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Soul - Released April 12, 2019 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Following Venice (2014), Malibu (2016) and Oxnard (2018), Anderson .Paak continues his tour of the west coast. Here, he’s arrived at Ventura, a love-letter to a neighboring town to the city of angels that flirts more with the fringes of old-school R&B and the new soul scene than his previous albums. This time, the Californian hasn’t waited 3 years to return to the studio, but just 5 months. Released on Dr Dre’s label Aftermath, Oxnard was compact and glossy, with a large number of featured artists (Pusha T, J Cole, Q Tip), but it was also more harshly criticized, even by his mother. Anderson opts for a return to his roots, with voluptuous R&B, fresh soul and cult rap, mixing timeless nostalgic flavorings with the modern era. To support his idea, there are even more carefully selected feats. For the silky softness of the 70’s/80’s, we find legend of the genre Smokey Robinson (Make It Better). For the 90’s golden age, Brandy (Jet Black).For the soul side, Anderson and Dre look to Donny’s daughter, Lalah Hathaway, on the groovy basslines of Reachin’2 Much, as well as Sonyae Elise (who already shows up in Malibu) and Jazmine Sullivan who was already on stage alongside Stevie Wonder at just 13 years old. But the two biggest surprises of the album are of course André 3000 in the opening track Come Home and especially Nate Dogg – who died in 2011 - on the gentle closing track What Can We Do?: both key figures of 90’s rap. The first put Atlanta back on the rap map with OutKast’s Dirty South and recently appeared on James Blake’s Where’s The Catch. The second was ubiquitous in the 90’s-00’s rap scene with legendary hooks and her G-Funk-rap-R&B formula alongside Warren G, Snoop and Xzibit. Anderson .Paak pays tribute to his elders and closes his fourth album in 39 minutes and 11 tracks. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 16, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

On Oxnard, Anderson .Paak continues his road trip along the Californian coast after Venice in 2014 and Malibu in 2016. By being at the centre of a delightful mix of Soul vocals, Funk Rap and Afro-Caribbean percussion, Anderson .Paak has taken a real step forward on each album. His versatility is a perfect symbiosis of the current Californian style (with independent teams such as TDE and SZA, Odd Future with The Internet or the ever-present label Stones Throw) kneaded together with the infectious rhythms of Tuxedo or Dâm-Funk. Going back to Oxnard, his hometown, Anderson .Paak also reconnects with the total freedom of this birthplace of erudite hippies that has already given birth to groove-lined specimens such as Madlib, Oh No, Kan Kick or Dudley Perkins. Oxnard synthesises this whole universe while simultaneously proposing a new direction.Oxnard is the rapper's first album on Dr. Dre’s label, Aftermath. Dre is also the executive producer for the project. And like he did with Kendrick Lamar’s Good Kid Maad City in 2012, Dr. Dre simplifies and polishes up Anderson Paak's already abundant formula to give it a more complete look - that of a tragicomic film about the Californian lifestyle in all its splendour. Each piece plays its role, all the details are thought out, meticulously planned so as to make Oxnard a major work in contemporary music. With a very rich instrumentation, its surprising structures and a few hand-picked guests such as Pusha T, J. Cole or the all-too rare Q-Tip, Anderson continues with his exploration of an ageless cultural gem: Funk. Oxnard is a natural evolution of the anarchic energy of George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic. He even allows himself the luxury of giving his gangsta version to the mixer/crooner to compress the all-powerful G-Funk of "Doggystyle" in each snare drum. Filled with symbols, Anderson Paak's words are explicitly sexual - with no filter - playing with the timeline of sticky music. It is with Anywhere, a track with Snoop Dogg, that this whole montage takes on its full meaning and takes the Californian singer to another level, enhanced by his raspy voice. © Aurélien Chapuis/Qobuz
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Soul - Released April 12, 2019 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Following Venice (2014), Malibu (2016) and Oxnard (2018), Anderson .Paak continues his tour of the west coast. Here, he’s arrived at Ventura, a love-letter to a neighboring town to the city of angels that flirts more with the fringes of old-school R&B and the new soul scene than his previous albums. This time, the Californian hasn’t waited 3 years to return to the studio, but just 5 months. Released on Dr Dre’s label Aftermath, Oxnard was compact and glossy, with a large number of featured artists (Pusha T, J Cole, Q Tip), but it was also more harshly criticized, even by his mother. Anderson opts for a return to his roots, with voluptuous R&B, fresh soul and cult rap, mixing timeless nostalgic flavorings with the modern era. To support his idea, there are even more carefully selected feats. For the silky softness of the 70’s/80’s, we find legend of the genre Smokey Robinson (Make It Better). For the 90’s golden age, Brandy (Jet Black).For the soul side, Anderson and Dre look to Donny’s daughter, Lalah Hathaway, on the groovy basslines of Reachin’2 Much, as well as Sonyae Elise (who already shows up in Malibu) and Jazmine Sullivan who was already on stage alongside Stevie Wonder at just 13 years old. But the two biggest surprises of the album are of course André 3000 in the opening track Come Home and especially Nate Dogg – who died in 2011 - on the gentle closing track What Can We Do?: both key figures of 90’s rap. The first put Atlanta back on the rap map with OutKast’s Dirty South and recently appeared on James Blake’s Where’s The Catch. The second was ubiquitous in the 90’s-00’s rap scene with legendary hooks and her G-Funk-rap-R&B formula alongside Warren G, Snoop and Xzibit. Anderson .Paak pays tribute to his elders and closes his fourth album in 39 minutes and 11 tracks. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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R&B - Released January 15, 2016 | Steel Wool - OBE - Art Club - EMPIRE

