Albums

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R&B - Released November 25, 2016 | Universal Republic Records

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R&B - Released March 30, 2018 | Universal Republic Records

The Weeknd is going back to his roots on this surprise album (or half album) that he has gifted the world. After a collaborative album with Daft Punk (Starboy), which shot him to international stardom and also brought him a Grammy, the R&B singer from “The 6” (Toronto Metropolitan Area) has shifted back to a more personal effort. Abel Tesfaye, or alias The Weeknd co-writes 6 deeply personal tracks that focus on love, drugs and sex, the perfect formula for an R&B album. He opens up more than ever about his current trials and tribulations with relationships, but his pain is our gain. The 21 minutes of music is vintage The Weeknd from his album Trilogy, deeply chilling with distressed synths and spacey falsetto vocals. OG fans of The Weeknd will love this record, while it will still create many new ones.
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R&B - Released April 6, 2018 | Virgin EMI

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Since 2012, Karly-Marina Loaiza alias Kali Uchis has stacked up a collection of "feat.s" to rival the rack of medals across a Soviet general's chest. And so the first album from the Colombian-American, whose voice has featured on tracks by Snoop Dogg, Tyler The Creator, GoldLink, Major Lazer, Kaytranada, Miguel, Vince Staples and Gorillaz was well overdue. Before this release, Kali Uchis had already managed to make plain her strong personality, and her status as another potential new queen of R&B and soul. Wait, another? No, no no. A real queen, single and sovereign, with a voice that mixes neo soul, 90s R&B, early-Madonna-era pop and wit à la Amy Winehouse. Her voice enjoys a five-star setting on this first album, where such stars as Tyler et Damon Albarn rub shoulders, but also the Canadians of BadBadNotGood, Kevin Parker of Tame Impala, David Sitek of TV On The Radio, live wire Thundercat, soul star Jorja Smith, the Dap-Kings, The Internet's Steve Lacey, his compatriot Reykon and legendary funkster Bootsy Collins. On Isolation, the Los Angeles-based singer brings her Latin roots to bear by singing in two languages, slaloming between neo soul, R&B, hip-hop, Latin pop and reggaeton. Through languorous sequences and up-tempo pieces, Uchis shines in all contexts, against all backdrops, to create a record of stunning freshness, never gaudy or mawkish. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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R&B - Released May 20, 2008 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B - Released July 30, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Even geniuses (maybe especially geniuses) are taken for granted, not seen as geniuses, or only appreciated in small doses. Which is a grandiose way of saying that, no matter how partisans may complain, there are many listeners out there that don't want to delve into the deliriously rich catalog of Prince and would rather spend time with a single disc of all the hits -- especially since the first singles compilation was botched, spread too thin over two discs and sequenced as if it were on shuffle play. That doesn't mean that 2001's The Very Best of Prince is perfect, even if it is a better hits overview than its predecessor. First of all, Prince had so many hits, and so many of them were so good, that 17 tracks couldn't possibly summarize everything great. After all, this doesn't have Top Ten hits like "Delirious," "Pop Life," "I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man," or "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" (or the number one "Batdance," for that matter, continuing Batman being unofficially written out of his discography), nor does it have such great second-tier hits as "Take Me With U" and "Mountains," or B-sides like "Irresistible Bitch" and "Erotic City," let alone album tracks. What is here are the big songs -- "1999," "Little Red Corvette," "When Doves Cry," "Kiss," and so on -- all presented in their single edits. And, frankly, that's enough to make this a dynamite collection, perfect for those that just want one Prince disc, and a good, solid listen of some of his best. Besides, this trumps both Hits discs by including "Money Don't Matter 2 Night," his best single never to reach the Top 10. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B - Released August 28, 2015 | Universal Republic Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Grammy Awards
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R&B - Released November 2, 2018 | UMGRI Interscope

U.K. singer Jacob Banks took a long, slow road to his debut studio album Village, first releasing his genre-bending take on blues-indebted R&B on a 2013 EP and trickling out tracks and brief collections from there. While colorful and shifting styles have always been a part of Banks' music, Village offers the highest-definition presentation of his many approaches, as he plays with sonic switch-ups and wandering moods across the 15 spacious tracks. The album starts with the bombastic single "Chainsmoking," where Banks' baritone guides the aching song through a mesh of rocked-out blues and dubstep bass. This pastiche approach comes up a lot on Village, with several songs flitting between different musical modes and sometimes turning on a dime. "Love Ain't Enough" is perhaps the most intense example of this nervous genre switching, as Banks begins the tune as a bass-heavy blues-pop lament and ends it as a full-on ragga drum'n'bass, complete with breakbeat samples and dubbed-out deejay toasting. Moments of neo-soul, tropical pop, and dubstep show up from moment to moment and "Keeps Me Going" ties pop production to Nigerian rhythms, as Banks reflects on his early life there. When he stays on one page long enough, the results can be powerful. The dark and dramatic ballad "Unknown (To You)" would sound at home in a post-break-up montage of any big-romantic comedy, boiling heartbreak down into something accessible and immediate. The more subdued "Slow Up" reads like a letter from Banks to his younger self, hoping to impart everything he's learned over a beautifully atmospheric track. For all its strengths, Village is inconsistent and the songs often seem to be aiming for sentiments they don't quite reach. Overloaded with ideas, several songs on the second half could have been left off the album and resulted in a bolder whole. Though Banks never drowns under his own ambition on Village, the album struggles with focus. Inspired songs compete with lesser tracks in almost equal numbers, giving the album more of a mixtape feel than the statement it could have made with more fastidious editing. ~ Fred Thomas
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R&B - Released March 29, 2013 | Parkwood Entertainment - Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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R&B - Released May 22, 1980 | UNI - MOTOWN

