Albums

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Soul - To be released February 22, 2019 | Rhino

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Soul - Released February 8, 2019 | Acrobat

$31.99

Soul - Released December 14, 2018 | Motown

$31.99

Soul - Released June 15, 2018 | UNI - MOTOWN

Soul - Released March 30, 2018 | Linear Labs

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Soul - Released March 30, 2018 | Linear Labs

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Soul - Released March 30, 2018 | Linear Labs

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Adrian Younge conceived "Turn Down the Sound," one of the highlights from Venice Dawn's Something About April, as an imagined RZA-produced '60s Delfonics cut. Shortly after the release of that cinematic, psychedelic soul masterpiece, a fan put Younge in touch with the Delfonics' William Hart. The meeting led to this, the best Delfonics album since 1970. It follows four decades of sporadic new recordings, scads of dodgy re-recordings, and multiple performing versions of the group. Hart is the lone Delfonic here, but he has been a driving creative force and lead voice since its inception. The lyrics for eight of the songs were written by him alone. The remainder was composed with Younge, who arranged and produced and handled the majority of the instrumentation -- including but not limited to the bass, drums, electric guitar, electric sitar, vibraphones, glockenspiel, timpani, cello, Fender Rhodes, and his own Mellotron-like Selene -- with some support from Venice Dawn. That includes the softly sighing Saudia Mills (the cover star) and the gutsy yet refined Loren Oden (who shares the lead on "To Be Your One") in background vocalist roles. Those who know Something About April won't be taken aback by the halting sound and high quality of this set. While neither as dark nor as wild, Adrian Younge Presents the Delfonics still has some of that spookiness, evoking late-'60s sweet soul -- and, on "I Can't Cry No More," mid-'50s doo wop -- with a European film composer's knack for soul-inspired suspense and an emphasis on deeply resonant drum breaks ripe for sampling. Considering that Hart is approaching his 70th year, it's remarkable that his falsetto remains so powerful and penetratingly bittersweet. The lyrics are expressed with a degree of relatable passion and dejection that is rare among singers less than half Hart's age. Beside Younge, he has reinvented the Delfonics in a way that can reach across generations. Word to City of Carson bail bondsman Max Cherry. ~ Andy Kellman
$64.49

Soul - Released May 31, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

$50.99

Soul - Released November 10, 2017 | Stax

Booklet
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Soul - Released September 21, 2017 | South London Recordings

$29.49

Soul - Released January 1, 2005 | Motown

Throughout her career, Brenda Holloway regrettably lived in the shadow of several Motown divas who garnered more of the spotlight than she did (sometimes quite unfairly). This is one of several artistic tragedies in the Motown catalog; a story of talent that rang fresh and potent but never really received due diligence for one reason or another. Thankfully, Motown is slowly correcting these facts and giving several artists their moment in the sun with well-packaged, comprehensive anthologies highlighting the artist's best-known works along with a generous portion of outtakes. Holloway's Motown Anthology is no exception. The first disc features the two full-length records she recorded for Motown: Every Little Bit Hurts and Hurtin' and Cryin', the majority of which was previously unreleased to the public. Every single hit Holloway had is included here, making this a must-have for Motown enthusiasts, Northern Soul aficionados, and fans of stunning, timeless soul music. The second disc offers a generous helping of rare singles and previously unreleased material, featuring an outstanding rendition of "All I Do Is Think About You," an intense interpretation of "He's My Kind of Fellow" (made known by Gladys Knight & the Pips), and the stomper "I'm on the Right Track." It's a shame material of this quality and caliber had to linger and gather dust in the Motown archives for so long, as Holloway -- on her worst day -- sounds better than most do on their best days, but this collection was definitely worth the wait. It's an immense joy to listen to, start to finish. Kudos to Motown U.K. for having the initiative to finally make these treasures available for all to hear. ~ Rob Theakston
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Soul - Released July 1, 2017 | Soundstarrecords

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Soul - Released April 15, 2017 | Fantasy Label

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Soul - Released March 31, 2017 | 100% Records

Stone Foundation return with their fourth record of soul-inspired music with a distinctly British sound. Former Jam frontman Paul Weller produced Street Rituals, in addition to contributing guitar, piano, and vocals to many of the tracks. The record also features contributions from legendary soul singers William Bell and Bettye LaVette. ~ Bekki Bemrose
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Soul - Released August 1, 2010 | UNI - MOTOWN

$20.49

Soul - Released October 15, 2007 | UNI - MOTOWN

Soul - Released September 20, 2016 | Ideal Music

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$50.99

Soul - Released April 29, 2016 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Soul - Released April 22, 2016 | Rhino Atlantic

Born and raised in Florida, soul chanteuse Jackie Moore pulled up stakes and made her way to Philadelphia to launch a career in music when she was just 18 years old. Moore was certain that big things were going to happen on the Philly soul scene, and she was right, but by the time she finally connected with producers and a label that knew what to do with her tough but soaring vocal style, they ended up sending her back to Florida, where she cut her first and biggest hit, "Precious, Precious," at Miami's Criteria Studios. Sounding a bit like Aretha Franklin but with a more defiantly Southern edge and an understated but powerful dramatic flair, Moore recorded plenty of memorable sides for Atlantic during her five-year run with the label, but some of her best work for the legendary soul imprint never saw release, and 1973's "Sweet Charlie Babe" was the last time Moore broke into the Hot 100 singles chart (though she fared well on the Dance charts during the disco era). Real Gone has finally given soul fans and Jackie Moore collectors a chance to hear the singer's previously lost Atlantic sessions on the two-disc set The Complete Atlantic Recordings, which features 14 previously unreleased tracks along with two tunes that received a belated release on soul rarities collections, and another 14 that either popped up on singles or her sole Atlantic LP, Sweet Charlie Babe. The churchy fervor of Moore's voice shines bright on nearly every track here, and the production (most either from her cousin Dave Crawford or the Philly studio team the Young Professionals) generally works to her advantage. And while "Precious, Precious," "Sometimes It's Got to Rain (In Your Love Life)," and "Sweet Charlie Babe" were R&B hits for all the right reasons, "If This Was the Last Song," "Tell Me a Lie," and "Set Me Free" show that Atlantic's A&R staff didn't truly know what they had, as they and several other unheard tracks on this set sound like potential classics that got away. Despite her only-intermittent success on the charts, Jackie Moore clearly had the talent to be a major star, and The Complete Atlantic Recordings finally gives this underrated diva her due. ~ Mark Deming

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Soul in the magazine