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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released November 23, 2018 | Anima Nostra

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released November 2, 2018 | Ghostlight Records

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released September 14, 2018 | Ad Vitam records

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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released July 20, 2018 | SOMM Recordings

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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released May 11, 2018 | Navona

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released March 2, 2018 | Glossa

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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With "Siface: l’amor castrato", countertenor Filippo Mineccia, together with Javier Ulises Illán and Nereydas, presents a short imaginary pasticcio opera reflecting the music-making and life of the contralto castrato known by that stage name. Born Giovanni Francesco Grossi in 1653 in the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, Siface was acclaimed for his exciting musical performances, yet who became famous also for the tragedy of his love life. He was called upon to sing in operas and oratorios by the likes of Stradella, Pasquini, Bassani, Pallavicino and Agostini. For a long time in the service of Francesco II d’Este in Modena, Siface was an active member of the musical “ducal circuit” in the Italian peninsula, even, on one occasion, additionally being sent to England, where he performed before monarchy, and met and impressed Henry Purcell. Filippo Mineccia brilliantly captures the kaleidoscopic rush of emotions coursing through this selection of arias, which reflects the torrid and spectacular musical pace of life in late seventeenth-century Italy (as well as mirroring Siface’s own downfall on the road from Ferrara to Bologna). The Spanish ensemble Nereydas fully enter into the spirit of this, by turns, colourful, heartfelt, poignant and vivid celebration of vocal and instrumental music, which also features works by Alessandro Scarlatti (the emotive lullaby Dormi o fulmine), Francesco Cavalli and Purcell (My song shall be alway). Elena Bernardi puts flesh on still little understood aspects of the early stages of opera in the late Seicento., © Glossa

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released February 16, 2018 | Dacapo

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No relation between Niels Gade's Erlenkönig and the Erl-King that was ballad-ified by Goethe and set to music by Schubert. The original Danish, in fact, is Elverskud, or in other words elfin shot (from a rifle, a musket, or whatever) but the closeness of the words means that the translation put down as Erle [or alder] which should in fact have been elf – presumably the celebrity gloss provided by Goethe and Schubert was the cause of the spot of sleight of hand that saw it confounded with the better-known German version. So Niels Gade's work is really called Elverskud, initially translated into German as Erlkönigs Tochter, and the hero of this "ballad based on three Danish folk tales" has nothing to do with any alders at all. The plot? Sir Oluf has been seduced by lady elves. He was set to wed - not with an elfin lady, of course - but things took a turn for the worse when Oluf, to his mother's astonishment, took off on horseback in the middle of the night. He explains that his heart is torn in two between his beautiful fiancée - blonde with blue eyes - and the daughter of the elfin King - with black locks and a smouldering glance. Despite his mother's entreaties, Oluf heads for the dark and dangerous forest where he finds the elfin daughters. The daughter of the King of the elves demands that he stays; he refuses; she curses him; he manages to get away and returns home. But when he arrives, he is met by Death himself... Finalé: the choir sings a short moral which enjoins the audience never to tarry with elves and certainly never to go into their hilltop kingdoms. Gade's sumptuous, very romantic work, completed in 1854, is presented as a kind of great cantata, originally written in Danish, but whose German translation – Erlkönigs Tochter – was published in 1855 and widely distributed across Europe, before conquering North America, Russia, and even Australia! Ten years later, Gade gave his score a very serious makeover: instrumentation, the shape of several passages, and it is this definitive version - moreover the only version which would be conducted by the composer himself - which is recorded here, a discographical world first. © SM/Qobuz

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released August 11, 2017 | Naxos

Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released February 10, 2017 | Alpha

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released March 4, 2016 | Fuga Libera

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 13, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released June 18, 2014 | Outhere

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released September 24, 2013 | Delos

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released May 15, 2012 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Hi-Res Audio
Tenor Mark Padmore has an ideal voice for these two Britten song cycles written for Peter Pears. He has the kind of musical sensitivity and attentiveness to textual subtleties that characterized Pears' singing. His voice is essentially light in the way that Pears' was, but his is infinitely more attractive. Its tone is clear and pure, with none of Pears' nasal quality, and can be sweet without sounding precious. Padmore's technique seems absolutely secure and while his instrument is not large, he can produce an impressive range of dynamics. He and horn player Stephen Bell deliver a terrific performance of the Serenade for tenor, horn, and strings, and Jacqueline Shave's leadership of the Britten Sinfonietta is energetic and nuanced. Padmore's phrasing is shapely and expressive and he can spin out the seamless legato most of these songs require. In "Hymn," he and Bell sing and play with nimble fleetness that seems thrillingly close to the edge of spinning out of control but that ultimately lands safely. The performance of "Dirge" is charged with darker-than-usual sinister energy; the running string figures that follow the canon seem here more like a demonic dance than a dirge, to wonderful, scary effect. There is no lack of topnotch recordings of the Serenade, but this is a version that anyone who loves the piece will want to hear. In Nocturne, Padmore again excels in bringing intelligent and sensitive, sometimes soaring musicality to the songs. Finzi's cycle Dies Natalis is something of a novelty, but it fits well with the Britten. His harmonic language is eloquently post-Romantic, solidly in the English pastoral tradition, and his text setting relatively conventional, but the cycle is a lovely, lyrical, entirely successful exemplar of that tradition. Serenade, written about five years after Dies Natalis, demonstrates by contrast the daring individuality of Britten's handling of texts and the rich originality of his melodic gift. The sound of Harmonia Mundi's SACD is immaculate and detailed, with a gripping sense of presence.
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released November 8, 2011 | harmonia mundi

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released July 1, 2011 | Carpe Diem (Sweden)

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released April 14, 2011 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Music by vocal ensembles - Released September 23, 2010 | Mirare

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released April 28, 2009 | Da Capo

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