Albums

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Hard Rock - Released December 12, 1977 | Universal Digital Enterprises

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Hard Rock - Released March 3, 2017 | WM Spain

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Hard Rock - Released August 8, 2013 | Sanctuary Records

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Hard Rock - Released April 17, 1982 | Sanctuary Records

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Hard Rock - Released June 1, 1982 | ROCKPORT

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Hard Rock - Released February 13, 1983 | Baratos Afins

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Hard Rock - Released June 4, 1983 | Sanctuary Records

To this day, Another Perfect Day remains one of the most unique (albeit misunderstood) albums in the entire Motörhead catalog. The band's first effort sans legendary axe-meister "Fast" Eddie Clarke (following six albums, of which at least three are still considered timeless classics), Another Perfect Day would be the band's only outing with onetime Thin Lizzy axeman Brian "Robbo" Robertson. Clearly a nervous musical marriage from the start, the album captures Motörhead mainstays Ian "Lemmy" Kilmister and "Philthy Animal" Taylor struggling to adapt their raw power and unparalleled distortion to Robertson's more mainstream hard rock instincts and melodic tendencies. Thanks in part to Tony Platt's excellent production, Another Perfect Day ranks among the band's best-sounding records ever, but tinkering with a legendary formula is always fraught with danger (is that a boogie-woogie piano on "Rock It"?), and as one might expect, the results here are alternately exhilarating and sometimes frustrating. On the one hand, the glorious arpeggiated melodies that characterize singles "Dancing on Your Grave" and "Shine" (Robertson's most obvious contributions here) were a total shock to the system by classic Motörhead standards, but their popularity and ultimate longevity as band highlights is a testament to their excellence. Furthermore, other drawn-out blues exercises like "One Track Mind" (which wouldn't sound out of place on any number of early Ted Nugent albums) and "I Got Mine" simply took the intensity and power of previously delivered sub-three-minute blasts and diluted it into four to five minutes, which had some fans impatiently glancing at their clocks. The title track barely escapes this predicament, and tighter, punchier numbers like "Back at the Funny Farm" and "Die You Bastard" manage to revisit the classic bile and fury of years past, but Robertson's unwillingness to be a team player (refusing to play standards like "Bomber" live, never mind his ridiculous fashion sense) virtually guaranteed his eventual sacking. By extension, Another Perfect Day is doomed to be considered a curiosity to this very day. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia & John Franck
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Hard Rock - Released March 27, 1984 | Columbia

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Hard Rock - Released June 1, 1984 | ROCKPORT

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Hard Rock - Released November 15, 1984 | Pasha Records

Condition Critical, Quiet Riot's follow-up to their number one, multi-million-selling commercial breakthrough Metal Health, is nearly identical to its predecessor. Not only do they repeat the hard-driving pop-metal hybrid to the last detail, they even throw in another Slade cover. Like on Metal Health, the Slade cover on Condition Critical ("Mama Weer All Crazee Now") is the finest moment on the record -- it's the only time the riffs have a solid hook and the melody is memorable. However, the rest of the record is well produced and sounds good, even if the quality of the songs is somewhat poor. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Hard Rock - Released December 3, 1984 | Arista

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Hard Rock - Released January 1, 1985 | Baratos Afins

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Hard Rock - Released April 1, 1985 | Hot Rock Records

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Hard Rock - Released June 1, 1985 | ROCKPORT

Hard Rock - Released July 1, 1985 | Laneway Music

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Hard Rock - Released June 1, 1986 | ENERGY

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Hard Rock - Released July 17, 1986 | Pasha Records

Quiet Riot's third release showed the band sticking fairly close to its strengths (melodic hard rock custom made to be blasted at parties). Bassist Rudy Sarzo was replaced by Chuck Wright (both Sarzo and Wright had been members at different times prior), as the group set out to regain the fans they lost due to singer Kevin DuBrow's press-happy motor mouth. A heavier emphasis on keyboards suggests the band was trying to keep in step with such other chart topping bands as Night Ranger and Bon Jovi, as evidenced by the popular rocker/MTV video, "The Wild and the Young" and the more restrained "Twilight Hotel." Although QR III was greeted favorably by their remaining fans, the album failed to match the mega-sales of their debut, METAL HEALTH. With constant bickering behind the scenes, DuBrow was handed his walking papers shortly after the ensuing tour ended.
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Hard Rock - Released January 1, 1987 | Moscow City Records

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Hard Rock - Released March 3, 1987 | Epic

Weekend Warriors, Ted Nugent's follow-up to the career peaks of Cat Scratch Fever and Double Live Gonzo, isn't quite as strong as his two previous albums, but it remains one of his better albums, featuring a handful of prime hard rockers. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Hard Rock - Released July 1, 1987 | Laneway Music

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