Albums

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Humour - Released September 28, 2018 | Sony Music Catalog

Humour - Released January 3, 2018 | Studio 100

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Humour - Released January 1, 2008 | Broadway Video - Republic Records

For a comedy group that was born and raised in visual mediums -- web videos and the Saturday Night Live television show -- the Lonely Island are still way ahead of the curve when it comes to the comedy album format. Of course, music was at least half the reason links to their series of SNL Digital Shorts would dominate in-boxes every following Monday. The smart mimicry of teen pop ("Dick in a Box"), Euro-disco ("Jizz in My Pants"), or old-school rap ("Lazy Sunday") is half the attraction, and when you add the "aw shucks" look of on-camera Islander Andy Samberg, you can get away with a lot of shocking material. So many mentions of naughty bits would be tedious if Samberg and SNL writers Akiva Schaffer and Jorma Taccone didn't have the brains to pull it off, and dealing with the differences between races seems much less dangerous when the trio show they're well-versed in the works of their hip-hop guests, E-40 and T-Pain. Their hiring of eccentric underground rap producer J-Zone shows their in tune with what's next and when white rasta wannabe "Ras Trent" complains of his "bomboclat parents" and declares he can make a chalice out of a Sprite can, the snarky commentary is made all the sweeter by a lyric that drops two deep reggae references: "Me night nurse never want to plant de corn." The track has also been updated so that a visual joke from the original SNL version is removed, and with all the interludes and new material, plus fake alternative album covers throughout the booklet, this isn't an afterthought but a fully committed comedy album. On top of that, it's a hilarious comedy album that's just as hip, inventive, and inappropriate as their digital shorts. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released March 1, 1999 | EastWest Germany

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Humour - Released January 1, 2011 | Broadway Video - Republic Records

Back once again with the ill behavior, Lonely Island’s second effort is more of the same, which for many means that life is still worth living. Irony and stupidity abound as the crew has its way with that sweet and rare event called “lovemaking” (“I Just Had Sex” with Akon), your Mom (“Motherlover” with Justin Timberlake), hip-hop culture (“No Homo”), and popular culture in general (pretty much everything else), as interludes that owe a lot to Adam Sandler tie it all together. The jokes are the main attraction -- they contrast extreme bravado and extreme embarrassment for maximum hilarity -- but the great trick behind Lonely Island is their keen awareness of whatever genre they are mocking. With the right beats and production, “The Creep” is the kind of stalker anthem you’d expect if stalkers posted tracks on hip-hop blogs, while “Jack Sparrow” is the Michael Bolton power ballad to perfection, and even comes with a hearty helping of Michael Bolton. Bad news for newcomers is that tracks like “Shy Ronnie 2: Bonnie & Clyde” won’t work well away from their visuals, meaning Turtleneck & Chain is sometimes a souvenir for Saturday Night Live viewers, who know just how much that slow motion video helps a cut like “Threw It on the Ground.” That said, the title track is killer, “We’re Back!” might be the ultimate intro, and if you can deny shelf space to an album with “Trouble on Dookie Island” on the track list, you’re probably much more “Watch Me Do Me” than “I Just Had Sex” anyway. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released December 9, 2003 | Comedy Central

Absurd like Steven Wright but nowhere near as laid-back, Mitch Hedberg throws out one bizarre observation after another on Mitch All Together. Hedberg builds on Wright's weird observational slant and has the same obsession with minutia, but while Wright was the man who fell to earth, Hedberg is a thinking man's Jeff Spicoli. His slack-jawed, foul-mouthed, stoner delivery takes some getting used to, but his material is great. The comedian points out that imprinting a chocolate bar with the candy's name robs people of chocolate, Dr. Pepper is better than Mr. Pibb because Pepper has a degree, and that escalators never really break down, they just become stairs. Wickedly riffing on these topics for longer than Wright ever did has given Hedberg a cult following and listening to Mitch All Together you can understand the excitement. Comedy Central makes it easy for the newbies to catch up by including a DVD featuring two of Hedberg's appearances on the network, one unedited. Barely any of the material overlaps and the whole package makes for a great introduction to this talented up-and-comer. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released May 25, 2018 | 800 Pound Gorilla Records

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Humour - Released March 30, 2009 | Comedy Central

