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Funk - Released July 8, 2014 | Motown

With his hustler look, his stash of coke and his huge ego, Rick James was the free electron from planet funk. Pushing everything to the limits, both in his life and his music, he embodied the crazy side of America in the ‘80s. With more than 100 tracks, this box set brings together all his recordings for Motown, including B-sides and maxis. There are essentially nine albums: Come Get It! (1978), Bustin' Out of L Seven and Fire It Up (1979), Garden of Love (1980), Street Songs (1981), Throwin' Down (1982), Cold Blooded (1983), Glow (1985) and The Flag (1986).Of course, Street Songs is the masterpiece that stands out from the crowd. It’s like the missing link between the P-Funk universe and Prince's Purple Rain. Perfectly encapsulating the African-American music from the early eighties, Street Songs is a brilliant fusion of disco and funk. But Rick James injects only the most essential bone marrow of disco into his raw, wild funk. And while the aim is to fill the dancefloor, the lyrics are far from meaningless… Leave Prince alone for two minutes, and rediscover this 5-star funkster, the only musician to ever bring us such a sizzling style of funk and a brand-new sound to Motown in the ‘80s. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Funk - Released January 7, 2011 | Soul Tay Shus

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Funk - Released January 1, 2002 | Funky Delicacies

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Funk - Released September 26, 2011 | Now Again Records

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Funk - Released August 20, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Funk - Released August 20, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Records

Perhaps even more so than his '70s fusion period, trumpeter Miles Davis' recordings for Warner Bros. from the '80s sharply divided audiences. If 1970's Bitches Brew forced jazz fans to take sides in the debate over what qualifies as jazz, albums like 1986's Tutu and 1989's Amandla were dismissed outright by the jazz police as over-produced pop albums that bore little if any resemblance to Davis' classic recordings of the '50s and '60s. Despite such backlash from the elite, Tutu earned Davis a Grammy Award, and his records from this era often sold better than his previous, more reverent albums. Long in gestation, the 2015 eight-disc Miles Davis box set The Last Word: The Warner Bros. Years brings together all of the albums the trumpeter recorded for Warner Bros. from 1986 to 1991, plus various live recordings. Originally planned for release as far back as 2001, issues with the Davis estate meant the collection went unreleased. Instead, the label released several similar collections, including 2010's Perfect Way and 2011's 1986-1991: The Warner Years. While those sets offered useful thumbnail-sketch versions of Davis' career with Warner, they are not the complete picture that is The Last Word. Choosing for various reasons to part ways with his longtime label Columbia, Davis signed with Warner Bros. in 1985. Coming out of the tail end of his electric fusion period of the '70s and early '80s, Davis embarked on what would be his final creative period, recording and performing right up until his death in September 1991. A fruitful time for Davis, albums included here like Tutu, Amandla, and Doo-Bop found him utilizing modern technology such as computerized loops and overdubs. Working with a bevy of talented younger musicians including bassist Marcus Miller and guitarist John Scofield, Davis continued to embrace a cross-genre aesthetic, delving further into funk and hip-hop, and even collaborating with post-punk outfits like Scritti Politti (whose "Perfect Way" he covered on Tutu). Also included are Davis' soundtracks for the films Siesta and Dingo, the latter of which found him reuniting with composer Michel Legrand. Davis' Warner years also found him at the apex of his return to the stage, and to that end, this collection includes three discs of live recordings, the most notable being the storied 1991 Montreux concert with Quincy Jones in which he revisited his classic Gil Evans arrangements. Recorded months before his death, the Montreux concert impossibly brought Davis' relentlessly forward-thinking career full circle. Ultimately, while Davis' Warner years will probably never appeal to the jazz police, they reveal an artist who remained a maverick until the end. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Funk - Released January 1, 1998 | Night Train International

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Funk - Released February 1, 2005 | Funky Delicacies

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Funk - Released January 1, 1975 | Night Train International

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Funk - Released January 1, 1968 | Night Train International

