Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$29.49
CD$25.49

Hard Rock - Released January 10, 2020 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
CD$44.99

Hard Rock - Released July 19, 2019 | Rhino Atlantic

HI-RES$24.99
CD$21.99

Hard Rock - Released April 7, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released April 6, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
HI-RES$17.99
CD$15.49

Hard Rock - Released October 2, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
Prior to the 2015 collection Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy: The Very Best of Bad Company, there were only two Bad Company compilations in release: the lean 1985 set 10 from 6, arriving a full six years after their last hit album, and 1999's The Original Bad Company Anthology, a 33-track double-disc set that dug deep into the group's golden years of 1974-1982. Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy occupies a much-needed middle ground, providing 19 songs on a generous single disc. This, like The Original Bad Company Anthology, focuses solely on the six albums Bad Company cut for Swan Song, which means there's nothing from their late-'80s/early-'90s run on Atco, even though "No Smoke Without a Fire," "Holy Water," "If You Needed Somebody," and "How About That" are also owned by WEA and could easily have been included. So, this is all a matter of aesthetics: a decision to highlight the band's big, brawny arena rockers, the best of which ("Can't Get Enough," "Bad Company," "Ready for Love," "Feel Like Makin' Love," "Shooting Star," "Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy") are quintessential classic rock staples. The remaining 13 songs here -- including lesser-known singles "Movin' On," "Good Lovin' Gone Bad," "Honey Child," and "Gone, Gone, Gone," along with a representative portion of album cuts -- show how Bad Company offered more than those well-known songs, how they moved with a steady macho assurance that stripped British blues-rock down to the loud, churning basics. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
HI-RES$24.99
CD$21.99

Hard Rock - Released April 19, 2011 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Pop - Released May 26, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released April 19, 2011 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released June 1, 1985 | Rhino Atlantic

10 From 6 means ten songs from six albums -- namely, Bad Company's first six records, all of which were big hits on album-oriented rock radio. This brief yet very effective collection gathers all of the group's best-known songs ("Can't Get Enough," "Feel Like Makin' Love," "Shooting Star," "Bad Company," "Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy," "Ready for Love") in one place. Although most album-oriented hard rock acts are better heard on the original albums, Bad Company's records tended to be more uneven than those of their peers, making 10 From 6 a valuable collection for the group's casual fans, who will want to bypass the cluttered studio albums and just get the cream of the crop. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Pop - Released May 26, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Rock - Released May 20, 2008 | Rhino Atlantic

By the time Bad Company released Desolation Angels, it was evident that even Rodgers and Ralphs were getting tired of their '70s-styled, conveyor-belt brand of rock & roll, so they decided to add keyboards and some minor string work to the bulk of the tracks. Although this change of musical scenery was a slight breath of fresh air, it wasn't enough to give Desolation Angels the much added depth or distinction that was intended, and only the vocal passion of "Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy" really comes out on top, eventually becoming a gold single. The good news is that Desolation Angels is a noticeable improvement from 1977's Burnin' Sky, with Bad Company's sound taking on a smoother, more polished feel than its predecessor. "Gone, Gone, Gone," "Lonely for Your Love," and "She Brings Me Love" work best in Rodgers' favor, and fans did prove their loyalty, pushing the album to the number ten mark in the U.K. and to number three in the U.S. The campaign toward a new sound does cause a few of the cuts ("Crazy Circles," "Evil Wind") to appear a bit forced and overly glitzy (especially the use of electronic drums), and the album spawns a smattering of a few attractive moments rather than evolving as a complete, constructive listen. Things didn't get much better for Bad Company, and it was after the release of 1982's Rough Diamonds, a much weaker and unattached effort, that Rodgers decided to call it quits. ~ Mike DeGagne
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released April 6, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Hard Rock - Released April 29, 2016 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
CD$18.99

Hard Rock - Released May 26, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released June 15, 2009 | Rhino Atlantic

The swan song on Swan Song. Bad Company had done well for themselves by laying off for two years after the disappointing Burnin' Sky (1977), then coming back with Desolation Angels (1979) and its hit single, "Rock 'N' Roll Fantasy." Instead of capitalizing on this resurgence, they disappeared for another three years before trying it again with Rough Diamonds. Remember, it was not yet common in the music business for major groups to stay away from the marketplace that long. In Bad Company's case, the results were disastrous: the album didn't even make the Top 25 in the U.S. or go gold, much less platinum. And those, of course, were the stakes; if a band like this can't fill stadiums, they might as well stay home on their estates. The real problem was that the band had nothing to say. The music was softer and less distinctive than on their earlier records, and it seemed that the team was not getting along. Why else would the bass player, not previously known as a songwriter, get two sole songwriting credits (both wretched songs -- one about watching TV, the other about being in a rock 'n' roll band, naturally), and why else would the singer be allotted three carefully credited lead guitar spots (except that he wanted them and that the real lead guitarist didn't want anyone to think they were his work)? In any case, Bad Company broke up after this album, with Paul Rodgers going solo and then hooking up with Jimmy Page in The Firm, and Ralphs and drummer Simon Kirke waiting four years and then disingenuously launching a new band under The Bad Company name. Don't be fooled. This is the end, right here. ~ William Ruhlmann
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released November 16, 2010 | Rhino Atlantic

Bad Company's last platinum album, Holy Water is a formulaic yet reasonably engaging collection of AOR hard rock. Although the only original members on Holy Water are guitarist Mick Ralphs and drummer Simon Kirke, the band does a fair job of approximating the sound of classic Bad Company while adding enough elements of '80s pop-metal to make the record appealing to teenagers who grew up on power ballads. And the band does turn in a first-rate power ballad with "If You Needed Somebody," which rose all the way to number 16 on the singles chart. Surprisingly, that was one of three hits from the album -- "Holy Water" and "Walk Through Fire" also received a fair amount of airplay. What that success signals is not a creative rebirth for Bad Company, but that the group knew how to follow a formula very well. Holy Water hasn't aged as well as their original hit albums -- instead of the clean, ballsy attack of Bad Company and Straight Shooter, it's awash in echo and synths -- but it is a finely crafted, big-budget record of the late '80s and early '90s. It's just as indicative of its era as Bad Company is. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 12, 2018 | BMG

CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released November 16, 2010 | Rhino Atlantic

Down to a trio of Mick Ralphs, Simon Kirke, and Brian Howe, the band that called itself Bad Company relies on studio musicians to fill out the sound and Howe and producer Terry Thomas to write most of the material on this anonymous-sounding fourth album by the second edition of the group. Even those willing to tolerate Ralphs/Kirke/Howe calling themselves "Bad Company" didn't show much interest, so the band fell off from the platinum showing of 1990's Holy Water to much more modest sales this time around, despite the chart singles "How About That" (number 38) and "This Could Be the One" (number 87). ~ William Ruhlmann
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released November 16, 2010 | Rhino Atlantic

Bad Company launched a major comeback in 1988 with Dangerous Age. It wasn't the original lineup, lacking Paul Rodgers, but Mick Ralphs was still on board, and he could still turn out some pretty solid numbers, like the title track and "One Night." The album also suffers from a slick, late-'80s AOR production, but compared to some of the albums that came later, Dangerous Age was satisfying. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released April 19, 2011 | Rhino Atlantic