Similar artists

Albums

$17.49
$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released September 22, 2017 | Masterworks

Hi-Res Booklet
His escapades towards soul, pop and folk music are not completely new. Except that with 1970, Avishai Cohen jumps feet first with a whole album into… soul, pop and folk music! The Israeli bass player admittedly never forgets the jazz soul in his music; he simply pays homage here to sounds, textures and universes that he grew up with. A mostly sung journey (both in English and in Hebrew) that he undertakes with numerous guests such as Itamar Doari on percussion, Yael Shapira on cello, Elyasaf Bishari on oud, Tal Kohavi on drums, Yonatan Daskal on keyboards and Karen Malka at the microphone. As Avishai Cohen says it himself: “it’s not a jazz record. I don’t know what it is, but I’ve always had a connection to pop. I like pop as much as I like Bach and Charlie Parker. Singing has become very serious in my life over time. I’ve been asked by many people, when is the vocal album gonna come? Well, this is it, right here.” © CM/Qobuz
$12.99

Jazz - Released March 16, 2009 | Parlophone France

More than once, someone has incorrectly assumed that bassist Avishai Cohen and trumpeter Avishai Cohen are the same person. It is easy to understand why one could make that mistake; in addition to having the same name, both of them are jazz musicians who grew up in Israel and moved to New York City in the '90s (the bassist ended up moving back to Israel). But they're definitely two different people, and the Avishai Cohen on Aurora is the bassist, not the trumpeter. Aurora finds this Avishai Cohen not only playing acoustic and electric bass, but also playing acoustic piano and electric keyboards and singing. In fact, he does a great deal of singing on this 2008 recording -- which will come as a surprise to those who think of Cohen as strictly an instrumentalist. Aurora is by no means an easy album to categorize; at the risk of oversimplifying things, one possible description could be "world jazz meets post-bop meets adult alternative." Jazz is a prominent ingredient on Aurora, but so are pop/rock and world music -- and Cohen gets a lot of inspiration from Middle Eastern, North African, and Spanish music. He sings in four different languages -- Hebrew, English, Ladino (the language of Spain's Sephardic Jews), and Spanish -- on an album that is dominated by original material but also contains some traditional Jewish songs. But as unpredictable as this 53-minute CD is, Aurora has a certain continuity. Cohen sounds like he knows exactly what he's doing, and he has sympathetic support that includes Amos Hoffman on oud (a traditional Middle Eastern lute) and Karen Malka on vocals (although Cohen is the main vocalist). This album obviously wasn't designed with jazz purists in mind, but listeners who have eclectic tastes will realize that Aurora is a valuable addition to Cohen's catalog. ~ Alex Henderson
$9.99

Jazz - Released August 13, 2013 | Sunnyside

Blending his unique fusion of classical, acoustic jazz, and Middle Eastern music with the talents of virtuoso Tel Aviv pianist Nitai Hershkovits, Duende is a rare collaborative effort from Israeli bassist Avishai Cohen. Recorded in Sweden over just three days, the follow-up to 2011's Seven Seas features cover versions of John Coltrane's "Central Park West," Thelonious Monk's "Criss Cross," and Cole Porter's "All of You" alongside several new compositions including "Signature," "Soof," and "Ann's Tune." ~ Jon O'Brien
$14.99
$9.99

Jazz - Released June 14, 2019 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res
$12.99

Jazz - Released January 22, 2016 | Concord Records, Inc.

$12.99

Jazz - Released January 22, 2016 | Concord Records, Inc.

Avishai Cohen's third CD for the Stretch Records label, Colors, features the talented bassist, composer, arranger, producer, and pianist trusting his own imagination and intelligence in order to capture the auras of chord progressions and rhythmic patterns with this excellent use of musical metaphors. The composer wrote 13 selections for this program and each is a meeting of artistic colors, each rare and emanating its own originality through Cohen's sense of harmony, expansive tones, and polyrhythms. His earthy placement of "Shay Ke," a warm, ballad filled with the funk-Middle Eastern oud solo of Amos Hoffman, vocals of Claudia Acuna, and individual gifts from Jimmy Greene on soprano saxophone, is a prime example of Cohen's ability to realize his maturing non-conformism. The inclusion of Avi Lebovich on trombone in addition to Steve Davis, makes the experiences of his circle of friends a splendid chance to grow musically. Orchestrated for a string quartet, two trombones and soprano saxophone, "Colors," clings to you long after the song is over and is one of those songs that you are likely to forge a lasting relationship with. In other words, its potential to become a jazz standard is there. Avishai Cohen plays acoustic and electric bass, piano, provides vocals, arranges, and produces this excellent collection of essential music. Joined by Jason Lindner on piano, Steve Davis and Avi Lebovich on trombones, Amos Hoffman on guitar and oud, Jimmy Greene on flute and soprano sax, the amazing Jeff Ballad on drums and percussion, and Claudia Acuna on vocals, the distinct colors that Avishai Cohen exudes here strike the perfect artful balance between composition and improvisation. ~ Paula Edelstein
$9.99

Jazz - Released August 30, 2011 | Sunnyside

4 stars out of 5 -- "At times, as on the gently gorgeous 'Hayo Hata,' his themes unfold with such power and drama there's almost no need for improvisation."

