Albums

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Humour - To be released March 22, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - To be released March 22, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released December 18, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released November 26, 2018 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released November 30, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released August 24, 2004 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released July 13, 2004 | Warner Bros.

Almost five years after the mediocre Stan and Judy's Kid, Adam Sandler returns with a winning set of sophomoric potty humor. Recycling the structure of every Sandler album before it -- minus the songs-only What's Your Name -- Shhh...Don't Tell bounces between songs and sketches but the vulgarity has been kicked up a notch. It's a great move considering that the on-screen Sandler has been venturing into Jimmy Stewart territory. There'll be none of that here, as Sandler introduces listeners to the proud "Mayor of Pu**ytown," a man named "Timmy Tinyhole" who can't impress his friends with his puny flatulence, and a "Gay Robot" that just happens to be a master of football statistics ("The Eagles will win in three. Now can I grab your butt?"). "Secret" is the highlight with its Euro-disco ode to men who worry about their bikini lines too much. The bumbling character Pibb is a one-trick pony the album could have had a little less of, but fans have been waiting for Sandler to come back to this absurd and low-brow style of humor for too long. The characters on Shhh...Don't Tell are hardly the sweetheart Mr. Deeds was, and the album is all the funnier because of it. ~ David Jeffries
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Humour - Released September 10, 1999 | Warner Bros.

It says something that Adam Sandler returned to recording comedy albums after he became a superstar, earning 20 million dollars per movie. Perhaps the records gave Sandler the opportunity to explore his well-documented vulgar side, something that he couldn't really do in Big Daddy, the movie that appeared three months before his fourth album, Stan and Judy's Kid. Then again, Stan and Judy's Kid isn't all that vulgar, at least compared to his previous efforts. Sure, there's the predictable profanities, smutty jokes, and the like, but those are balanced by absurdity and deliberately annoying character sketches, like the ridiculously over-long "Whitey." These sketches alternate with songs, such as the bad hip-hop parody "Dee Wee (My Friend the Massive Idiot") and the crowd-pleasing "Chanukah Song, Pt. II." The fact that he has to write a sequel to one of his most famous routines indicates how routine Stan and Judy's Kid feels. Parts of it are mildly amusing, parts are actively irritating, but none of it surprises or shocks or even elicits genuine belly laughs or outrage. Perhaps expanding his on-screen persona to include sentiment has dulled his off-screen comedic persona somewhat, but that's not really the case, either. The simple fact is he didn't seize this opportunity to run wild; he didn't give himself the chance to really piss off his vocal critics or please an audience hungry for moronic schtick. It's just an average comedy album -- and he hasn't made one of those before. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Humour - Released February 9, 1996 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released September 5, 1997 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released September 24, 1993 | Warner Bros.

In his incredibly successful run of films, Adam Sandler's constant has been his penchant for playing the jokey everyman. From Happy Gilmore to Mr. Deeds, he's the likeable lout with a heart of gold and a love of guy stuff like hockey, farts, and McDonald's breakfasts. His perpetual hangdog look and Jewish-joke songs have carried him a long way since 1993, when the Saturday Night Live alum issued They're All Gonna Laugh at You, his first -comedy album. The humor was of the class-clown school: crass, obvious, and self-absorbed. But its bits formed the foundation of Sandler's charmingly foul comic empire. Instead of its stated purpose as a concept album based loosely on high school, Laugh functions more as a kiss-off to Sandler's own adolescence. "Who's laughing now?" he seems to be asking. Of course, that's only in its subtext. On the surface, the album is dominated by classless sex jokes and weak ideas that linger like too-long SNL sketches. (The self-explanatory "Longest Pee" is interminable). But in the obtuse exhortations of The Buffoon, or his lovingly wicked tribute to the lunch lady, Sandler established jokes a generation of college students could repeat for hours and would pay to see at sold-out shows. Like all of his impersonations, The Buffoon is simply Sandler, amplified and goofy. "I got a snake, man! One time I gave it some beer! It was slithering this way and that! It was all f*cked up!" It's a joke reduced to its blatant catchphrase. Of course, the same technique falls on its face when applied to "Beating of a High School Bus Driver" and its lame cousins. But as sexual humor, it again becomes stupid fun. In "At a Medium Pace" and "Assistant Principal's Big Day," Sandler becomes the kid on the playground whose brother taught him all the bad words; amazingly, it's still cringingly funny, if only because he's obviously enjoying being so bad. In telling fashion, They're All Gonna Laugh at You ends with The Buffoon getting the girl (actually just pal David Spade). Sandler's album made hit comedy from his childhood terrors and he laughed all the way to the bank. ~ Johnny Loftus
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Humour - Released June 15, 2004 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released June 8, 2004 | Warner Bros.

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Humour - Released November 4, 2003 | Warner Bros.

Triumph the Insult Comic Dog is one of the more unlikely artists to ever record for Warner Bros., and also one of the funniest. Come Poop With Me consists of musical bits recorded in front of a live audience and in the studio along with a handful of prank phone calls. A whole bunch of comedy big shots stop by to help out. Adam Sandler joins Triumph for the spirited hip-hop ballad "30 Seconds of Magic," Horatio Sanz appears as Stinky Faye and he and Triumph lament over the sad state of current comedy while reminding people that "You Have to Work Blue," Jack Black and Triumph drop some heavy metal thunder on "Bob Barker" and Sandler, Black, Sanz, Conan O'Brian, and Maya Rudolph all join together for the inspirational power ballad "Together in Pooping." Other hilarious songs include the racy ode to doggie jailbait "Underage Bichon," the duet with Blackwolf the Dragonmaster on "Blackwolf," rap track "I Keed" (which manages to insult most of the music industry), and the cat haters' anthem "Cats are C****." The prank calls aren't as funny as the musical gags; there aren't any real laugh-out-loud bits and they go on for too long. If you laugh at the idea of a dog puppet working extremely blue, then you came to the right place. Check your PC at the door and enjoy a record that is really good -- to poop on. The disc also comes with a DVD that has some of the songs featured on the CD as well as a few that weren't. It also has interviews with "celebs" (like Kurt Loder, Janeane Garofalo, Jared from the annoying Subway ads, and that loser from Arliss, Robert Wuhl), in which Triumph gives them the old rock 'em, sock 'em. This is the best release ever by a dog puppet, and that is really saying something. ~ Tim Sendra
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Humour - Released October 28, 2003 | Warner Bros.