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R&B/Soul - Released October 9, 2007 | J Records

Accomplished neo-soul queen Angie Stone's second solo outing, Mahogany Soul, delivers more of the organic, gritty, rootsy yet sophisticated soul which put her on the map as a solo artist. The production is great and the songs are funky, mature, and intelligent, but when she truly shines is when she actually spreads her wings and glides away from her neo-soul trappings, which she manages effortlessly. The album's true gem is the smoldering, gorgeous, aching "Wish I Didn't Miss You," which pulls forward with an unstoppable beat and features a stellar, yearning performance from Miss Stone. Other highlights include the mesmerizing first single (produced by Raphael Saadiq), "Brotha," which draws the listener in with its atypical, almost hypnotizing beat. "Snowflakes" is a lighter-than-air, breezy winner, and her duet with Musiq Soulchild, "The Ingredients of Love," is silky, funky, and sweet. The album tends to wane toward the second half, with just a little too much emphasis on the neo-soul recipe, but nonetheless remains engaging with other winners like "20 Dollars," the sweet and easy "Life Goes On," and the organ-enhanced "Time of the Month" popping up to maintain the listener's interest. Despite a few lulls, Mahogany Soul stands as one of the best R&B albums of 2001 and keeps the listener anxiously waiting to see what Angie Stone will do next. ~ Jose F. Promis

Soul - Released September 18, 2012 | BRM - Peace Bisquit

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R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Concord Records, Inc.

The re-launched Stax label is an appropriate home for neo-soulster Angie Stone. Her 2007 album The Art of Love & War nods to classic styles, blending funk, soul, balladry, and R&B in one tasty package. The appearance of soul great Betty Wright on the album highlight "Baby" only strengthens the retro vibe. Yet The Art of Love & War is contemporary through and through. Shimmering with a modern, digital production sheen, the album is clearly steeped in urban contemporary R&B, more lush and languid than stripped down and raw. Stone is no mere puppet of the past (and apparently neither is the revamped Stax): her voice, delivery, and feel are all her own, whether on butter-smooth love songs ("Make It Last") or hard-swinging groovers ("Play wit It").
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Soul - Released November 6, 2015 | Shanachie

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Throughout her career, Angie Stone rose in stature to become one of the pioneers of nu-soul, alongside her compatriots (and ex) D’Angelo, Erykah Badu, and Maxwell. This privileged status allowed her to work with the largest names in the business, including Mary J. Blige, Stevie Wonder, Alicia Keys, Mantronix, and even Lenny Kravitz. For the recording of this, her seventh album, the South Carolina born singer decamped with the producer Walter W. Millsap III, who previously worked with both Mariah Carey and Jennifer Lopez. ‘She is at once a star, a workaholic, and a creative guru’, says Millsap, when discussing Angie Stone. Despite this glowing acclaim, the record nearly didn’t happen… the singer had planned to give up on the project! As Stone put it, ‘I was tired of the hellish and repetitive cadences of the artist’s life. Having to prove again and again that I was capable. I thought that people didn’t like me anymore. I thought that, now that I was down, I’d never get up again… it’s really Walter W. Millsap III who got me out of this situation’. Leaving aside some of the tabloid sensation that has followed Stone around in recent years, largely centring on her violent altercations with her daughter, this album is light years ahead of some of the musical competition… Listening to this dream of a record gives you all that you could ever need! At 50 years old, Angie Stone still offers a supremely groovy voice. Classic in its form, the soul of this album presents itself as one long, refined moment. The arrangements, which showcase a production of the greatest sobriety, should emphasize a soul sister that has far from uttered her last word. © CM/Qobuz
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R&B - Released January 1, 2009 | Concord Records, Inc.

On her second album for Concord’s Stax imprint (and fifth overall), Angie Stone delves deeper into funk and hip-hop than on her previous outings. Her last offering, The Art of Love & War, was a critical and commercial triumph for the vastly underrated vocalist, and topped the Billboard chart. With a slew of producers including Sly Williams, Willie “Chuck” Shivers, Karrim King and Fitzroy Reid, Steven “Supe” White, Jonathan Richmond, Jazze Pha, and Stone herself, these dozen tracks continue to reveal her versatility as a vocalist and recording artist; she can sing whatever it is she wants to with equal verve, authenticity, and flair. Despite the slicker and more diverse sounds on Unexpected, the soul quotient is high, even if this isn’t strictly a neo-soul album. The new beat consciousness reveals itself most on the title track, which is hard funk at its 2009 best. Cuts such as “Free” might have come right out of the 1990s with their use of careening synths, shimmering hip-hop beats, and colliding loops. But the melody is solid, its chorus and refrain catchy. “I Found a Keeper” is another; its production, arrangement, and structure actually feel like it was recorded in the 1990s -- and is at least reminiscent in spirit to material by the trio MoKenStef. But these are not complaints. Stone’s voice is so strident and drenched in soul that even the harpsichord sound on the latter track can’t overpower it. The one complaint is the utterly unnecessary use of Auto-Tune on a beautiful song like “Tell Me” -- the synths and dancefloor beats are one thing, but the inclusion of this device just feels plain alien on this track. For fans worried that Stone abandoned her old-school sound completely, they needn’t worry. The first single, “I Ain’t Hearin’ You,” is drenched in neo-soul grooves, as are “Think Sometimes,” “I Don’t Care,” and the gorgeous ballads “All Over Your Body” and “Why Is It.” If one goes back to Angie Stone’s debut album, Black Diamond, and follows the progression of her sound, it will be obvious that there has been a continued and restless path of growth and experimentation. Unexpected simply feels like a leap more than a step. ~ Thom Jurek
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R&B - Released August 28, 2012 | Saguaro Road Records

