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Classical - Released March 3, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 9, 2002 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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"Personal maturity and humility are vitally important in the face of Beethoven's tragic character." That quotation opens the booklet included in DG's deluxe packaging of Anne-Sophie Mutter's new recording of Beethoven's Violin Concerto and violin Romances. The statement ironically illuminates the two fundamental flaws of Mutter's performances: they are themselves neither mature nor humble. Is it humility that caused Mutter to overload her performance of the concerto with incessant tempo rubato, deliberately twisting Beethoven's classically shaped concerto into a series of disjunct and disparate gestures? Is it humility that caused Mutter to burden her performances of the two Romances with a tone so lush and an interpretation so sensual that Beethoven's coy little charmers become lascivious seductresses? And is it maturity that caused Mutter -- arguably one of the greatest violinists of her generation -- to impose her interpretive will on Beethoven, arguably one of the greatest composers who ever lived? For all the many beauties of Mutter's performance -- and her performance is often drop-dead gorgeous -- her interpretation is so self-serving, so lacking in either maturity or humility, that one cannot recommend it except as an exercise in empty beauty. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 10, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
All these Penderecki works have been commissioned by Anne-Sophie Mutter and are duly dedicated to her (as well as to double bass player Roman Patkoló in the case of the 2010 Duo concertante for violin and double bass), this is thus doing them justice to gather them under the same helm. We go crescendo, from La Follia for solo violin from 2013, a series of variations, up to the Violin Sonata No. 2, « Metamorphosen » from 1995—conducted here by the composer himself—to the already mentioned Duo concertante and the Sonata for violin and piano from 1999. As so many composers from his era—let’s remember he was born in 1933—Penderecki has taken the “backward path”, starting as a composer in the path underlined by serialism, before straying away from it to come back to a much more melodic language, almost tonal and even sometimes Post-Romantic. For such a talented violinist as Anne-Sophie Mutter, fed with beauty and virtuosity, these works represent both an endless renewal and a constant challenge, while allowing her to develop her sonority and her passionate lyricism. Let’s note that these Metamorphosen have been recorded in 1997, and the partition’s ink had barely had time to dry. Incidentally, the other recordings have all been close to the writing date, underlining the emotional and artistic closeness of the two characters. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 25, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 14, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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It’s difficult to resist such a prestigious title. In January 2020, John Williams, 87, returned to Vienna to head the Wiener Philharmoniker in the Soldener Saal of the Vienna Musikverein. In another era, the sound of this album would have matched the event in all its spectacle, grandeur, radiance and sheer detail. Nevertheless, hearing such well put-together, brilliantly orchestrated and colourful music (Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977, Spielberg, and Jaws, 1975, also Spielberg) remains a pleasure at all times. With fervent enthusiasm on Devil’s Dance from The Witches of Eastwick (George Miller, 1987), violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter displays all of her virtuosity (and incredibly complicated violin playing) here without fear for the ‘lack of taste’ that she is so often reproached for! We now hope the Wiener Philharmoniker continue their exploration of the Hollywood music discography with diligence, daring to take on Bernard Herrman, Erich Wolfang Korngold, Copland and others. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 3, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 30, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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It was in the depths of her native Black Forest that Anne-Sophie Mutter first encountered John Williams’ music. The violinist recalls that there was not much else to do in that magical setting apart from play the violin, go for a walk, play football or go to the cinema. So in 1978, when Star Wars was released, the young girl discovered the existence of the man who was already a film score legend in Hollywood, largely thanks to Steven Spielberg’s Jaws. In this album, which includes new arrangements of some of John Williams’ iconic film music, she reinterprets excerpts from Georges Lucas’ saga, such as the lyrical piece Rey’s Theme from Episode VII, the mystical Yoda’s Theme, as well as Across the Stars, a melancholic romantic song from Star Wars: Attack of The Clones. Some of John Williams’ other great classics also feature on the album, including Hedwig’s Theme (which Mutter describes as “Harry Potter meets Paganini”), and Schindler’s List (whose solo violin part was originally played by the great Itzhak Perlman). Alongside these legendary pieces, the album also includes more original choices, such as an excerpt from the soundtrack of Tintin and the Secret of the Unicorn (the tense piece The Duel), as well as a glamourous waltz from Sabrina (Sydney Pollack’s remake of Billy Wilder’s famous film). Across the Stars was recorded at the Sony Pictures Scoring Stage in Hollywood, where so many iconic scores were born, from The Wizard of Oz and Lawrence of Arabia to Singin’ in the Rain and E.T., the latter unfortunately missing from this nevertheless vibrant and invigorating record. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Quintets - Released November 3, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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It is not just a matter of showbiz that sees the names of Anne-Sophie Mutter and Daniil Trifonov written in big letters on the cover of this CD (well... even bigger than Schubert's name, but let's let that lie): in fact, they play on all the pieces in the album, and in particular the famous Trout Quintet (wiith Hwayoon Lee on the viola, Roman Patkoló on the double bass and Maximilian Hornung on the cello), but also the movement of trio D 897, "Notturno" - whose name was added by an editor, whereas it appears that this was a movement originally written for the trio in B flat then set aside - and the two Lieder adapted for violin and piano respectively, by Jascha Heifetz and Mischa Elman. First among equals, Mutter leads proceedings with both energy and a delicate touch, and it's a safe bet that although this is only the latest in a long line of recordings of this quicksilver masterpiece by Schubert, it will soon find a prominent place in the discographic hall of fame. