Albums

117027 albums sorted by Price: from most expensive to least expensive and filtered by Jazz
$20.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

For those who have found B3 sensation Jimmy Smith's voluminous Blue Note catalog daunting and can't find a place to start, this handsome four-CD Retrospective, covering 30 years, may be the way in. Thirty-seven of the set's thirty-eight tracks are culled from Smith's albums recorded between 1956 and 1963 -- the last, recorded in 1986, is taken from his return to the Blue Note fold. While there is no unreleased stuff here -- no alternate takes, no odd sessions, nothing, strictly catalog tracks -- what is included is a stellar look at Smith's progression as an artist in a relatively short period. Most of the big numbers are here, especially form the early years, like "The Champ," and "The Preacher," as well as his jam tune "Fiddlin the Minors" and "Yarbird Suite." His beautiful "I Can't Get Started" is present, as is "Body and Soul" and "Slightly Monkish." Of the four R&B and soul burners, "I Got a Woman," "See See Rider," "Prayer Meetin," "Midnight Special," and "Pork Chop," are included as well. Full release and personnel documentation are in the notes and Bob Blumenthal's liner essay is informative and authoritative, particularly in his description of Smith's playing. Retrospective's price tag may be a hindrance for the curious, and old-school fans will no doubt have many if not all of these cuts. But for anyone wishing to have a solid history of one of the true innovators in the music, this is a very fine collection ~ Thom Jurek

Gospel - Released January 9, 2012 | Clemmons Records

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$83.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

$83.49

Jazz - Released August 10, 2010 | Verve Reissues

$230.99

Jazz - Released October 7, 1997 | Verve Reissues

While its sheer bulk negates its interest to a general audience, The Complete Bill Evans on Verve is an essential library piece for any serious jazz fan or historian. Spanning 18 CDs, 269 tracks and 21 hours, the box set includes all of Evans' recordings for the label between 1962 and 1969, including 19 albums, two previously unreleased albums and 98 previously unreleased tracks. During these years, the pianist made some of his greatest music, including his legendary Village Vanguard sessions, and the set charts all of his changes, as he plays with his trio and as a solo artist, as well as a rare session with a rhythm quartet and strings. While the set itself could be a little more user-friendly -- it's encased in a steel box, with a 160-page booklet and an 18-disc fanpack on separate shelves -- the music itself is nearly flawless and nearly essential for most serious jazz fans. ~ Leo Stanley
$108.99

Jazz - Released October 25, 1990 | Verve Reissues

As a leader, Charlie Parker recorded for Savoy and Dial during 1945-1948 and then for Verve exclusively (at least in the studios) during 1949-1954. This remarkable ten-CD box set, which adds quite a bit of material to an earlier ten-LP set, contains all of these recordings plus Bird's earlier appearances with Jazz at the Philharmonic. The JATP jams are highlighted by Parker's perfect solo on "Oh Lady Be Good," a ferocious improvisation on "The Closer," and a solo on "Embraceable You" that tops his more famous studio recording. In addition, this box has all of the "Bird and Strings" sides, his meetings with Machito's Cuban orchestra, the 1950 session with Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, small-group dates (including a 1951 meeting with Miles Davis), odd encounters with voices and studio bands, the famous "Jam Blues" with fellow altoists Johnny Hodges and Benny Carter, and his final recordings, a set of Cole Porter tunes. The fact-filled 34-page booklet is also indispensable. Highly recommended. ~ Scott Yanow
$51.49

