Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$12.99

Tango - Released September 13, 2005 | Nonesuch

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Of all his recordings, Tango: Zero Hour is the album that the great reformer of Argentinean tango was the most proud of. The one in which he threw all his soul, offering it to his grandchildren saying: “Here’s what we did with our lives! Here’s how complex we were”. In 1986, weary of recording tracks in a hurry for producers, the bandoneonist and composer used his fresh but trustworthy relationship with Kip Hanrahan, a Latin jazz musician and director from New York, to work on the album of his dreams. Tango: Zero Hour. According to Piazzolla, the first sixty minutes past midnight represent the ultimate end and absolute beginning, and inspired him, as such, for one of the most refined and admirable works of his career. This time, each partition was carefully polished and memorised in every detail by his faithful musicians of Quinteto Tango Nuevo. Violinist Fernando Suárez Paz, pianist Pablo Ziegler, guitarist Horacio Malvicino and double bassist Hector Console had been playing together with Piazzolla for seven years. At that point, they were at one with his revolutionary tango. Each sentence, each sound, were played and placed at the exact spot, in the exact manner designed by the master. But this watchmaking-worthy perfection of execution didn’t prevent the work from exhaling emotion and sensuality. There are masterpieces for which superlatives lack, and a single listen of Tango: Zero Hour places it among them. © BM/Qobuz
From
CD$10.49

Tango - Released March 5, 2021 | Warner Classics

From
CD$12.99

Tango - Released September 13, 2005 | Nonesuch

This fine Astor Piazzolla album came on the heels of the tango innovator's universally praised Tango: Zero Hour from 1986. Back again for this outing are Quinteto Nueva Tango members like pianist Pablo Zinger and violinist Fernando Suarez Paz, with guest spots being filled by bassist Andy Gonzalez and Latin jazz alto sax star Paquito d'Rivera. Piazzolla, of course, is in top form throughout, tossing off a wealth of passionate and complex bandoneon solos. Producer Kip Hanrahan also returns from the Zero Hour sessions, providing another spacious-sounding backdrop for the proceedings. Unlike Zero Hour, though, Rough Dancer has more of whimsical feel, with the often perilous shifts in tempo and mood of the earlier record being handled in smoother fashion here. This is possibly due to the fact this piece was used for the musical production Tango Apasionado, which chronicles the history of the tango from its Buenos Aires roots to modern times. Along with Tango: Zero Hour, this Piazzolla release is a must for all his fans and tango lovers in general. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$13.99
CD$9.99

Tango - Released April 26, 2013 | Challenge Classics

Hi-Res
The worldwide growth of interest in Astor Piazzolla's music may have slowed somewhat, but part of the appeal of his works lies in their protean adaptability to almost any instrumental combination, and performances by new groups continue to appear. This one, by the Netherlands' Isabelle van Keulen Ensemble playing a variety of Piazzolla favorites, seems straightforward enough, but actually no one has released one quite like it. Van Keulen's group is a quartet, with violin (van Keulen herself), bandoneón, piano, and double bass. This is smaller than any of the groups that would have played this music originally, and the effect is fascinating. The double keyboards capture virtually all of the harmonic-motivic content of Piazzolla's compositions, but the added improvisatory elements on electric guitar (in his famous quintet formations), jazz saxophone or flute, drums, and other instruments are missing. The result is a sort of distillation of Piazzolla's compositions, more "classical" in its effect even than Gidon Kremer's best-selling Piazzolla recordings, which have a good dose of fantasy overlaid on the music. The selection includes a good number of the best-known Piazzolla compositions; the most famous of all, Adiós Nonino, is not included, but that one has been recorded in plenty of other places. For newcomers to Piazzolla the best place to start is still probably with his own recordings, but this intriguingly dispassionate version will be of interest to those looking for ways to present Piazzolla in classical concert settings. © James Manheim /TiVo
From
CD$4.99

Tango - Released April 1, 2020 | World Music Records

From
CD$8.99

Tango - Released July 21, 2014 | Trova Industrias Musicales

From
CD$8.99

Tango - Released May 1, 2003 | Soundset

From
CD$12.99

Tango - Released September 13, 2005 | Nonesuch

Recorded with his quintet and originally released in the late '80s, La Camorra features some of tango master Astor Piazzolla's finest moments. The album was recorded after Piazzolla's last major U.S. tour, and La Camorra highlights the intensity of his composition as well as his playing. © TiVo

Tango - Released March 6, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

Download not available
From
CD$4.99

Tango - Released April 6, 2019 | Play Music

From
CD$11.49

Tango - Released March 15, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Recorded at the Montreux Festival of 1986, The New Tango is an album of collaboration between the undisputed leader of the nuevo tango movement, Astor Piazzolla, and American vibe master Gary Burton. All of the pieces on the album were written by Piazzolla over the course of some 40 years of work, along with one special composition, "Vibraphonissimo," written expressly for Burton's usage. Surprisingly enough -- given the virtuosity and coherence that one receives on the album -- there were a mere three rehearsals prior to the recorded performance. As the listener finds out, the vibraphone is perfectly suited to the tango; or at the very least, that Gary Burton is fully capable of the job. As with all of Piazzolla's albums, the chances of disappointment are quite slim, with a special amount of attention given here to details by all musicians involved. Any fan of the nuevo tango or Piazzolla will be pleased as usual. Fans of Gary Burton or jazz vibes may find the album surprisingly good as it shows the versatility of the vibraphonist. As Fernando Gonzalez once said, "this music knows many dialects. And listens. There are no lines drawn and no sides to defend. This is new tango." © Adam Greenberg /TiVo
From
CD$7.99

Tango - Released June 22, 1999 | eOne Music International Classics

A slightly older release from Astor Piazzolla on the old Atoll label. A number of tracks feature Jose Angel Trelles singing, along with the band that Piazzolla had put together. The tangos are, as always, perfection (this is what Piazzolla did, and he did it very well). There are some relative rarities here, such as "Jeanne Y Paul" and "Olhos de Resaca." among others. The orchestration can become a bit too dense from time to time (such as on "Oblivion 2"), but the craftsmanship is still generally superb. In general, this album contains works that are somewhat denser than Piazzolla's usually sparse style, and perhaps at a lower tempo than much of his work. The vocal work by Trelles is reminiscent in ways of Horacio Ferrer's work in the Maria de Buenos Aires opera (and indeed, a few of the songs Trelles sings are from the opera), and in many ways simply similar to a flamenco singer. The album is perhaps more rare than much of Piazzolla's work, which has in large part been re-released, but it may be worth the effort to find for a collector. For newcomers, a multitude of other albums would stand in rather better as an introduction. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Tango - Released January 1, 2009 | Magenta

From
CD$10.49

Tango - Released June 12, 2012 | Le Chant du Monde

Booklet
From
CD$8.99

Tango - Released September 1, 1990 | Carosello Records

From
CD$8.99

Tango - Released February 21, 2006 | Trova Industrias Musicales S.A.

From
CD$12.99

Tango - Released February 20, 2001 | Milan Records

From
CD$8.99

Tango - Released January 1, 2013 | El Bandoneón

From
CD$12.99

Tango - Released March 9, 2004 | Milan Records