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R&B - Released March 3, 2017 | Right Hand Music Group, LLC - RCA Records

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Khalid Robinson made major commercial headway in early 2017 with "Location," a drowsy, teetering ballad the singer and songwriter seemed to deliver while lying on his bed, or maybe someone else's couch, eyes glued to his phone, just after waking up. In that song, and through much of what fills out American Teen, his debut album, Robinson's not one to get worked up. He's in no particular rush, content to drift through life while accepting, and occasionally sort of celebrating, the present. "American Teen" itself -- hollowed-out late-'80s mall pop with a disco-funk bassline -- is a youth anthem of shrugging aimlessness. There's not a whole lot of enthusiasm for revelry, dulled by substances, apathy, a combination of the two, or just the aspiration to look the part: "I'm so faded off of all the things I've taken, and maybe I'm not really drunk, maybe I'm really good at faking." There are points at which Robinson makes Frank Ocean sound like Teddy Pendergrass. On "Young Dumb & Broke," the mere concept of commitment seems so silly to him that he can't be bothered to enunciate the word, or maybe he just lost interest after the second syllable. After a nonchalant chorus that consists primarily of the song's title and a lethargic warble -- surprise -- he dumps one of his best melodies in the bridge. While he opens "Another Sad Love Song" by confessing "I'm not the best at showing my emotions," some bright moments make it apparent that Robinson has clearly sold himself short. Dusty ballad "Cold Blooded," in particular, demonstrates that he's perfectly capable of conveying grief without being overly demonstrative. When alert, he can be a force. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released June 5, 2001 | J Records - Legacy

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R&B - Released April 6, 2018 | Rec. 118

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R&B - Released October 11, 2005 | J Records

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R&B - Released June 9, 2017 | Top Dawg Entertainment - RCA Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
If Kendrick Lamar, Travis Scott, James Fauntleroy and Isaiah Rashad all crop up on a debut album, it is surely at least worth a listen. Especially if it has been brought out by Top Dawg Entertainment... This record from Solána Row aka SZA has been eagerly-awaited. Signed to TDA for some years, the most exciting R&B singer in the rap'n'soul world today has released a pretty-much-perfect studio album. Alternating between a sensual languor and grooves that float on air, CTRL also possesses an addictive freshness. A real revelation. © MD/Qobuz
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R&B - Released March 25, 1986 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B - Released March 23, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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Is this Toni Braxton's revenge? At 50 years of age, the 1990s R&B star (with more than 25 million sales of her first two albums, the self-titled Toni Braxton in 1993 and Secrets in 1996) is bringing back fond memories for aficionados of sugary, languorous groove, with a rather sober album, lovingly made, and which never falls into either over-exuberance or self-parody. Above all, this is a work for its times (2018) and it has taken a few steps away from the sounds of the 1990s. Braxton is now a mature woman, facing both her present and her past head-on. Four years after Love, Marriage & Divorce, a duo with Babyface, Sex & Cigarettes marks a return to serious business. For her first album since 2010's Pulse, she has brought even more to the table than usual. "“I feel like I’m older, I wanna say what I feel. I don’t wanna be censored.” The message is loud and clear (just take a look at the lyrics on adultery) and it shows that Toni Braxton is far from finished… © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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R&B - Released September 14, 2018 | LVRN Records

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East Atlanta Love Letter is the sophomore album from American rapper 6LACK and follows his 2016 debut, FREE 6LACK. The deftly produced album, featuring minimal beats and rhythms, sees 6LACK lyrically influenced by his role as a father, juggling fame and the trappings that come with it. Guest spots come from the likes of Ty Dolla $ign, Offset, J. Cole, and Khalid. Upon release, the album debuted at number three on the Billboard 200. ~ Rich Wilson
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R&B - Released March 3, 2017 | Sony Music UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Ayo

R&B - Released October 6, 2017 | AYO

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R&B - Released August 30, 2013 | G.O.O.D. Music - Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio

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R&B in the magazine
  • The Carters are untouchable
    The Carters are untouchable The ultimate luxury for the biggest stars is to be able to randomly release an album without warning. Although much anticipated ever since their first collaboration in 2002, Jay-Z and Beyoncé’s com...
  • TLC, back to the 90’s
    TLC, back to the 90’s T-Boz and Chilli revive the flame of their vintage R&B ...