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 14, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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When she was a fresh 15-year-old violinist in 1978, Anne-Sophie Mutter made her recording debut with a coupling of Mozart's Third and Fifth Violin Concertos with Herbert von Karajan conducting the Berlin Philharmonic. Now as an accomplished 42-year-old virtuoso in 2003, Mutter has recorded all five of Mozart's violin concertos plus his Sinfonia Concertante with herself conducting the London Philharmonic. The inevitable question is "how do they compare" and the unfortunate answer is "not too well." As a violinist, Mutter's tone has grown more gorgeous as her technique has become more effortless, but the ineffable charm and evanescent delight of her earlier recording is nowhere to be found. Where the 15-year-old was discovering and savoring the joyous beauty of Mozart's music, the 42-year-old woman is using that beauty to display her tone and technique. And where the younger violinist had as an accompanist a conductor of consummate control in Karajan, the older virtuoso has nobody between her and the overly responsive but often clumsy London Philharmonic and the results are just about technically acceptable and a far cry from the completely commanding Karajan. Like a pitcher needs a catcher and a writer needs an editor, a soloist needs an accompanist. Violist Yuri Bashmet plays Cary Grant to Mutter's Katharine Hepburn and while the sparks do fly in the Sinfonia concertante, there's no one in the director's chair to yell cut. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is very clear, very close, and very cool. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 27, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1978 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 28, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The vogue for performing classical music in nightclubs has seemed to recede in its original homeland, the U.S., but not so in Europe, with the icily perfect Anne-Sophie Mutter as the somewhat unlikely representative of the trend. Mutter, who was apparently inspired to try this by her 20-something children, shows why she's one of the world's greats, adapting to the demands of the medium, and by all appearances having a lot of fun. Mutter and a handpicked group called Mutter's Virtuosi, featuring the superb Mahan Esfahani on harpsichord, essentially offer a program of familiar late Romantic tunes that might have been heard in the nightclub's nearest analogue of a century ago, the Viennese café, spicing it up with syncopated material (Gershwin and the Jamaican Rumba) on one hand, and Vivaldi and Bach on the other. Mutter pushes herself into tempo extremes she might not ordinarily try, and she gets a big cheer from the crowd with a couple of movements of the Vivaldi Four Seasons and, more unexpectedly, two Bach concerto movements. The whole thing has a loose, enthusiastic feel with the flavor of Mutter showing the youngsters what she can do, and it may be that she's hit on a more promising direction for such releases than her much younger American counterparts. Recommended and fun. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1984 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 4, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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"Performing contemporary music had added immeasurably to the way I play Tchaikovsky's Concerto," writes violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter in the liner notes to her second recording of the work in 20 years. To be more precise, what performing contemporary music has added to Mutter's performance of Tchaikovsky's concerto is an abrasive tone, an aggressive technique, and an interpretation that treats Tchaikovsky's tender little concerto as if it were a lover who liked it rough and raw. Although there is no denying Mutter's virtuosity, her performance is at best willful and at worst wrongful. "Anne-Sophie makes the structure of Korngold's piece clearer than anyone else," writes conductor André Previn in the liner notes of his wife's performance of Korngold's Violin Concerto. To be more precise, it is Previn who makes the structure clearer, who, indeed, makes this the most persuasive performance of the piece ever recorded. An old hand at the music of Korngold, Previn's sensitive conducting shapes an ardent but cogent performance, a performance that lets Korngold's lines sing and soar but always in context of a convincing structure. Mutter, who thankfully has not added any hint of "contemporary music" to Korngold's neo-Romantic piece, plays with all the subtlety, taste, and beauty of which she is capable. The result is one of the most completely compelling performances of the work ever recorded. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is transparent with a slight hint of reverberation. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 13, 2006 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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In 2006, to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's birth plus the 30th anniversary of Anne-Sophie Mutter's public debut, Deutsche Grammophon released new recordings of the German violinist in all the Austrian composer's major works featuring her instrument. To celebrate Mutter's undeniable beauty, each body of works was released with a different photograph of Mutter on the cover: the set of concertos had Mutter poured into a stunning bottle green mermaid gown, the set of sonatas had Mutter wrapped in a shimmering golden yellow strapless gown, and this set of the piano trios has Mutter's wonderfully made-up face and marvelously coifed hair in close-up. And just as no one but a blind man would deny Mutter's beauty, no one but a deaf man would deny Mutter's standing as one of the great violinists of her age with flawless intonation, faultless technique, a sensual tone, and a warmly romantic interpretive style. Of course, some might say that a warmly romantic interpretive style is out of place in the transcendently elegant works of Mozart. Others might point out that Mutter plays with impeccable taste and consummate control in these three late piano trios, but even they might concede that her performances are perhaps too sweet and possibly too ardent for the sublimely graceful Mozart. Cellist Daniel Müller-Schott and pianist André Previn are united behind Mutter and their performance is as one with Mutter in style and approach. For some, this disc will be a lovely addition to their Mutter collection. For others, the classic recording by the Beaux Arts Trio may seem closer to the classical style of the music. DG's sound is very flattering to Mutter, but puts Müller-Schott and Previn a bit too far in the background. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Anne-Sophie Mutter in the magazine
  • Anne-Sophie Mutter: Qobuz Video Interview
    Anne-Sophie Mutter: Qobuz Video Interview We met Anne-Sophie Mutter for an exclusive interview in Paris. The famous German violinist talks about the recording for her Dvořák album with the Berliner Philharmoniker and provides an insight in...