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R&B - Released June 5, 2012 | Time-Life Music

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R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Stax

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R&B - Released September 11, 2015 | Shanachie

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Pop - Released October 25, 2005 | J Records

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Angie Stone came to prominence at a time when neo-soul divas were exploding faster than pop rocks. With the chart onslaught of Jill Scott, Mary J. Blige, and Macy Gray, it was easy for Stone to get lost in the undertow of media hype surrounding the movement. But quietly and evenhandedly she amassed a three-record set of smooth neo-soul and contemporary R&B numbers that rival and sometimes best the output of her contemporaries. So it seems premature in a five-year career to have a best-of compilation out, but these 15 selections (featuring a couple newly minted tunes mixed in for good measure and buyer incentive) add up to a most satisfying listening experience. With her vocal delivery, Stone belts tunes out better than most (save for Scott, but comparing vocal stylings between the two is comparing apples and oranges), and covers some of soul music's more obscure classics, making them her own with reverence and ease. And it seems that with each new release she becomes more focused and distinct from her contemporaries, and as a result turns out one of the better greatest-hits compilations from this era. It'll be interesting to see the direction Angie Stone travels next. ~ Rob Theakston
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R&B - Released July 5, 2004 | J Records

With the success of her previous hit single, "Wish I Didn't Miss You," Angie Stone went from being trapped in a pack of neo-soul divas going straight to the bargain bin to being one of the first singers off the tip of the tongue when the word "neo-soul" was uttered. After nearly a two-year absence, Stone Love pleasantly picks up where Mahogany Soul left off, presenting a wiser, more even-keel Stone putting her best foot forward right from the album's onset. The useless guest appearance of the tired Snoop Dogg and his "izzle" façade does very little to improve the quality of the lead single, "I Wanna Thank Ya" -- if anything, it detracts from the song's overall atmosphere with constant interruptions that do nothing but serve as reminders that the Dogg is not having one of his better days (check out the version at the end without Snoop's rap for a contrast). That said, guest appearances by Floetry and Betty Wright help Stone Love pick up steam, and an exceptional performance by Anthony Hamilton on "Stay for a While" invokes muses present during the recording of D'Angelo's Voodoo and Stevie Wonder's Innervisions. The production crew is the most solid it's ever been on any of her records and the choice of sampling is premium (check the knockout sample of Dynasty's "Adventures in the Land of Music" used in "Lovers' Ghetto") but kept at a minimum, a tribute to the inventiveness of Stone and company behind the mixing console. And while there's no barnburning anthem of the type that fueled Mahogany Soul's longevity and despite some totally unnecessary interludes, this is her most focused and accomplished full-length to date. A delightful album for a summer day, and (save for the Snoop cameo) an enjoyable listen from start to finish. ~ Rob Theakston
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Electronic/Dance - Released May 30, 2006 | J Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 28, 2006 | J Records

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R&B - Released September 15, 2005 | J Records

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R&B - Released September 21, 2004 | J Records

R&B - Released June 21, 2004 | J Records

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R&B - Released September 25, 2012 | Saguaro Road Rhythm

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R&B - Released September 25, 2012 | Saguaro Road Rhythm

Those who have found something to enjoy in each one of Angie Stone's albums might be confused by the singer's liner notes for Rich Girl, the singer's first album for Saguaro Road. She alludes to having done too much collaborative work in the recent past, declaring "I shaved a lot of my originality off when merging with so many other people." Her outside projects haven't been all that numerous, and she is joined here by around two dozen fellow songwriters and roughly half as many co-producers. On one hand, who's to argue with an artist who says her new work is more herself than the material from her recent past? On the other, this album doesn't offer as many high points as her two previous Stax albums, and it's as scattered quality-wise as it is stylistically diverse. Stone's beaming, easygoing nature and typically excellent vocals save the majority of the substandard material. Some fans will be dismayed by the shortage of throwbacks to classic soul, but "U Lit My Fire" is a knockout, one that begins with a sly Taana Gardner fake-out before settling into one of her most seductive numbers. If Stone really wanted to get back to basics, she could have made a whole album with the terminally undervalued Mike City. His smacking but smoothened grooves are a great fit, heard on the synthesizer-laced disco funk of "Backup Plan" and the stout hip-hop bounce of "Right in Front of Me" (the latter something like Donell Jones' "Spend the Night" on weight gainer). ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released January 1, 2009 | Stax