Albums

$32.99

Symphonic Music - Released January 12, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica
These are the recordings of Mozart created by Ferenc Fricsay at the head of the Berlin RIAS orchestra, now known at the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, of which he was the musical director from 1948 to 1954, and then from 1959 to his premature death in 1963. More precisely, these recordings date from 1951 and 1952, still in mono (high-fidelity music lovers take note); the majority having been recorded in the studio, the last few in concert. They cover almost all the symphonies of Mozart's youth, from No. 1 to No. 9, and No. 23 and No. 27; as well as a number of serenades and cassations, and some rather less-usual concertos - the Concerto for bassoon, and the Sinfonia Concertante for Four Winds – and an air from the Noces with Suzanne Danco as well as a duet from Don Giovanni with Danco and Rita Streich. The impeccable sound recording by Radio Berlin, even in mono, attests to the immense musical talent and vitality of the conductor, a student of Bartók (whom he would always faithfully champion) and Kodály, who disappeared at the unreasonably-young age of 48. © SM/Qobuz
$13.49
$8.99

Symphonic Music - Released December 1, 2017 | Evidence

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica
$20.99
$17.99

Symphonic Music - Released October 27, 2017 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Don't be fooled by the album cover: the music recorded here is NOT Maderna, but Frescobaldi, Gabrieli and a few other composers from the same era, only orchestrated by Maderna. Among these late Renaissance and baroque works, as re-written, can be found, as a kind of pillar whose meaning in the album rather defies comprehension, the Sequenza XII by Berio which was initially conceived for a guitar solo and transcribed by the composer for guitar and chamber orchestra under the name of Chemins V. The whole work is about orchestrations, re-editions, translations from other eras. When it comes to Maderna and other old composers, the interest is neither musicological nor historical, as the orchestrations were done in the 20th Century, with 20th-Century orchestral techniques. Maderna's work, dating from the 1950s to the 1970s, bears witness to the widespread interest in masters from the past, with new editions, exhumations, rediscoveries; and Monteverdi was played without overmuch concern for period instruments - even if Hindemith, for example, tried to perform L’Orfeo with what old instruments he was able to gather... Seen from this point of view, the Maderna orchestrations are almost recompositions, although without ever betraying or travestying the manuscript, as Stravinsky did with Pergolese: it sticks, for example, to a "baroque" orchestra from our times, without instruments which did not exist at the time. A truly interesting recording. © SM/Qobuz
$14.99
$12.99

Symphonies - Released September 29, 2017 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Gustav Mahler and the Munich Philharmonic share a very special connection. As a composer he sustainably linked the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. The world premiere of his Symphony No. 4 took place under his baton on 25 November 1901 in Munich’s Großen Kaim-Saal with the then called Kaim-Orchester, present day Munich Philharmonic. His works have been a substantial part of the Munich Philharmonic’s core repertoire ever since and the orchestra has excelled on many occasions. After the MPHIL release of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 in September 2016 now follows the release of the Symphony No. 4 with which the orchestra’s history is so closely intertwined. The live concert recording released on this album took place at the Philharmonie im Gasteig in Munich, the orchestra’s home, with Salzburg soprano Genia Kuehmeier. Valery Gergiev has paid the Austro-German repertoire particular attention throughout his career, which ignited a lasting fascination for Gustav Mahler. Over recent decades he has continued to explore the Austro-German repertoire, garnering adulation, especially for his interpretations of Wagner, Strauss, Mahler and Bruckner – music that is at the very heart of the Munich Philharmonic’s repertoire. © Warner Classics

Symphonic Music - Released September 8, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available

