Albums

International Pop - Released October 5, 2018 | Jube Pops

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International Pop - Released January 5, 2018 | Jube Legends

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Crooners - Released December 1, 2016 | Shami Media Group 3

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International Pop - Released August 26, 2016 | Columbia

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The follow-up to 2014's Partners, Barbra Streisand's 2016 studio effort, Encore: Movie Partners Sing Broadway, finds the acclaimed vocalist duetting with high-profile guest singers on a set of well-curated Broadway compositions. The difference this time out is that rather than simply singing the songs, wherever possible Streisand also includes the dialogue that frames the songs in their respective musical productions. The result is an album that straddles the line between a traditional pop album and musical theater recording. Helping to achieve this theatrical balance are Streisand's guests, all of whom can sing, but who, like Alec Baldwin, are primarily known as actors. On that score, Baldwin acquits himself nicely with his usual wry charm on the lightly swinging "The Best Thing That Ever Has Happened to Me" from Road Show. Not surprisingly, the more Broadway-experienced guests here, like Hugh Jackman on "Any Moment" from Smile and Patrick Wilson on "Loving You" from Passion, work both ends of the spectrum from acting to singing with seamless verve. Similarly effective are her duets with Family Guy creator turned classic crooner Seth MacFarlane on "Pure Imagination," and Melissa McCarthy on the buoyantly playful "Anything You Can Do," from Annie Get Your Gun. Particularly impressive is Star Trek's Chris Pine, whose nuanced baritone melds perfectly with Streisand on the yearning medley "I'll Be Seeing You/I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face," from Right This Way and My Fair Lady. It's also fun to hear Streisand play off more than one performer, as she does here with Anne Hathaway and Star Wars' Daisy Ridley on "At the Ballet," from A Chorus Line. Kudos also go to Streisand for choosing the late Anthony Newley for the digitally created duet on "Who Can I Turn To (When Nobody Needs Me)" from The Roar of the Greasepaint - The Smell of the Crowd. Much like her Elvis duet on Partners, her turn with the acclaimed British performer is a highly unexpected one and makes for a gloriously dramatic homage to Broadway in the '60s. ~ Matt Collar
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Crooners - Released February 4, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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International Pop - Released June 7, 2013 | Weird Music - Lounge

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Crooners - Released April 9, 2013 | Columbia - Legacy

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International Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal Music Philippines Inc.

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Crooners - Released October 26, 2010 | Columbia - Legacy

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International Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | Arista

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International Pop - Released January 14, 2003 | Columbia - Legacy

For those who like their romantic music with a healthy dose of kitsch and retro style, Ray Conniff's Love Songs fits the bill. The collection covers his adorably square work from the late '50s and early '60s through his more orchestrated and rock-influenced work from the late '60s and '70s, with "The Way You Look Tonight" defining the former and "You Light Up My Life" defining the latter. Though Conniff's heyday came relatively early in his career -- with songs like this collection's "I'm in the Mood for Love," "Memories are Made of This," and "It Had to Be You" representing that era -- the remainder of his work is as interesting, if not as successful, as what preceded it. The theatrical bent of his late-'60s-early-'70s material fits songs such as The Godfather's "Speak Softly Love," and Love Story's "Where Do I Begin," while his other work from that time experiments with exotic and foreign touches, as on "This is My Song," and Serge Gainsbourg's "Je T'Aime...Moi Non Plus (Love at First Sight)." Interestingly enough, the collection also reflects how pop music shifted away from a collection of standard songs with many possible interpretations to singer/songwriter-based music that, when covered, usually stayed close to the original version; the fat bass and electric pianos on the cover of Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are" nod to the original. While Love Songs doesn't contain enough of Conniff's essential music to make the collection work as a straightforward hits collection, it certainly captures the slightly dreamy, slightly playful feel that defined all of his material. Even if the lounge revival is no longer hip, Conniff's music is so well-produced and arranged that it still makes fun, surprisingly fresh-sounding mood music. ~ Heather Phares
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Crooners - Released January 10, 2003 | Columbia - Legacy

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Crooners - Released July 10, 2001 | RCA Records Label

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International Pop - Released January 11, 2000 | Columbia

Timeless: Live in Concert, recorded at her Las Vegas show on New Year's Eve 1999, takes as its subject the star herself. It opens with a dramatization of her first, amateur recording session, with young Lauren Frost playing a part described in the credits as "Young Girl," though Streisand later refers to her as "mini-me." Frost doesn't get too far before being joined by Streisand herself on a stirring version of "Something's Coming" from West Side Story. The rest of "Act One" traces Streisand's career from her club days to her movie performances. "Act Two" has less of a narrative structure, though it is equally autobiographical, with Streisand displaying and commenting on videos of herself performing with other stars and building up to the stroke of midnight with a combination of old, recent, and new specially written songs. At 57 that night, Streisand remains in good voice, and the old warhorses, among them inevitable hits like "People," "Evergreen," and "The Way We Were," sound, well, like they always do. More interesting are songs that, while previously recorded, have not been heard live before, especially "Alfie," which the singer confesses to having forgotten she ever did. But unless you are a big Streisand fan, you may want to stick to the studio albums on which she just sings. The extensive stage remarks here include comic interludes such as a dialogue with Shirley MacLaine and negative opinions about new technology, but for the most part they center on the singer herself. Timeless was issued a week before what were said to be her final concerts in September 2000. ~ William Ruhlmann
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International Pop - Released June 1, 1999 | Columbia - Legacy

Released as a celebration of Doris Day's three decades with Columbia Records, Golden Girl: Columbia Recordings 1944-1966 is a definitive portrait of Day at the peak of her career. Over the course of two discs and 48 songs, all of her big hits -- including "Sentimental Journey" and "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)" -- are featured, along with selected album tracks, duets, and five previously unreleased tracks. This may be a little too comprehensive for the average fan just looking for the hits, but for any serious fan, this is essential. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Crooners - Released September 29, 1997 | Columbia - Legacy

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Crooners - Released August 26, 1994 | RCA Bluebird

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International Pop - Released September 25, 1992 | Legacy - Columbia

16 Most Requested Songs contains some, but not all, of Doris Day's biggest hits. Consequently, it's more of a sampler for casual fans than a definitive retrospective, but it still highlights some of her very best performances, including "A Bushel and a Peck," "You Won't Be Satisfied," "Till the End of Time," "In Love in Vain," and "Black Hills of Dakota." ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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International Pop - Released September 23, 1991 | Arista

3 Stars - Good - "...the arrangements are top- dollar, and Manilow's strong, pliable voice rides the pit orchestra's pizzaz like a champion..."
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International Pop - Released September 3, 1991 | Legacy - Columbia

Her best hits, including the peppy "Buttons & Bows." ~ Bil Carpenter