Taking his glorification of American laziness to a whole new level, Jim Gaffigan's King Baby tops his 2006 release, Beyond the Pale, a rare platinum-selling comedy album that is referenced here right off ("I thought he'd be paler. Least as pale as that CD where he looks like a pedophile"). The track "Inside Voice" is named after the comedian's signature falsetto alter-ego voice, a device that's used sparingly and purposefully here, completely taking the "it's a crutch" argument off the table. With less of it, there are fewer cheap laughs, allowing Gaffigan to build momentum as he heralds bowling ("The activity you do after you've done everything else"), hammocks ("nets for catching lazy people"), and Waffle House ("I love Waffle House, and not just because watching someone fry an egg while they're smoking reminds me of my dad"). The bit on bologna and it's spelling vs. pronunciation -- decided by the man responsible for "colonel" -- is especially funny, but it's the epic riffing on bacon that becomes the set's centerpiece and somewhat of a sequel to Beyond the Pale's big comedy hit "Hot Pockets." There are a few Jesus jokes and such that might not fly with some, but this is otherwise a family-friendly effort with no profanity. It's also Gaffigan in top form, remaining laugh-out-loud funny the whole way through. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released November 30, 2016 | Comedy Central

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Humour - Released June 26, 2015 | F.A.M.E. Recordings

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Humour - Released July 15, 2014 | RCA Records Label

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Already accepted as a bona fide talent in the world of parody -- his musicianship, comedic timing, his pop-culture reference awareness, and his great wordplay are all well-documented -- the only thing that matters when it comes to "Weird Al" Yankovic albums is how inspired the king of novelty songs sounds on any given LP. On his 14th studio album, Mandatory Fun, the inspiration meter goes well into the red, something heard instantly as Iggy Azalea's electro-rap "Fancy" does a complete 180 thematically on the opening "Handy," the song now heading toward the local home improvement store where the craftsmen vogue in their orange vests and blow sweet come-ons like "I'll bring you up to code" and "My socket wrenches are second to none." Pharrell's "Happy" becomes "Tacky" and Al's amazing ability to follow an everyday poke ("Wear my Ed Hardy shirt with fluorescent orange pants") with something brainy and reserved ("Got my new résumé, it's printed in Comic Sans") surprises once more, but for end-to-end "wows," it's his brilliant redo of Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines," now the smug and twerking "Word Crimes," which gives copy editors, English professors, and grammar nerds a reason to hit the dancefloor ("And listen up when I tell you this/I hope you never use quotation marks for emphasis!"). Hardcore and hilarious musical moments start to happen when Imagine Dragons' "Radioactive" becomes "Inactive," a singalong anthem for the sluggish and the slovenly ("Near comatose, no exercise/Don't tag my toe, I'm still alive") with a dubstep-rock bassline that sounds like Galactus burping. Better still is the every-Al-album pop-polka medley, this time called "Now That's What I Call Polka!" which polkas-up Daft Punk ("Get Lucky"), PSY ("Gangnam Style"), and Miley Cyrus ("Wrecking Ball"), and with more Spike Jones-styled sound effects than usual. As for the originals this time out, the "you suck!"-minded "Sports Song" will be unavoidable under Friday night lights once a teen gets hold of it, while the ranting and wonderfully weird "First World Problems" sounds more like the Pixies than anything the Pixies did in 2014. Wonders never cease on Mandatory Fun, and neither do the laughs. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released February 16, 2018 | 800 Pound Gorilla Records

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Humour - Released March 23, 2018 | 800 Pound Gorilla Records

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Humour - Released March 30, 2018 | 800 Pound Gorilla Records

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Humour - Released December 9, 2003 | Comedy Central

Strategic Grill Locations is a traditional comedy record with Mitch Hedberg telling a string of one-liners and brief stories for the length of the CD. His subject matter and observations fall far from the traditional, but in form Strategic Grill Locations is a straightforward comedy record that matches Hedberg's devotion to pure standup. His wild thoughts and well-crafted delivery transcend the joke-after-joke format and make this one of the best comedy albums you are likely to hear. He was an excellent joke-teller with one of the most unique voices in standup comedy. What makes Hedberg's performance so endearing is his intense self-consciousness and the way he incorporates the crowd into the recording of the CD. He draws the audience in and really explains the process he is going through by telling one-liners and throwing out offhand comments. "I wrote a list of jokes to go on the CD," he explains with his recognizable delivery. "These are the CD jokes. I may add jokes to the set in a moment of spontaneity which you will be unable to detect." Hedberg openly mocks his own jokes and apologizes for telling the same joke with different ingredients, which adds to his cool but confused stage presence. Like a simplified and meditative George Carlin, he examines the language, saying, "I didn't sleep for ten days because that would be too long" and "My friend said, 'I hear music' as if there was any other way you could take it in." Strategic Grill Locations captures Hedberg as a kind of Reverend Jim Ignatowski/Rodney Dangerfield hybrid. The contrabass that plays throughout the set adds to the beatnik coffeehouse vibe that suits his comedy so well. Hedberg delivers line after line of strange and funny comments and observations, never taking any story too far away from a punch line. More than any other comedian of his generation, Mitch Hedberg was endlessly quotable. Every few seconds of Strategic Grill Locations brings another classic "Mitch." ~ Matt Whalley
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Humour - Released September 9, 2008 | Comedy Central