Jazz - Released April 8, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Not much has been said about Duke Ellington's Reprise Records period, and even less that's enthusiastic, mostly owing to the fact that his output there ran between two extremes: dazzlingly inventive conceptual pieces juxtaposed with re-recordings of classic big-band material, and pop-jazz efforts built around covers of current popular songs. Amid that wildly divergent body of work, it's no surprise that the live material from The Great Paris Concert and Ellington's Greatest Hits eclipsed much of his Reprise studio work. Thus, this five-CD box is the first opportunity that most listeners will have had to assess the music properly. As with all Mosaic issues, it's in recording session order, and Disc One opens with Ellington's 1962 covers of classic big-band material. Disc Two is where things not only get interesting but downright spellbinding, containing the entirety of the Afro-Bossa Album -- this is some of the most beautiful, engaging, and forward-looking music of Ellington's 1960s output, and the varied rhythms and textures are coupled with some truly luscious playing. Disc Three is largely given over to the material off of Symphonic Ellington, mixed band and orchestra pieces dating from the period in which Ellington began writing concert music for orchestra. Disc Four is devoted to the Ellington '65 and Ellington '66 albums, renditions of current pop and rock & roll hits. Few of Ellington's serious fans have ever professed much love for his Mary Poppins album, the contents of which open Disc Five, but the material holds up quite well, mostly because the soloists are enjoying themselves. As usual with Mosaic, the annotation and sessionography material are thoroughly detailed. ~ Bruce Eder
$90.49

Jazz - Released August 1, 2013 | Castle Communications

$90.49

Jazz - Released March 1, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

$117.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

$111.99
$96.99

Free Jazz & Avant-Garde - Released May 25, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
Miles Davis had publicly called him a madman. Leonard Bernstein found him, for his part, completely awesome. Few were those that didn’t have a definitive opinion on Ornette Coleman. Some kind of outlaw who preferred playing his own compositions rather than jazz classics, the American saxophonist also developed harmolodics, a theory uniting harmonics and melody. Coleman would remain a trailblazer, a spoilsport who would influence legions of musicians, and would also annoy a good number of them… This box of ten discs compiles one of the most important era in the career of his author. Between 1959 and 1961, he released six studio albums for the Atlantic label. Six albums that are present here and spiced up with alternative takes and various bonuses, all of this of course impeccably remastered by John Webber. Through the opuses The Shape Of Jazz To Come (1959), Change Of The Century (1959), This Is Our Music (1960), Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation (1960), Ornette! (1961) and Ornette On Tenor (1961), and the compilations The Art Of Improvisers (1970), Twins (1971), To Whom Who Keeps A Record (1975) and The Ornette Coleman Legacy (1993), we discover the protean art of a musician that had never stopped reassessing himself. A singular and unique voice assisted by other singular and unique voices like Don Cherry, Charlie Haden, Scott LaFaro, Billy Higgins and Ed Blackwell. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$76.99

Jazz - Released November 21, 1989 | Verve Reissues

Although undoubtedly an expensive acquisition, this ten-CD set is perfectly done and contains dozens of gems. The remarkable but short-lived trumpeter Clifford Brown has the second half of his career fully documented (other than his final performance) and he is showcased in a wide variety of settings. The bulk of the numbers are of Brownie's quintet with co-leader and drummer Max Roach, either Harold Land or Sonny Rollins on tenor, pianist Richie Powell, and bassist George Morrow (including some previously unheard alternate takes), but there is also much more. Brown stars at several jam sessions (including a meeting with fellow trumpeters Clark Terry and Maynard Ferguson), accompanies such singers as Dinah Washington, Helen Merrill, and Sarah Vaughan, and is backed by strings on one date. Everything is here, including classic versions of "Parisian Thoroughfare," "Joy Spring," "Daahoud," "Coronado," a ridiculously fast "Move," "Portrait of Jenny," "Cherokee," "Sandu," "I'll Remember April," and "What Is This Thing Called Love?" Get this set while it stays in print. ~ Scott Yanow
$96.99

Free Jazz & Avant-Garde - Released May 25, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

Miles Davis had publicly called him a madman. Leonard Bernstein found him, for his part, completely awesome. Few were those that didn’t have a definitive opinion on Ornette Coleman. Some kind of outlaw who preferred playing his own compositions rather than jazz classics, the American saxophonist also developed harmolodics, a theory uniting harmonics and melody. Coleman would remain a trailblazer, a spoilsport who would influence legions of musicians, and would also annoy a good number of them… This box of ten discs compiles one of the most important era in the career of his author. Between 1959 and 1961, he released six studio albums for the Atlantic label. Six albums that are present here and spiced up with alternative takes and various bonuses, all of this of course impeccably remastered by John Webber. Through the opuses The Shape Of Jazz To Come (1959), Change Of The Century (1959), This Is Our Music (1960), Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation (1960), Ornette! (1961) and Ornette On Tenor (1961), and the compilations The Art Of Improvisers (1970), Twins (1971), To Whom Who Keeps A Record (1975) and The Ornette Coleman Legacy (1993), we discover the protean art of a musician that had never stopped reassessing himself. A singular and unique voice assisted by other singular and unique voices like Don Cherry, Charlie Haden, Scott LaFaro, Billy Higgins and Ed Blackwell. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$129.49

