Albums

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Jazz - Released February 15, 2019 | L+R Records

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Jazz - Released February 4, 2019 | Dodicilune

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Jazz - Released February 1, 2019 | Tous Dehors

Jazz - Released February 1, 2019 | Jube Legends

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Jazz - Released February 1, 2019 | Jazzsential

The first in Classics' "complete" Jimmie Lunceford series has two titles apiece from 1930 (when the band was based in Tennessee) and 1933 along with its first six sessions for Decca in 1934. Lunceford's band had an immediately recognizable sound by 1934 and, despite the presence of such top soloists as altoist Willie Smith, tenor-saxophonist Joe Thomas and high-note trumpeter Tommy Stevenson, it was its arranged ensembles (particularly those of Sy Oliver) that gave the orchestra its musical identity. Among the better selections on this CD are "Flaming Reeds And Screaming Brass," "White Heat," "Swinging' Uptown," "Rose Room," "Miss Otis Regrets" and the band's fresh interpretations of Duke Ellington's "Black And Tan Fantasy" and "Mood Indigo." ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released February 1, 2019 | Jazzsential

The second of Classics' reissuance of all the master takes of Jimmie Lunceford's recordings finds the orchestra gaining in popularity and in power. Among the highlights (most of the songs were arranged by Sy Oliver or Ed Wilcox) are "Since My Beat Gal Turned Me Down," "Rhythm Is Our Business," "Shake Your Head," "Sleepy-Time Gal," "Four or Five Times" and "Swanee River." The high musicianship and clean ensembles (along with the showmanship) are most impressive and the concise solos (particularly from altoist Willie Smith, tenor saxophonist Joe Thomas and trumpeter Sy Oliver) are enjoyable and fit in logically as part of the arrangements. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released February 1, 2019 | Jazzsential

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Jazz - Released January 29, 2019 | Musekater Sound & Music

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$14.99

Jazz - Released January 25, 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet
For his entrance onto ECM (label), Yonathan Avishai kicks off Joys And Solitudes with Mood Indigo. By putting Ellington's masterpiece in the spotlight, the Franco-Israeli pianist (alongside double bassist Omer Avital and trumpeter Avishai Cohen) undoubtedly wanted to remind himself where he came from. This refined musician is part of a certain piano tradition that’s far removed from the usual Bill Evans/Keith Jarrett axis, both of whom were incredibly influential among musicians of his generation. In addition to The Duke, Yonathan Avishai approaches pieces by the great elders John Lewis, Ahmad Jamal and Bobby Timmons without ever plagiarizing their touch. "Ellington is still a thoroughly modern pianist and composer. His way of always telling a story while playing has influenced me a lot and Mood Indigo is a song I have loved for a long time. " > With his faithful rhythmic section (Yoni Zelnik, an Israeli double bass player based in Paris, and Donald Kontomanou, a French drummer with a double heritage, both Guinean and Greek) Avishai also reminds his listeners of the impressive composer that he is. He uncovers seven original pieces with pure, fat-free melodies, filled with blues and swing as well as silences and spaces... "I feel deeply rooted in tradition. Most of all, I love the history and the perspectives it opens up when you study it. I’m particularly interested in the history of jazz - from Louis Armstrong to Cecil Taylor and so on." ‘And so on’ indeed! On Les Pianos de Brazzaville, Yonathan Avishai evokes his trips to the Republic of Congo and Central Africa. The theme Tango is a response to the album Ojos Negros by Dino Saluzzi and Anja Lechner. The piece When Things Fall Apart takes its title from a novel by the American Buddhist Pema Chödrön, but is inspired by Avishai Cohen's music and is in fact a response to the trumpeter's composition Into The Silence. In the end, all this material fuels an album that’s full of grace and reinforces the conviction that Yonathan Avishai is a very great contemporary jazz pianist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$26.99

Free Jazz & Avant-Garde - Released January 25, 2019 | Resonance Records

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Experts in quality archives, Resonance Records, have dug up an essential Eric Dolphy gem. After leaving Prestige/New Jazz Records, the saxophonist worked during the summer of ‘63 with producer Alan Douglas (famous not only for his recordings with Jimi Hendrix but also for being behind the glass for the album Money Jungle with Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach). This meeting resulted in two albums: Iron Man and Conversations. The sessions were concocted with the crème de la crème of avant-garde jazz at that time: William "Prince" Lasha on flute, Huey "Sonny" Simmons on alto saxophone, Clifford Jordan on soprano saxophone, Woody Shaw on trumpet, Garvin Bushell on bassoon, Bobby Hutcherson on vibraphone, Richard Davis and Eddie Kahn on double bass and J.C. Moses and Charles Moffett on drums. Fast forward to January 2019: all the sessions from 1st and 3rd June 1963 have resurfaced, including some alternate takes. The tapes had been stored in a suitcase by Dolphy himself with other personal belongings just before he flew off on his last European tour, during which he died in Berlin on June 29th 1964 at the age of 36. The Californian had entrusted the suitcase to friends. Years later, it was recovered by flautist James Newton, who went through its content with Zev Feldman from Resonance Records and the pundits of the Eric Dolphy Trust in Los Angeles. With two and a half hours of music, Musical Prophet is a major document in Eric Dolphy's artistic evolution. A recording comparable to Out To Lunch!, his masterpiece for Blue Note released seven months later. But this is by no means a draft. Here, the group embark on trails both well-trodden and unexplored. Without cutting themselves off from their elders (Jitterbug Waltz by Fats Waller opens the album), they blow hot and cold and dare to explore all posibilities. Depending on the weapon of choice (alto saxophone, flute or bass clarinet), Dolphy expresses different qualities. Melancholic and introspective, almost as if irritated, if not panicky, he is constantly matched by accomplices who are just as quick as he is. And the musical freedom never erases the melodic framework. 56 years later, this emerging jazz has not lost any of its spontaneity and it would easily make some 2019 productions obsolete... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 25, 2019 | ECM

