Albums

$39.49

Techno - Released September 14, 2018 | Columbia

What a long way for the pioneer of French electronic music since his departure from the GRM of Pierre Schaeffer – the father of musique concrète et électroacoustique (concrete and electroacoustic music) – where he spent two years (from 1969 to 1971) that turned out to be decisive for the remainder of his career. After fifty years of introducing an entire generation to electronic music and becoming the most famous French artist outside of his borders, Jean-Michel Jarre is revisiting his abundant discography with this Planet Jarre compilation that gathers 41 tracks divided into four parts. The first album features, like its title Soundscapes suggests, musical landscapes, contemplative tracks bordering with ambient music, including the melancholic The Heart of Noise (The Origin) as well as two extracts from Oxygène 3 from 2016, Parts 19 and 20. On the second, named Themes, Jarre compiled his most “catchy” songs, produced for the most part in the seventies and eighties (except for Bells and Chronology, Pt. 4), with the famous Oxygène, Part. 4, the Moroderian Equinoxe Part 5, and the iconic Fourth Rendez-vous. The third record, Séquences, focuses on more “hypnotic” titles, like Arpegiateur from 1982 and the psytrance Exit, composed with Edward Snowden in 2016, as well as the dance-floor bomb Oxygène 8, from the 1997 album Oxygène 7-13. This Séquences is reinforced with two previously unreleased tracks, Herbalizer and Opening Coachella, recorded during the Frenchman’s performance at the prestigious Californian festival. Finally, disc number 4, Explorations & Early Works, might be the most interesting of the batch, first of all because it features two minutes of Music for Supermarkets, his single-copy album released in 1983. Worth noting is the nerve-shredding Roseland (Le Pays de rose) he wrote for the film The Burned Barns in 1973 (featuring Delon and Signoret), and most importantly La Cage, a track composed in 1969 at the GRM with a musical saw, a rattle, a wooden spoon and a synthesiser (with Erosmachine on the B side with spring noises). Two tracks from another world sold in only 117 copies (!) that help us truly grasp how far Jarre has come… © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
$24.49
$19.49

Techno - Released December 2, 2016 | Sony Music Catalog

Hi-Res
French electronic music innovator Jean Michel Jarre has revisited his signature work Oxygène numerous times throughout his career, through concerts, remixes, the 1997 sequel Oxygène 7-13, and a new master recording in 2007. A third volume was released in 2016, completing a 40-year trilogy, and all three albums were released as a box set. Taken as a whole, the project shows a remarkable consistency, exploring similar moods and themes even as technology drastically changes throughout the decades. The original Oxygène, of course, is the standard, and easily one of Jarre's best (which is not to discredit other spectacular albums such as Equinoxe). Playful, meditative, and slightly eerie, it's still a masterpiece. The second part, which is now renamed Oxygène 2, holds up surprisingly well. Using much of the same equipment, Jarre created another dazzling soundscape in the same style as the original. While this album is generally more uptempo, and there happens to be an increased presence of arpeggios common to trance music (which wouldn't have existed without the work of Jarre and his peers), it still seems like he was exploring his own mind rather than just trying to chase whatever was trendy at the time. Oxygène 3 has its trance-like moments but keeps with the spirit of the original (probably even more so than the second volume). It's rich and adventurous but it never goes over the top, which is a relief. All three albums are worthy on their own, but the entire trilogy is a fascinating multi-generational journey. ~ Paul Simpson

Techno - Released February 16, 2018 | Fabric Worldwide

Download not available
$1.49

Techno - Released March 16, 2018 | Kygo

$14.99
$9.99

Techno - Released May 12, 2017 | InFiné

Hi-Res Booklet
An untouchable. The status of Carl Craig , pioneer of Detroit Techno, is such that without him, countless electro tinkers would still be fooling around with their Playmobil to this day... the album that he offers here is a project all in its own right. Versus is in effect a kind of work in progress which subscribes to the philosophy of InFiné, an expert in stylistic hybridisation, and Planet E, the stable founded by Craig en 1991. It is also a kind of epilogue to a concert that the American played in 2008, at the Cité de la Musique, at which he was accompanied by the Les Siècles orchestra directed by François-Xavier Roth, Berlin electro producer Moritz Von Oswald and classical pianist (and electro musician) Francesco Tristano Schlimé. On the bill, City Life by Steve Reich, Streets by Bruno Mantovani and six pieces by Craig… Almost a decade later, Versus takes its inspiration from a this meeting of the genres. Here we find electronic miniatures plunged into the grandeur of symphonic music. Twelve of the fourteen pieces on the record are by Craig (mostly his great classics), with Tristano looking after the arrangements. The latter is also the writer of the other two pieces. Versus offers, above all, welcome and intelligently-composed and arranged performances which avoid the clichés that the marketing label " techno meets classical " could easily conjure up.. Inspiring and inspired. © MD/Qobuz
$17.49
$12.99

Techno - Released June 8, 2018 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet
$1.99
$1.49