Jazz - Released November 17, 2014 | WM Sweden

$76.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | Verve Reissues

$64.49

Gospel - Released September 6, 2011 | Rhino Atlantic

$128.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Fantasy Records

While it's unquestionably true that saxophonist Dexter Gordon is best known for his Blue Note sides made between 1960 and 1965, it is on his Prestige recordings, the vast majority of which were taped between 1969 and 1973, where the full depth and breadth of his gift and contribution are documented. What's more, this box finally sets the historical and chronological record straight as many of Gordon's records were assembled from various sessions. The Complete Prestige Recordings consists of 11 CDs, charting Gordon's rise as a soloist in 1950 as part of the With Wardell Gray memorial album, and his reemergence after a period of drug addiction and imprisonment in 1960 with the album Resurgence. The story drops again as Gordon went on to record his seminal Blue Note sessions and picks up again with Booker Ervin, Jaki Byard, Reggie Workman and Alan Dawson on the electrifying Setting the Pace five years later. Gordon moved to Europe following this date for an extended sojourn there, and isn't heard from again until 1969's Tower of Power and More Power, two albums' worth of material recorded while visiting New York, with Barry Harris, Albert "Tootie" Heath, James Moody and Buster Williams. From these sessions, there are six previously unissued takes of the material in addition to the albums themselves. From 1969 until '73 Gordon's is featured in all sorts of settings, from quartets with Junior Mance, Martin Rivera and Oliver Jackson, as well as with Larry Ridley, Tommy Flanagan and Alan Dawson, to a quintet co-led with Gene Ammons that starred a young Steve McCall on drums! There is also the fine Jumpin' Blues session with Wynton Kelly, Sam Jones and Roy Brooks, as well as a gorgeous quintet with Freddie Hubbard, Cedar Walton, Billy Higgins and Buster Williams that was issued first as Tangerine and then as Generation. The Montreux performances are included here as well. From the quartets with Hampton Hawes, Kenny Clarke and Bob Cranshaw, to the steaming Gene Ammons and friends jam at Montreux with that trio, plus Ammons, Nat and Cannonball Adderley and Kenny Nash in addition to Dex. There are no less than eight unreleased performances from these various outings making for a wealth of previously unavailable Gordon in this box. What it adds up to is one of jazz music's most compelling and labyrinthine stories. One of an expatriate jazzman whose style was moving ever more expressionistically into new expansive harmonic and lyric conceptions informed by a tough, swaggering swinging application of the blues. The sound is phenomenal, the track by track documentation is a bit idiosyncratic in description but is nonetheless complete. There are also many fine and rare photographs, and the liner essay by Ted Panken is both exhaustive and authoritative. This set is long overdue and, combined with the Blue Note box, this gives for all practical and intent purposes, the definitive portrait of Gordon. ~ Thom Jurek
$57.49

Jazz - Released November 17, 1998 | Impulse!