Gone far too soon, Do You Believe in Gosh? is the first posthumous Mitch Hedberg release, one recorded live in Ontario, Canada in early 2005 when the surreal comic was working on an album that would never be. Anyone familiar with the Live in Chicago bootleg will recognize quite a bit of the material here and might also notice how it's being refined and worked into a routine worthy of official release. Unfortunately, it's not quite there yet and not up to the standards of Hedberg's two official albums -- Mitch All Together and Strategic Grill Locations -- which somehow did the impossible and linked a slew of Steven Wright-styled one liners into a cohesive end-to-end listen. This is Mitch warts and all, desperately trying to regain a rhythm when jokes start to fail and only sometimes getting in that Hedberg groove where "wow man" meets relaxed focus. The good news is that the drugs that ended his life don't seem to be affecting this set at all and the lines that do work are numerous and work splendidly. After wondering how clean the inside of cleaning fluid bottle must be, he offers "If I had a dollar for every time I said that I'd be making money in a very weird way." "Now is a hippopotamus a hippopotamus or a really cool opotamus?" is typical Mitch and the riffing on how tough kids in Venice must have "canal smarts" is hilarious. The liner notes feature scribbles from Mitch's notebooks plus a short, sweet, and heartwarming note from his widow Lynn Shawcroft. Not the Hedberg CD to start with, but for his rabid cult following this is a necessary purchase. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released April 6, 2018 | Jupiter

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Humour - Released January 1, 2013 | Broadway Video - Republic Records

Booklet
While their first two albums of self-styled "fake rap" split the difference between rap album and comedy record, the Lonely Island's third outing, The Wack Album, finds the trio gearing up to really explore their own uncoolness with hilarious results. On the surface, it might seem like the group is simply sitting back and taking pot shots at rap culture, but the truth -- perfectly encapsulated by the back cover photo of the group standing in a pasture with a horse while wearing plaid dinner jackets -- is that the album is really an exploration of their own innate wackness. The Lonely Island don't try to come off as larger than life figures, but rather to showcase how sadly mundane they are compared to the club bangin' production that anchors their tracks. Instead of sipping Cristal and riding in style in the back of a Maybach, they're buying diapers and making down payments on reasonably priced, though not ideally located, grave plots in "Diaper Money." Instead of stirring up beef with others rappers, they use the track "The Compliments," which features a guest spot from a bewildered Too $hort, to let everyone know just how good they are at making skinny margaritas and helping out in the kitchen. Most impressive about The Wack Album is that the Lonely Island manage to get their jokes across without feeling like they're making fun of rap which, given how much material they'd have by making fun of themselves, would really be a last resort. ~ Gregory Heaney
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Humour - Released April 25, 2014 | Comedy Central

As the big, bawdy bard of Middle America, comedian Jim Gaffigan sings the praises of fatty foods, greasy foods, and sugary foods with love and flair; plus, he finds the state of laziness as something to embrace in the same way a motivational speaker embraces success. "I don't know if you can tell by my beard, but I'm fat" he admits during the opening of his 2014 release Obsessed, a show that borrows a bit from his 2013 book Dad Is Fat, including insights like "I don't know what happened. All I did was eat constantly, and now I'm fat." Sure, all this goofing on gluttony makes for a narrow set that no nutritionist should ever have to endure, but those who love the comedian know that an artery clogging diet has long been his muse, ever since his hilarious "Hot Pockets" routine hit the comedy scene hard, and would up his "Freebird" to his "Stairway to Heaven." Here, "Fried Bread" ("You ever eat food in your car so you don't have to share with your children? You're ready for fried bread.") is a worthy almost-equal-to-"Hot Pockets," with the rest of the gastric laughs coming from foods he hates. This includes crab ("Hey, I found a rock with some snot in it. I'm thinking of eating it!"), kale ("That stuff tastes like bug spray"), and that salty stuff in the tin that dad used to eat ("What exactly is the difference between an anchovy and a sweaty eyebrow?"), but after so many years, even guitar god Eddie Van Halen added keyboards to the mix, so don't be too shocked when Gaffigan flips the script, and wins. The weird world of weddings ("Last wedding I was at, everyone got a wine stopper filled with sand because the theme of the wedding was 'waste'") and their registries ("A nice way of saying 'You don't have to get us anything, but if you do, make sure it is one of these things'") are hilarious fodder, while solid social criticism comes under his command with the great "The Black Hills of South Dakota are sacred to the Lakota Indians, and out of respect, our government carved four white guys into one of the mountains." Add it all up, and it's as if Gaffigan's career was following the same blueprint as the punk rock group Green Day, coming out of the gate with a roar and then evolving into something bigger while losing none of that initial strength. Think of his 2006 album Beyond the Pale as his Dookie since it's got that new artist energy and the big "Hot Pockets" hit, then think of Obsessed as his mature and massive American Idiot, and hope that Broadway gets to work on an adaptation. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released January 18, 2011 | piraterecords