Albums

$90.49

International Pop - Released November 27, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

International Pop - Released December 10, 2007 | WEA

Download not available

International Pop - Released July 6, 2018 | Profil

Booklet
Download not available
$39.49

Crooners - Released August 26, 1994 | RCA Bluebird

$25.49

International Pop - Released October 6, 2006 | RCA Records Label

$79.49
$65.49

Crooners - Released November 20, 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Filling in a gap in Frank Sinatra's history, Legacy's 2015 box A Voice on Air collects over 100 radio broadcasts recorded between 1935 and 1955. This is the first collection to chronicle this era -- over 90 of its 100 tracks are previously unreleased -- and it's pulled from a variety of sources, including the Sinatra estate's vaults, the Library of Congress, and the Paley Center for Media, each strand assisting in sterling re-creations of original broadcasts from Frank's bobbysocks days, World War II, and the nascent saloon singer of the '50s. Sinatra wound up singing some of these songs in the studio but not necessarily in these arrangements, a wrinkle that would be tantalizing enough but a good portion of A Voice on Air is devoted to songs he only sang on the air. Some of these are little more than novelties -- the flashiest being "(Li'l Abner) Don't Marry That Gal," a song co-written by cartoonist Al Capp cashing in on his hit strip -- and there is a fair share of duets, with both musicians (Nat King Cole, Slim Gaillard) and cultural figures (Gov. Jimmie Davis comes in to sing his "You Are My Sunshine"). Part of the appeal of this set is how the very fact that it's grounded in specific years accentuates transience: there are jokes that need footnotes, broadcasts from World War II, commercials for cigarettes, and other musty conventions that never quite seep onto Sinatra's studio recordings. Here, they're part of the main text. There might be a fair amount of standards peppered throughout the set but they're unwitting anchors for a set that's proudly not timeless. Instead, it showcases a Sinatra on the rise, a singer relying on his inventive phrasing and incandescent charisma, elements that are undeniable and vital even when heard in these appealing old-fashioned surroundings. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

International Pop - Released May 18, 2018 | Profil

Booklet
Download not available
$18.99

International Pop - Released March 17, 2006 | WEA Latina

$25.49

International Pop - Released July 25, 2000 | RCA Records Label

$32.49

Crooners - Released October 25, 1993 | RCA Records Label

$15.49

International Pop - Released November 22, 2005 | Nonesuch

At the dawn of the 20th century, the record business did not yet exist, so songwriters relied exclusively on the sales of sheet music to make a living, hoping to come up with hits that everyone would want purchase to perform at home. This collection of 14 songs published between 1884 and 1909 became hits, though most of them are long forgotten in the 21st century except by those born prior to 1960 or so. The husband-and-wife team of William Bolcom and Joan Morris treat each of these songs with passion; the accomplished pianist's accompaniment of the rich-voiced mezzo-soprano brings out the best in each tune. Though some of the songs, such as the badly dated "After the Ball," haven't particularly stood the test of time, the gems by Harry Von Tilzer ("A Bird in a Gilded Cage" and "Wait 'Till the Sun Shines, Nellie"), Kerry Mills ("Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis"), and Ernest R. Ball's "Will You Love Me in December As You Do in May?" more than make up for the occasional museum piece. Morris' detailed liner notes and the inclusion of the complete lyrics to each song are an added bonus, and six previously unreleased tracks were added for the CD reissue. ~ Ken Dryden
$18.49

International Pop - Released October 30, 2015 | Springstoff

$15.49

International Pop - Released February 4, 2019 | Housemaster Records

$15.49

International Pop - Released July 25, 2018 | Housemaster Records

$15.49

International Pop - Released December 4, 2018 | Housemaster Records

International Pop - Released December 8, 2017 | Cappella Romana

Booklet
Download not available

International Pop - Released January 1, 1990 | Vox Box

Booklet
Download not available

International Pop - Released September 4, 2006 | WEA

Download not available
$19.49

International Pop - Released January 29, 2002 | Columbia

Although Barbra Streisand has recorded for the same company, Columbia Records, throughout her career, her work has not been particularly well represented on compilations. Four single-disc best-ofs dot her discography, but the listener who wanted to do something as simple as purchase an album containing the original studio recordings of both her first Top Ten hit, "People," and her first number one, "The Way We Were," without plumping for the four-CD box set Just for the Record , was out of luck. Complicating the compiling of her career highlights is her position as essentially an album artist, despite having scattered 11 Top Ten pop hits across 32 years. The ideal collection would have to do justice to her popular early albums of the '60s, her mid-career singles hits of the '70s, and her renewed album success in the '80s and '90s. Here it is. At a CD-busting length of over two and a half hours, this 40-track double-disc set encapsulates Streisand's recording career in chronological order from her 1963 debut album to 1999. (Two previously unreleased tracks sound like outtakes from her later album projects. "Someday My Prince Will Come" probably got left off of A Love Like Ours, while the gospel-tinged "You'll Never Walk Alone" must have been intended for Higher Ground.) Intelligently picking signature performances from her best and most popular albums, it largely eschews a raft of singles that got into the bottom half of the Top 40, but leaves out only one Top Ten hit, "What Kind of Fool." The singer's versatility and her ability to impose her immediately identifiable vocal style on a variety of material are emphasized in recordings that range from Broadway show tunes to disco. A collection like this has been needed for a long time as a gateway to Streisand's bountiful, indeed overwhelming, catalog. ~ William Ruhlmann
$19.49

International Pop - Released August 16, 2005 | RCA - Legacy

Harry Belafonte's influence on pop music is much more far reaching then many realize, as he was one of the first performers to bring worldbeat rhythms to the U.S. charts in the postwar era. Born in Harlem, but spending a good part of his childhood in his mother's native Jamaica, Belafonte grew up straddling cultures and musical styles, and bridging perceived differences became his calling card as an entertainer. His silky smooth mixture of jazz, folk, pop, and art song, often with impossibly infectious West Indies-styled accompaniment, coupled with his charismatic good looks and easy, hip coolness and sharp racial and political sense meant he was never reduced to being a mere commodity, even though he spent his whole career on major labels. This generous two-disc set (both discs track in at over 70 minutes) is the first affordable cross-label Belafonte collection to combine highlights from his stays at both the RCA and CBS labels, and the selections included here, spanning the years 1952 to 1977, were made by Belafonte himself. There's very little to quibble about (although one wonders about including a live version of his biggest hit, "Banana Boat Song (Day O)," instead of the original single version), and this thoughtfully sequenced set is easily the best introduction to the full range of his work currently on the market. Highlights are many, but include a 20-year-old Bob Dylan sitting in on harmonica for 1962's "Midnight Special," a defining version of Irving Burgie's gorgeous "Jamaica Farewell" from 1956, the adventurous worldbeat arrangement of "Turn the World Around" from 1977, an emotionally balanced rendition of Pete Seeger's haunting "Those Three Were on My Mind" from 1967, and an irresistible horn-led version of "Jump in the Line" from 1966's Calypso in Brass album. Belafonte's versatility may surprise some casual listeners who are only familiar with "Day O," and this set underscores his unique ability to find pop success with artful and socially committed material. Innovative, intelligent, and unceasingly creative, Belafonte is long overdue for a critical reappraisal. ~ Steve Leggett