Page in 2009, Grinning Streak is also the band's first for Vanguard. Once again, longtime singer/songwriter Ed Robertson takes most of the spotlight here, with keyboardist Kevin Hearn getting one self-penned turn at the mike. Clearly, with Page having been such a huge part of the band’s sound, Barenaked Ladies had a tough time rethinking their identity. Smartly, with All in Good Time, rather than trying to replace Page, the band moved in a more subdued, mature direction, making the most of Robertson's longstanding knack for writing particularly playful, but nonetheless heartfelt alt-rock anthems about love, loss, and the intimate little details that make up our lives. The band sticks to this approach on Grinning Streak with thoughtfully crafted arrangements that mix melodic pop with liberal electronic flourishes. In fact, the album has a bit of an ironic title, as the songs generally feature a tone of poignant reflection. Which isn't to say that the band has lost its sense of humor. On the contrary, it’s still there, but with more of a melancholy edge than when the band was an MTV favorite in the late '90s and early 2000s. To these ends, we get a handful of immediately hummable folk-pop tunes including "Boomerang" and the jaunty, lite-rap, feel-good anthem "Odds Are." While these songs certainly carry a bit more emotional weight than much of BNL's past hits, they also reveal a hopefulness. On "Odds Are," Robertson sings, "Sure, things can go wrong/ But I’ll take my chances/Odds are long, so why not play." Ultimately, while the toothy smiles might be wiped off the faces of Robertson and the rest of the Barenaked Ladies' faces, Grinning Streak reveals that their hearts remains firmly on their sleeves. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Caroline Records

Continuing in the mature, reflective vein of 2003's Everything to Everyone, the Barenaked Ladies' seventh studio album Barenaked Ladies Are Me features more of the band's trademark wit and melodic folk-rock. Never straying too far afield from the formula they've been using ever since their breakthrough 1998 album Stunt, Barenaked Ladies are true torchbearers for the post-R.E.M., post-Smiths sound that shares much in common with such bands as Beautiful South, They Might Be Giants and even Sloan. Once again, lead vocal duties are largely split between Steven Page and Ed Robertson although both pianist/guitarist Kevin Hearn and bassist Jim Creeggan take the lead here on their original tunes "Vanishing" and "Peterborogh and the Kawarthas," respectively. Interestingly, these tracks, along with Hearn's "Sound Of Your Voice", are some of the best on the album with both musicians displaying a true knack for writing heartfelt, literate and tuneful songs about leaving those you love, whether they are your wife or young son. Elsewhere, the band's gift for mixing the humorous and the poignant is evident on such eminently catchy tracks as "Bank Job," "Bull in a China Shop'," and "Rule the World with Love." For a band 16 years into its career, it's great to hear an album so full of sparkling, positive-minded songcraft and thoughtful revelations. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 6, 2008 | Concord Vanguard

The first full-length children's album by Canadian pop stalwarts Barenaked Ladies, Snacktime! reveals what is both enchanting and a little bit irritating about the often witty, sometimes silly, and usually melodically catchy pop band. Musically, all the Barenaked touchstones are here: '70s singer/songwriter, AM pop, indie rock, folk, alt-rock, and even some quirky electronic-based romps. In that sense, the album plays like most of the band's catalog, with each bandmember adding a composition to the mix. The difference here is in the lyrical content, which is obviously aimed at and inspired by kids. But rather than simply target kids of today, Barenaked Ladies have crafted a children's pop album inspired by their own '70s/'80s childhoods. Accordingly, listeners gets tracks like "The Ninjas," a popular and kitschy topic among Gen-Xers (due largely to the abundance of '80s ninja movies), turned here into a kind of fairy tale about sneaky and deadly nighttime visitors. Similarly, the loopy wordplay song "Raisins" finds vocalist Ed Robertson wondering whether "the Parthenon's in Greece/Or was it in Grease 2?" But rather than merely calling out retro-pop culture themes, songs like the giddy "Eraser" and the thoughtful "Canadian Snacktime Trilogy" bring to mind a time when kids were more likely to spend afternoons with crayons and Elmer's Glue than with computers and the Internet. It's also reminiscent of a time when bubblegum pop was the sound of kids' music, and tracks like "Vegetable Town," "'Drawing," and "Humungous Tree" bring to mind -- at least lyrically if not specifically musically -- the fantastical, bittersweet, pastry-laden landscapes of the Banana Splits and the Wombles. Admittedly, for all the pleasant and hummable tracks on Snacktime! there are conversely a few ear-grating numbers like the hyperactive rawk of "Allergies" and the quirky but static reggae of "What a Wild Tune," which may elicit enthusiasm from the PB&J set while acting as a kind of musical torture technique on parents. That said, cuts like the sunny and melodic "'Pollywog in a Bog," the airy and euphoric "Louis Loon," and the cinematic album closer "Here Come the Geese" bring to mind well-earned comparisons to Todd Rundgren, XTC, and the Flaming Lips, and are easily some of the best pop tracks, let alone children's songs, Barenaked Ladies have ever recorded. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 5, 2011 | BNL Entertainment