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Here it is: eight CDs worth of John Coltrane's classic quartet, comprised of bassist Jimmy Garrison, pianist McCoy Tyner, and drummer Elvin Jones, recorded between December of 1961 and September of 1965 when the artist followed his restless vision and expanded the band before assembling an entirely new one before his death. What transpired over the course of the eight albums and supplementary material used elsewhere is nothing short of a complete transfiguration of one band into another one, from a band that followed the leader into places unknown to one that inspired him and pushed him further. All of this transpired in the span of only three years. The group that the saxophonist had assembled for Coltrane in 1962, a band that had been together a little while and had performed together at the Village Vanguard (the tracks that include the quartet without Eric Dolphy from Impressions are here, and, in fact, the first pieces on the set are from those session dates chronologically) in a variety of settings, is almost nothing like the band that made Kulu Se Mama in 1965. For a change, the oft-employed yet irritating chronological method of compiling a box makes sense here. McCoy Tyner's piano style, that rich open-ended modal chromaticism he developed was at work on "The Inchworm," astonishingly enough the first work recorded in the 1962 studio dates. "Out of This World" was one of the last from that session that would produce the album Coltrane. The blues element that would disappear from later records -- at least consciously -- was the driving force behind ballads like "Soul Eyes" and "After the Rain." But it isn't until the latter end of 1963 that we hear the band beginning to gel into the unit that would make A Love Supreme and create the tracks that would be assembled into First Meditations for Quartet. There are the two alternate takes of "Alabama," and the soprano solo that is positively danced around by the rhythm section on "Dear Old Stockholm." There is also the great schism in Coltrane, much that took place between the June 1964 session that produced "Crescent" (and its first version is on disc eight, which is full of supplementary and unreleased material) and the following December when A Love Supreme was recorded. Here is the hinges in the whole box, the questions that need to be resolved than that this box only begs more than answers: what happened to that tight conscripted modalism Coltrane had been working on in his official releases prior to that time period as many of them hold clues but never give away the entire picture. What the box does in its voluminous way is set the record straight that there was no retrenchment in pursuant releases to A Love Supreme. There were softer moments on record, but the material in the can was far more adventurous recorded at about the same time, such as the "Suite" or "Transition" or "Dusk Dawn." Disc eight is also a treat in that it contains seven "works in progress" from all periods in the quartet's history. It begins with the aforementioned version of "Crescent," which is appreciably different than the master take in Tyner's solo particularly. There's also an incomplete though steaming initial take of "Bessie's Blues." Perhaps the most beautiful thing on the final disc is the alternate take of part II of A Love Supreme's "Resolution," with its elongated obligato by Coltrane and Tyner's gorgeous tenths playing ostinato during the saxophone solo. There's an alternate of "Feelin' Good" that's no big deal, followed by breakdowns and alternate takes of both "Dear Lord" and "Living Space," both of which reveal the harmonic development of a scale as it becomes the architectural model for the rest of the composition and improvisation. There can be no arguing the value of the originally released recordings; whether they were issued during Coltrane's lifetime or after his death, they tell a story that millions of listeners formed their impressions by, true or false, and created a legacy that lives on. But there is also something to be said for setting the record straight, and the chronological approach that this set takes in no way desecrates the integrity of the original albums themselves -- unlike the Ornette Coleman box. Simply put, it is indispensable to those who need a deeper understanding of Coltrane's music and the development of his most influential period. The sound quality is fully remastered to 20-bit technology, and the package is unwieldy but beautiful and sturdy. It's a must. ~ Thom Jurek
$89.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard

Jazz - Released August 1, 2014 | Peacock Records Ltd

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Jazz in the magazine
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    Ralph Alessi and his Imaginary Friends Ralph Alessi's Imaginary Friends is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • A Tropical Tale
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  • Blurred Boundaries
    Blurred Boundaries Anne Paceo's Bright Shadows is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • To the Power of Three
    To the Power of Three Joe Lovano's Trio Tapestry is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • Dandy Man
    Dandy Man Bryan Ferry is the ultimate dandy, the singer that never gets old and who does as he pleases.
  • A Night of Nat
    A Night of Nat In 2017, Gregory Porter released a tribute album - or rather a love letter, to the man he considers his ultimate hero: Nat King Cole.
  • Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars
    Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars Jools Holland, the musical virtuoso, director and well-loved host of the BBC 2 programme Later… with Jools Holland since 1992, joins forces with the first-rate vocals of Marc Almond and the musicia...
  • 360° vision
    360° vision After two staggering studio albums (When the Heart Emerges Glistening in 2011 and The Imagined Savior Is Far Easier to Paint in 2014) and one brilliant live album (A Rift in Decorum in 2017), all t...
  • Leaning back to the 60s
    Leaning back to the 60s Jose James is bringing back the great soul music of the sixties.
  • Perfect unison
    Perfect unison Fifteen years on from Changing Places, his first album for the label ECM, Tord Gustavsen is once again offering up an album performed with a trio, which seems to be the line-up most in keeping with...