Booklet
For his entrance onto ECM (label), Yonathan Avishai kicks off Joys And Solitudes with Mood Indigo. By putting Ellington's masterpiece in the spotlight, the Franco-Israeli pianist (alongside double bassist Omer Avital and trumpeter Avishai Cohen) undoubtedly wanted to remind himself where he came from. This refined musician is part of a certain piano tradition that’s far removed from the usual Bill Evans/Keith Jarrett axis, both of whom were incredibly influential among musicians of his generation. In addition to The Duke, Yonathan Avishai approaches pieces by the great elders John Lewis, Ahmad Jamal and Bobby Timmons without ever plagiarizing their touch. "Ellington is still a thoroughly modern pianist and composer. His way of always telling a story while playing has influenced me a lot and Mood Indigo is a song I have loved for a long time. " > With his faithful rhythmic section (Yoni Zelnik, an Israeli double bass player based in Paris, and Donald Kontomanou, a French drummer with a double heritage, both Guinean and Greek) Avishai also reminds his listeners of the impressive composer that he is. He uncovers seven original pieces with pure, fat-free melodies, filled with blues and swing as well as silences and spaces... "I feel deeply rooted in tradition. Most of all, I love the history and the perspectives it opens up when you study it. I’m particularly interested in the history of jazz - from Louis Armstrong to Cecil Taylor and so on." ‘And so on’ indeed! On Les Pianos de Brazzaville, Yonathan Avishai evokes his trips to the Republic of Congo and Central Africa. The theme Tango is a response to the album Ojos Negros by Dino Saluzzi and Anja Lechner. The piece When Things Fall Apart takes its title from a novel by the American Buddhist Pema Chödrön, but is inspired by Avishai Cohen's music and is in fact a response to the trumpeter's composition Into The Silence. In the end, all this material fuels an album that’s full of grace and reinforces the conviction that Yonathan Avishai is a very great contemporary jazz pianist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$6.99

Jazz - Released January 24, 2019 | Wnts

$9.49

Jazz - Released January 20, 2019 | This is Acoustic

$7.99

Jazz - Released January 16, 2019 | Les musiques à ouïr

Jazz - Released January 11, 2019 | SWR Jazzhaus

Booklet
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Jazz - Released January 11, 2019 | Wnts

$5.99

Jazz - Released January 3, 2019 | EG Jazz

$4.99

Jazz - Released December 31, 2018 | Sounds Of The World

Genre

Jazz in the magazine
  • Ralph Alessi and his Imaginary Friends
    Ralph Alessi and his Imaginary Friends Ralph Alessi's Imaginary Friends is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • A Tropical Tale
    A Tropical Tale Leyla McCalla's The Capitalist Blues is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • Blurred Boundaries
    Blurred Boundaries Anne Paceo's Bright Shadows is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • To the Power of Three
    To the Power of Three Joe Lovano's Trio Tapestry is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!
  • Dandy Man
    Dandy Man Bryan Ferry is the ultimate dandy, the singer that never gets old and who does as he pleases.
  • A Night of Nat
    A Night of Nat In 2017, Gregory Porter released a tribute album - or rather a love letter, to the man he considers his ultimate hero: Nat King Cole.
  • Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars
    Afternoon Tea and Vintage Cars Jools Holland, the musical virtuoso, director and well-loved host of the BBC 2 programme Later… with Jools Holland since 1992, joins forces with the first-rate vocals of Marc Almond and the musicia...
  • 360° vision
    360° vision After two staggering studio albums (When the Heart Emerges Glistening in 2011 and The Imagined Savior Is Far Easier to Paint in 2014) and one brilliant live album (A Rift in Decorum in 2017), all t...
  • Leaning back to the 60s
    Leaning back to the 60s Jose James is bringing back the great soul music of the sixties.
  • Perfect unison
    Perfect unison Fifteen years on from Changing Places, his first album for the label ECM, Tord Gustavsen is once again offering up an album performed with a trio, which seems to be the line-up most in keeping with...