The first full-length children's album by Canadian pop stalwarts Barenaked Ladies, Snacktime! reveals what is both enchanting and a little bit irritating about the often witty, sometimes silly, and usually melodically catchy pop band. Musically, all the Barenaked touchstones are here: '70s singer/songwriter, AM pop, indie rock, folk, alt-rock, and even some quirky electronic-based romps. In that sense, the album plays like most of the band's catalog, with each bandmember adding a composition to the mix. The difference here is in the lyrical content, which is obviously aimed at and inspired by kids. But rather than simply target kids of today, Barenaked Ladies have crafted a children's pop album inspired by their own '70s/'80s childhoods. Accordingly, listeners gets tracks like "The Ninjas," a popular and kitschy topic among Gen-Xers (due largely to the abundance of '80s ninja movies), turned here into a kind of fairy tale about sneaky and deadly nighttime visitors. Similarly, the loopy wordplay song "Raisins" finds vocalist Ed Robertson wondering whether "the Parthenon's in Greece/Or was it in Grease 2?" But rather than merely calling out retro-pop culture themes, songs like the giddy "Eraser" and the thoughtful "Canadian Snacktime Trilogy" bring to mind a time when kids were more likely to spend afternoons with crayons and Elmer's Glue than with computers and the Internet. It's also reminiscent of a time when bubblegum pop was the sound of kids' music, and tracks like "Vegetable Town," "'Drawing," and "Humungous Tree" bring to mind -- at least lyrically if not specifically musically -- the fantastical, bittersweet, pastry-laden landscapes of the Banana Splits and the Wombles. Admittedly, for all the pleasant and hummable tracks on Snacktime! there are conversely a few ear-grating numbers like the hyperactive rawk of "Allergies" and the quirky but static reggae of "What a Wild Tune," which may elicit enthusiasm from the PB&J set while acting as a kind of musical torture technique on parents. That said, cuts like the sunny and melodic "'Pollywog in a Bog," the airy and euphoric "Louis Loon," and the cinematic album closer "Here Come the Geese" bring to mind well-earned comparisons to Todd Rundgren, XTC, and the Flaming Lips, and are easily some of the best pop tracks, let alone children's songs, Barenaked Ladies have ever recorded. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 1, 2000 | Reprise

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Rock - Released October 8, 2010 | BNL Entertainment

While 2006's Barenaked Ladies Are Me was an enjoyably melodic and heartfelt album, Barenaked Ladies' 2007 companion album Barenaked Ladies Are Men bests its predecessor by throwing in just a bit more wit, sparkle, and pop. Where Are Me was low-key and mature, Are Men is a just a bit more energized and in some ways features a few more memorable hooks. Songs like "Something You'll Never Find," "Angry People," and "Down to Earth" are catchy, playful Beatles-meet-Crowded House-meet-the Cars kind of pop and should definitely appeal to longtime fans of the band. However, there are still some mature, laid-back moments including the Burt Bacharach-inflected ballad "Beautiful" and the singer/songwriterly "Half a Heart" which, while still retaining a sense of irony and wit, reveal just how skillful lead singers Steven Page and Ed Robertson have become at writing devastatingly poignant songs. Though fans of the band may appreciate the group's prolific output, the need to release two full studio albums would seem fairly dubious were it not for the generally high quality of the tracks on the two albums. In that light, though they are separate releases, taken together Barenaked Ladies Are Me and Barenaked Ladies Are Men should not only stand as a creative high point for the Canadian rockers, but a truly superb would-be double-album. © Matt Collar /TiVo