Symphonic Music - Released May 19, 2017 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available
The BBC Philharmonic has launched a highly interesting new series dedicated to George Antheil’s symphonic works, the totally underrated music of a composer who began his career with a reputation as an enfant terrible during his formative years in Europe, where he composed a succession of shockingly avant-garde works, including Ballet mécanique in 1925. In this and his other early modernist pieces, the self-styled “Bad Boy of Music” was heavily influenced by the rhythmic dynamism and crushing dissonances of Stravinsky’s early ballets, but his stylistic preoccupations would change markedly after his return to the USA in 1933. He moved towards a fundamentally tonal and melody-based style, surprising those who knew his earlier experimental music by now joining the growing ranks of US symphonists working in tuneful neo-classical and neo-romantic idioms. Antheil considered his Symphony No. 4, begun in 1942, to be a meditation on several aspects of the ongoing war: the massacre in Lidice for the second movement, while the third, a Scherzo, was “a brutal joke, the joke of war”. The Allies’ eventual triumph was adumbrated in the symphony’s dynamic finale. The work was a tremendous success with both critics and concert-goers, and Time magazine felt that the premiere was an “almost unprecedented” phenomenon: a new American symphony which “failed to bore its audience”. The Time reviewer, however, suggested strong influence of Shostakovich; particularly obvious were the apparent nods towards the Russian composer’s bombastic “Leningrad” Symphony (No. 7), first heard in the United States in July 1942. Antheil resented this implication, however, writing in his autobiography that the passage in the middle of his first movement which had most frequently been attributed to his fondness for Shostakovich had in fact been recycled note-for-note from his own opera Transatlantic published as early as 1928 (the reader can readily check that here, track 20). As Antheil was quick to point out, this music therefore had originated during a time just somewhat before Shostakovich had written even one symphony. In 1947, Antheil put the score of a new but unfinished Fifth symphony aside (the work would become the unnumbered tragic Symphony) and devoted himself instead to a completely different Symphony No. 5; this new work would have a far more celebratory nature, as its sobriquet, “Joyous”, unashamedly indicated. Antheil regarded the symphony as marking his final break from what he called “the now passé” musical modernism of the early twentieth century. In his review of the Carnegie Hall performance, music critic Virgil Thomson declared Symphony No. 5 to be Antheil’s best work to date. The album begins with the short Over the Plains (1945, here a world premiere recording), recalling the emotions that he had experienced when travelling through Texas ten years before, on which occasion he knew that one day he would write a piece celebrating not only the optimistic, pioneering spirit that the view had inspired but also the cheerfulness of the local inhabitants. © SM/Qobuz

Symphonic Music - Released May 5, 2017 | PentaTone

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica - Exceptional sound
Download not available

Symphonic Music - Released May 5, 2017 | PentaTone

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available
$13.49
$8.99

Symphonic Music - Released March 24, 2017 | Phi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
$15.49
$10.99

Ballets - Released March 17, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica

Symphonies - Released March 3, 2017 | BIS

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available

Symphonies - Released March 3, 2017 | PentaTone

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available
Mendelssohn’s warmly lyrical and evocative Scottish symphony is paired with his confident and precocious first symphony for the first in a series of recordings in multi-channel surround sound for PENTATONE by the conductor Andrew Manze and the NDR Radiophilharmonie. It’s no wonder that Robert Schumann dubbed Mendelssohn the “Mozart of the nineteenth century”; with his felicitous gift for melody and meticulous craftsmanship, his music positively brims with youthful spontaneity and exuberance, blending dreamy poetic flights with moments of affecting tenderness and serenity. Inspired by his visits to Scotland and the Hebrides and the romantic novels of Sir Walter Scott, his outstanding Symphony No. 3 in A minor (“Scottish”) is a colourful reminiscence of its rugged landscapes steeped in history, and an affectionate homage to the proud Highlanders he met there. It was an instant success on its first performance and rivals the popularity of the overture The Hebrides, also inspired by the splendour of Scotland. No less impressive is his masterly Symphony No. 1 in C minor, composed when he was just 15 years old. From its noisy and impetuous opening to its triumphant conclusion, this confident and adventurous work shows the influence of Mozart, Haydn and Weber but the effect is unmistakeably Mendelssohnian with fugal passages, unforgettable melodies and busy, inventive scoring. (Text from the Pentatone website)
$19.49

Symphonies - Released January 20, 2017 | Sony Classical

Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
$14.99
$9.99

Symphonic Music - Released November 8, 2016 | NoMadMusic

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica

Symphonic Music - Released August 12, 2016 | Seattle Symphony Media

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available

Symphonic Music - Released June 10, 2016 | Oehms Classics

Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available

Symphonies - Released June 10, 2016 | Dacapo SACD

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Download not available

Symphonic Music - Released June 3, 2016 | BIS

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available

Symphonic Music - Released April 1, 2016 | BR-Klassik

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available

Symphonies - Released February 5, 2016 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
Download not available