Jazz - Released November 4, 2013 | Parlophone France

Download not available
4 stars out of 5 -- "[T]he delicate balance of the pre-determined and the spontaneous is entirely persuasive....An instant classical/jazz hybrid classic."
$12.99

Jazz - Released January 22, 2016 | Concord Records, Inc.

Bassist Avishai Cohen's fourth Stretch release marks the debut of a new project, the International Vamp Band, which first went public in early 2001 in a series of performances at the Jazz Gallery in New York. Interestingly, Cohen is the band's pianist. He leaves the upright bass duties to Yagil Baras and only occasionally overdubs lines on electric bass. The other musicians are Diego Urcola on trumpet and flügelhorn, Yosvany Terry on alto and tenor saxophones and chekere, Avi Lebovich on trombone and flute, and Antonio Sanchez on drums. (Cohen's bass student Bryan Keleen guests on "Island Man.") While Cohen's piano playing is not virtuosic (although it comes close on the solo piece "Pause"), his intention is simply to approach bandleading from a different vantage point. Perhaps as a direct result, this new music boasts a rather expansive harmonic palette. It's hypnotic, as the term "vamp" would suggest, and it's often downright soothing -- which is appropriate, given that Cohen intended the album as a prayer for peace, particularly in his native Israel, which was descending into a state of war at the time of this recording. ~ David R. Adler
$14.99
$9.99

Jazz - Released October 28, 2014 | Anzic Records, LLC

Hi-Res

Jazz - Released October 30, 2009 | Parlophone France

Download not available
$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Concord Records

Bassist Avishai Cohen, best known at this point for his work with Chick Corea, on his own projects mixes together adventurous jazz with influences from world music, original folk melodies, and his own creativity. He composed 12 selections on his second CD, including tributes to Horace Silver and Chick Corea (which do not really sound that close to either of those pianist/composer's styles). The music is consistently unpredictable, with Cohen being joined by pianist Jason Lindner, drummer Jeff Ballard, Jimmy Greene on reeds, trombonist Steve Davis, guitarist Amos Hoffman, a string quartet, and up to five singers (who are mostly used in the background). An intriguing set by an up-and-coming composer who is also a very fluent bassist. ~ Scott Yanow
$17.49
$12.99

Jazz - Released September 22, 2017 | Masterworks

Hi-Res
Having come to prominence playing with legendary jazz pianist Chick Corea in the '90s, Israeli-born bassist Avishai Cohen has developed into a virtuoso performer and bandleader with a stylistically expansive sound. His aptly titled 2017 studio album, 1970, showcases this broad approach with a set of original compositions and traditional songs that harken back to the socially minded folk, pop and world fusion of his birth year. In many ways, 1970 is the amalgamation of several key influences that have shaped Cohen's creative life, including the Jewish folk music, pop, and Sephardic Ladino songs his mother played for him while he was growing up. It's also tangibly apparent that legendary bassist Jaco Pastorius' genre-bending style and collaborations with pop artists like Joni Mitchell were also major touchstones for Cohen. Along with his fluid bass technique, much of the album is built around Cohen's voice. Blessed with a warm, naturally resonant baritone, Cohen isn't so much a virtuoso singer as a soulful presence at the microphone. It's a sound he showcases to pleasant effect throughout much of 1970, and one which brings to mind the organic vibe of artists like Terry Callier and Eric Clapton. Helping to achieve his stylistically integrative sound are many of the musicians who make up his expansive Eastern Unit Project, including vocalist Karen Malka, keyboardist Jonatan Daskal, drummer Tal Kohavi, guitarist Sherrod Barnes, percussionist Itamar Doari, and others. Together, they play a groove-oriented, jam-friendly style that's equal parts '70s soul-funk group, and traditional world music ensemble. There's a passionate, earthy spirituality to many of the songs on 1970 like the opening "Song of Hope," in which Cohen pleads for global unity against a moody R&B beat. He then gets more personal with the funky, wah-wah guitar-inflected "My Lady," singing "Have I told you that I love you, babe/Well, if I haven't then I misbehaved/You're the woman that has gotten me saved/From my loneliness..." Elsewhere, he dives into the roiling traditional number "Se'I Yona," his voice framed in emotive harmony with Malka and Elyasaf Bishari's buoyant instrumentation. Cuts like his yearning, solo vocal and piano take on the Beatles' "For No One," his joyously funky, Latin-tinged cover of Harry T. Burleigh's "Motherless Child," and his kinetically amorous, salsa-infused arrangement of Ismael Quintana's "Vamonos Pa'l Monte" are also delightfully compelling. While it's not a jazz album in any strict sense, there is a freedom and openness to the music on 1970 that feels very much in keeping with Cohen's past efforts. It's that openness, and the balance that comes from taking inspiration from the past while looking toward a brighter future that helps make 1970 such an uplifting experience. ~ Matt Collar
$1.49

Jazz - Released February 23, 2018 | Masterworks

$8.99

Jazz - Released June 1, 2003 | Fresh Sound Records

Artist

Avishai Cohen (b) in the magazine
  • The Qobuz Minute #30
    The Qobuz Minute #30 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...