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 4, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 19, 2020 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 15, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

On Oxnard, Anderson .Paak continues his road trip along the Californian coast after Venice in 2014 and Malibu in 2016. By being at the centre of a delightful mix of Soul vocals, Funk Rap and Afro-Caribbean percussion, Anderson .Paak has taken a real step forward on each album. His versatility is a perfect symbiosis of the current Californian style (with independent teams such as TDE and SZA, Odd Future with The Internet or the ever-present label Stones Throw) kneaded together with the infectious rhythms of Tuxedo or Dâm-Funk. Going back to Oxnard, his hometown, Anderson .Paak also reconnects with the total freedom of this birthplace of erudite hippies that has already given birth to groove-lined specimens such as Madlib, Oh No, Kan Kick or Dudley Perkins. Oxnard synthesises this whole universe while simultaneously proposing a new direction.Oxnard is the rapper's first album on Dr. Dre’s label, Aftermath. Dre is also the executive producer for the project. And like he did with Kendrick Lamar’s Good Kid Maad City in 2012, Dr. Dre simplifies and polishes up Anderson Paak's already abundant formula to give it a more complete look - that of a tragicomic film about the Californian lifestyle in all its splendour. Each piece plays its role, all the details are thought out, meticulously planned so as to make Oxnard a major work in contemporary music. With a very rich instrumentation, its surprising structures and a few hand-picked guests such as Pusha T, J. Cole or the all-too rare Q-Tip, Anderson continues with his exploration of an ageless cultural gem: Funk. Oxnard is a natural evolution of the anarchic energy of George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic. He even allows himself the luxury of giving his gangsta version to the mixer/crooner to compress the all-powerful G-Funk of "Doggystyle" in each snare drum. Filled with symbols, Anderson Paak's words are explicitly sexual - with no filter - playing with the timeline of sticky music. It is with Anywhere, a track with Snoop Dogg, that this whole montage takes on its full meaning and takes the Californian singer to another level, enhanced by his raspy voice. © Aurélien Chapuis/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 17, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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R&B - Released April 12, 2019 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

Still climbing in 2019, Anderson .Paak won a Best Rap Performance Grammy award for "Bubblin" and returned in April with Ventura, at which point his preceding Oxnard wasn't even six months old. Although Oxnard and Ventura were laid down during the same sessions, the latter is neither leftovers nor a patchwork of adequate material that didn't fit on the former. Rather remarkably, it's the self-termed rap singer's tightest and most concentrated album yet. There's no space allowed for interlude hijinks or wayward diversions. Moreover, R&B is favored to such an extent that Paak delivers what could be called host verses on only a couple tracks, and gets only one guest verse, a tongue-twisting, side-splitting contribution from André 3000. Paak devotes most of these 40 minutes to relating the ups and downs of intimacy. On the early-'70s throwback "Come Home," he drops to his knees with a sideways glance to humorously critique the condition of contemporary R&B ("No one even begs anymore!"), then gets Motown legend Smokey Robinson to assist on "Make It Better," another misty number with aching emotion. Paak uncannily matches up with a posthumous Nate Dogg vocal on "What Can We Do," but what truly elevates the album is its sequence of songs with Lalah Hathaway, Brandy, Jazmine Sullivan, and Sonyae Elise, collaborations laying out scenes of co-dependency and contentment with a dangerous dalliance somewhere between. The women's presence as singers and co-writers also helps balance out some of Paak's candidly disparaging and lecherous behavior. Side two does feature consecutive tracks that aren't libidinal, yet the emotions are as mixed. "Yada Yada" catches Paak at boiling point, boastful about his come-up and the benefits of stardom but acidic toward the industry while regretting time away from his son. A righteous anger bubbles under the surface of "King James," an all-for-one motivational jam that acknowledges the activism of namesake LeBron James and Colin Kaepernick. From the lithe and rich basslines to sweetened strings -- among the many elements courtesy of Paak's Free Nationals live band and other long-term associates -- the album is a treat to the ears. It's unmistakably in the tradition of soul and funk older than the artist himself, but could not have been made any earlier than the late 2010s. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released October 28, 2014 | Steel Wool - OBE - EMPIRE

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R&B - Released January 15, 2016 | Steel Wool - OBE - Art Club - EMPIRE

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R&B - Released April 6, 2018 | 2018 OBE, LLC.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 17, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 17, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 3, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 20, 2015 | Young Art Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 17, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 13, 2018 | Aftermath - 12 Tone Music, LLC

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R&B - Released January 10, 2016 | Steel Wool - OBE - Art Club - EMPIRE

R&B - Released May 8, 2017 | Steel Wool - OBE - Art Club - EMPIRE

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