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Quartets - Released January 5, 2018 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Quartets - Released November 3, 2017 | CPO

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Quartets - Released November 3, 2017 | Stradivarius

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Quartets - Released September 24, 2017 | Rattle

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Quartets - Released September 29, 2017 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This 2017 release by Austria's Quatuor Mosaïques is actually the second in a series; the first box, covering Beethoven's early quartets, appeared in 1994. Whether they thought about the difficult late quartets for 23 years or other projects simply intervened, this volume has been worth the wait. (The middle quartets are apparently still to come.) As before, the Quatuor Mosaïques uses gut strings and historically authentic bows, as well as a tuning slightly below the usual A=440. There are few recordings of Beethoven's quartets made on instruments with aspects of historical construction (not really "historical instruments," for plenty of players use old instruments), and the result is immediately distinctive. The level of vibrato is low, but not outlandishly so. Instead, the most unusual aspect of the performances are their fluidity and grace, made possible by the gentle sound of the strings and by bows that do not dig into the attacks the way modern ones do. Beethoven's quartets are known for their extremity: the almost unplayable Grosse Fuge, Op. 133 (which here is made quite a bit more manageable by the historical bows), the vast and almost unthinkable modal slow movement of the String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op. 132, the bizarrely humorous String Quartet No. 16 in F major, Op. 135. Yet such extremity is balanced by passages of great simplicity: Beethoven offers a plethora of straightforward, hummable, folkish tunes, of which the most famous one is not in a quartet but in the finale of the Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125. Here, note the effect that the Quatuor Mosaïques' light touch has on the seven-movement String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 131, which loses its ponderous qualities and emerges as a kind of suite. The group takes its tempos on the fast side in the main, and in a few places they seem to skate over the surface of the music rather than plumbing its great depths. But in the Grosse Fuge and the Op. 132 slow movement they are very strong. Recommended, and beautifully recorded.
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Quartets - Released September 22, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Quartets - Released September 8, 2017 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
It’s in a small comic filled with self-derision that the Modigliani Quartet describe their background, from the founding of the quartet in 2003 to its beginnings at the Berliner Philharmonie in 2017: First Prize Winners of the Young Concert Artists in New York, which opened the doors of the Carnegie Hall to them in 2006, Grand Prix Winners of Académie Charles Cros two years later with Haydn, artistic directors of the Evian Festival in 2014… An impressive and international pedigree for this quartet originally founded by four students of the Conservatoire de Paris keen to try their hands on the greatest chamber music repertoire. This new recording of the sole three quartets of Schumann, works created in one go in 1842 – two years after 1840, “the year of the Lied”, and one year before the two chamber masterpieces that are the Piano Quartet and the Piano Quintet. It’s true that in these quartets, Schumann doesn’t stray too far from Beethoven and even less from Mendelssohn (posthumously dedicatee), maybe the consequence of an inevitably more linear and contrapuntal writing, not as harmonic as the addition of a piano would allow. The fact remains that the Modiglianis capture these three singular works and restore their lines rather than looking for a dense, symphonic and pianistic texture that is not theirs. © SM/Qobuz
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Quartets - Released September 1, 2017 | naïve classique

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Quartets - Released March 17, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Quartets - Released March 10, 2017 | Berlin Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Quartets - Released February 24, 2017 | RCA Red Seal

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Quartets - Released February 17, 2017 | SOMM Recordings

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica

Quartets - Released January 9, 2017 | SMOOTH CLASSICAL

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Quartets - Released November 18, 2016 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Quartets - Released October 28, 2016 | SOMM Recordings

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
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Quartets - Released February 26, 2016 | naïve classique

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Quartets - Released March 16, 2009 | Naive

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Quartets - Released July 1, 2016 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Shortly after he arrived in Vienna in 1782, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart began composing his six "Haydn" Quartets, inspired by recent contact with his new friend, Franz Joseph Haydn. Not only had Haydn composed an important set of string quartets in 1781, which Mozart studied closely, he also played violin in a quartet with Mozart as violist. These influences led Mozart to compose his String Quartet No. 16 in E flat major, K. 428, and his String Quartet No. 19 in C major, K. 465, "Dissonant," which bookend the Divertimento in D major, K. 136, on this 2016 release from Alpha Classics. The Quatuor Van Kuijk, a French string quartet in spite of its Dutch name, deliver exciting and engaging performances of the string quartets, finding the right blend of flashiness and warmth that characterize Mozart's newfound maturity. Yet the youthful Divertimento is treated with comparable brilliance, if slightly less ardor, and all three works make a delightful program, showing important aspects of the development of the Classical style. The recordings are focused and detailed, though the acoustics of Queen Elisabeth Music Chapel in Waterloo create an aural halo that at times softens the Quatuor Van Kuijk's edge.