Techno - Released October 27, 2017 | MER Recordings

Hi-Res
$17.49
$12.99

Techno - Released August 24, 2018 | Columbia

Hi-Res
The title gave us fair warning, but the world wasn't ready. In the year 2000, three years after he gave us a follow-up to his masterpiece Oxygène, Jean-Michel Jarre, now basking in the glory of a gigantic concert in Moscow's Red Square, brought out Métamorphose, which stunned fans because it contained vocals! The record opens with a collaboration with American singer Laurie Anderson, Je me souviens, over an Eighties electro instrumental, before Natacha Atlas comes in for the next piece. On C’est la vie, the diva of Transglobal Underground does what she does best, with her Near-Eastern vocal sallies, which producer Joachim Garraud, matches with percussion from the same climes, and trancey beats and keyboards with a slightly kitsch effect.   Next up, Rendez-vous à Paris, in the hypnotic voice of Jarre himself, filtered through a vocoder against a glitchy, aquatic background, and accompanied by the Irish violinist Sharon Corr of the Corrs; Bells, one of the only completely instrumental tracks, while Tout est bleu and its techno beat marks a little departure from good taste. Despite a fine cast list, the record, which would not win the expected commercial success, was simply not understood by Jean-Michel Jarre's hardcore fans. Twenty years on, perhaps they'll give it another chance. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz  
$2.99

Techno - Released December 2, 2016 | MER Recordings

$12.99

Techno - Released December 14, 2018 | MER Recordings

$12.99

Techno - Released August 24, 2018 | Columbia

Creating a legendary work is never straightforward, as many cinema fans have discovered the hard way. Jean-Michel Jarre didn't want the follow-up to his fabled album Oxygène to sound forced, so he imposed some technical restraints on himself as a kind of safeguard. Twenty years earlier, the French musician had left the Musical Research Group headed by Pierre Schaeffer. Seen at the time was as a group of idiots savant, it taught him how to grapple with analogue synthesisers. For Oxygene 7-13, which came out in 1997, Jarre decided to surround himself with these machines, which had propelled a whole generation into electronic music. The ARP 2600, the mellotron, the theremin and the famous TR-808 drum machine: they all contributed to the birth of techno and house.   Shut up for a whole year in his Bougival studio, Jean Michel Jarre sent himself on a journey to the centre of the Seventies, with experiments mirroring those of Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream. It's a stylistic exercise which cleaves successfully to introspection and homage (the record is dedicated to Pierre Schaeffer). Without knowing the dates, one could imagine that the two Oxygène albums were recorded back to back, between the opener Pt 7, which bears all the marks of the original Pt 8 with a little more trance, or the more dramatic, shadowy Pt 9, with its flights of synthetic strings – and which is in fact a torturous remix of Oxygène Pt 1 – which closes the circle beautifully. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
$1.99
$1.49

Techno - Released September 15, 2017 | MER Recordings

Hi-Res
$49.49
$39.49

Techno - Released September 14, 2018 | Columbia

Hi-Res
Planet Jarre is a compilation album commemorating 50 years of material from French electronic producer and composer Jean-Michel Jarre. Comprising thudding electro beats with atmospheric synth leads, the collection features two new tracks -- "Herbalizer" and "Coachella Opening" -- as well as classic compositions handpicked by Jarre himself. ~ Rob Wacey
$17.49
$12.99

Techno - Released August 24, 2018 | Columbia

Hi-Res
It was the early 2000 and downtempo and acid jazz were being smothered by the rise of French Touch house. But they found an escape route when lounge music flared into life, with its 90 BPM tempos, played at cool hangouts like the Mezzanine de l'Alcazar in Saint-Germain-des-Prés, the Buddha Bar or the Costes hotel, all of which have brought out compilations in their own names. Although the movement wasn't quite a musical revolution, radio programmers took advantage of it to soften their playlists, and lounge invaded the bars and restaurants of Paris (soon to be replaced by Deep House, which was then languishing in a very deep basement indeed). It was in this context that the VIP Room discos, led by Jean Roch, commissioned Jean-Michel Jarre to produce this album of lounge music, which originally ran to only 2,000 CDs, and which is a part of the salvo of re-releases that the star French publisher is putting out in 2018. For this stylistic exercise, Jarre gives us a 40-minute demonstration of his mastery of the genre's codes – something he's not always managed to do with other styles – and offers up eight tracks of sensuality (an aspect emphasised by the title and the sleeve image of the pixellated pubis of his then-girlfriend, Isabelle Adjani), with Geometry of Love pt 1 as the climax, and some mystical moments (the Minimoog on Soul Intrusion), and others that approach ambient (Skin Paradox). While the record only offers a patchy discography of Jarre, it is nonetheless of great interest for his hardest-core fans, and it is a worthy testament to a certain era. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
$5.49
$3.49

Techno - Released May 4, 2018 | InFiné

Hi-Res
30

Techno - Released March 31, 1997 | F Communications

Distinctions Victoire de la musique - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Download not available
30 is a seemingly effortless blend of classic Chicago jacking house with minimalistic acid funk and the occasional detour into trip-hop and ambient house. Enhanced by Laurent Garnier's longtime DJ work, the superb mix and feel for what should come next inform production skills to an incredible degree. The single "Crispy Bacon" is one of the seminal moments in the history of acid, while "Sweet Mellow D" and the mid-tempo "For Max" provide other highlights. The superb jacking theme "The Hoe" and "Flashback" (dedicated to the recently deceased Armando) are two of the more overtly Chicago-inspired tracks, but 30 is a stunning album throughout. ~ John Bush
$1.99
$1.49

Techno - Released June 8, 2018 | b1

Hi-Res
$17.49
$12.99

Techno - Released August 28, 2015 | Sony Music Catalog

Hi-Res
$8.99
$6.99

Techno - Released August 28, 2015 | Sony Music Catalog

Hi-Res
$12.99
La

Techno - Released June 29, 2018 | Arista France

Genre

Techno in the magazine
  • Mr Electro
    Mr Electro What a long way for the pioneer of French electronic music since his departure from the GRM of Pierre Schaeffer – the father of musique concrète et électroacoustique (concrete and electroacoustic m...