Albums

$9.49

Hard Rock - Released March 20, 2019 | Hammer Records (HMR Music Kft.)

$9.99

Hard Rock - Released October 19, 2018 | AFM Records

$9.99

Hard Rock - Released May 25, 2018 | Rock Of Angels Records

Hard Rock - Released April 27, 2018 | Rock Of Angels Records

Download not available
$8.99

Hard Rock - Released May 5, 2017 | AFM Records

$8.99

Hard Rock - Released May 5, 2017 | AFM Records

$10.99

Hard Rock - Released April 28, 2017 | Andromeda Relix

$2.49

Hard Rock - Released March 19, 2015 | Massacre Records

$29.49
$25.49

Hard Rock - Released February 3, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
$25.49

Hard Rock - Released February 3, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$11.49

Hard Rock - Released August 12, 1985 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$11.49

Hard Rock - Released July 21, 1987 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$12.99

Hard Rock - Released February 1, 1994 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$12.99

Hard Rock - Released July 12, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$11.49

Hard Rock - Released July 12, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$8.99

Hard Rock - Released January 1, 1991 | Ultim Records

$6.99

Hard Rock - Released August 30, 2013 | AFM Records

$14.99
$12.99

Hard Rock - Released October 27, 1981 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
1981's Mob Rules was the second Black Sabbath album to feature vertically challenged singer Ronnie James Dio, whose powerful pipes and Dungeons and Dragons lyrics initially seemed like the perfect replacement for the recently departed and wildly popular Ozzy Osbourne. In fact, all the ingredients which had made their first outing, Heaven and Hell, so successful are re-utilized on this album, including legendary metal producer Martin Birch (Deep Purple, Whitesnake, etc.) and supporting keyboard player Geoff Nichols. And while it lacks some of its predecessor's inspired songwriting, Mob Rules was given a much punchier, in-your-face mix by Birch, who seemed re-energized after his work on New Wave of British Heavy Metal upstarts Iron Maiden's Killers album. Essentially, Mob Rules is a magnificent record, with the only serious problem being the sequencing of the material, which mirrors Heaven and Hell's almost to a tee. In that light, one can't help but compare otherwise compelling tracks like "Turn Up the Night" and "Voodoo" to their more impressive Heaven and Hell counterparts, "Neon Knights" and "Children of the Sea." That streak is soon snapped, first by the unbelievably heavy seven-minute epic "The Sign of the Southern Cross," which delivers one of the album's best moments, then its segue into an unconventional synthesizer-driven instrumental ("E5150") and the appearance of the roaring title track. Side two is less consistent, hiding the awesome "Falling off the Edge of the World" (perhaps the most overlooked secret gem to come from the Dio lineup) amongst rather average tracks like "Slipping Away" and "Over and Over." Over the next year, the wheels fell off for Black Sabbath, and Dio's exit marked Mob Rules as the last widely respected studio release of the band's storied career. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
$11.99
$10.49

Hard Rock - Released April 15, 1980 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
Many had left Black Sabbath for dead at the dawn of the '80s, and with good reason -- the band's last few albums were not even close to their early classics, and original singer Ozzy Osbourne had just split from the band. But the Sabs had found a worthy replacement in former Elf and Rainbow singer Ronnie James Dio, and bounced back to issue their finest album since the early '70s, 1980's Heaven and Hell. The band sounds reborn and re-energized throughout. Several tracks easily rank among Sabbath's all-time best, such as the vicious album opener, "Neon Knights," the moody, mid-paced epic "Children of the Sea," and the title track, which features one of Tony Iommi 's best guitar riffs. With Heaven and Hell, Black Sabbath were obviously back in business. Unfortunately, the Dio-led version of the band would only record one more studio album before splitting up (although Dio would return briefly in the early '90s). One of Sabbath's finest records. ~ Greg Prato