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Funk - Released June 23, 2017 | Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Best New Reissue
This draped in light rerelease of Purple Rain is an opportunity to take a beautiful trip back in time… For Prince, the 1999 advent coincides with several disputes with his entourage. The pinnacle is reached when the guitarist Dez Dickerson leaves, soon replaced by Wendy Melvoin. The star goes back to work and mulls over a project even crazier than a double album: a quasi-autobiographical movie! With their head on the chopping block, his managers are tasked with finding a film without delay. Warner’s movie division is rather lukewarm and wants warranties. Prince and his ever growing family (The Revolution, The Time, Vanity 6) perform regularly at the First Avenue club and spend the rest of their time locked away in a gigantic warehouse rehearsing and taking drama and dance classes to prepare for the movie. Prince even transferred his own studio in this warehouse to record the soundtrack of his crazy project. He also sets up a mobile studio in front of the First Avenue, where he makes live recordings of other songs. In the end, Warner Studios pay up for what will probably be one of the worst movies they’ve produced so far, a dud that will however give an exuberant and awesome soundtrack: Purple Rain reaches the top of the R&B and Pop charts. Let's Go Crazy, When Doves Cry, Take Me With U, Purple Rain and I Would Die 4 U are all Princely hits that will dominate the airwaves in 1984 and 1985. His decadent funk rock and his frilled-shirted pimp style seduce the entire planet. Once again, the musician manages to mix his different foibles like a new Sly Stone. Containing pop melodies reminding of the Beatles and Hendrixian guitars with a funk groove rhythm, Purple Rain offers above all a complete revamping of these fundamentals of music… This Purple Rain Deluxe – Expanded Edition includes the remastered original album (the remastering was made in Paisley Park in 2015 with the original master tapes, and Prince supervised the whole process a few months before his passing), as well as eleven new titles, but also all the edit versions of the singles and their B sides. Taken from Prince’s numerous unreleased archives, the new tracks are true gems, like the 1983 instrumental version of Father’s Song. Some of them, like the studio version of Electric Intercourse, never even got out of Paisley Park before! Those gems have been mastered by Bernie Grundman, who worked on the original album. © MD/Qobuz
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Funk - Released June 23, 2017 | Warner Records

This draped in light rerelease of Purple Rain is an opportunity to take a beautiful trip back in time… For Prince, the 1999 advent coincides with several disputes with his entourage. The pinnacle is reached when the guitarist Dez Dickerson leaves, soon replaced by Wendy Melvoin. The star goes back to work and mulls over a project even crazier than a double album: a quasi-autobiographical movie! With their head on the chopping block, his managers are tasked with finding a film without delay. Warner’s movie division is rather lukewarm and wants warranties. Prince and his ever growing family (The Revolution, The Time, Vanity 6) perform regularly at the First Avenue club and spend the rest of their time locked away in a gigantic warehouse rehearsing and taking drama and dance classes to prepare for the movie. Prince even transferred his own studio in this warehouse to record the soundtrack of his crazy project. He also sets up a mobile studio in front of the First Avenue, where he makes live recordings of other songs. In the end, Warner Studios pay up for what will probably be one of the worst movies they’ve produced so far, a dud that will however give an exuberant and awesome soundtrack: Purple Rain reaches the top of the R&B and Pop charts. Let's Go Crazy, When Doves Cry, Take Me With U, Purple Rain and I Would Die 4 U are all Princely hits that will dominate the airwaves in 1984 and 1985. His decadent funk rock and his frilled-shirted pimp style seduce the entire planet. Once again, the musician manages to mix his different foibles like a new Sly Stone. Containing pop melodies reminding of the Beatles and Hendrixian guitars with a funk groove rhythm, Purple Rain offers above all a complete revamping of these fundamentals of music… This Purple Rain Deluxe – Expanded Edition includes the remastered original album (the remastering was made in Paisley Park in 2015 with the original master tapes, and Prince supervised the whole process a few months before his passing), as well as eleven new titles, but also all the edit versions of the singles and their B sides. Taken from Prince’s numerous unreleased archives, the new tracks are true gems, like the 1983 instrumental version of Father’s Song. Some of them, like the studio version of Electric Intercourse, never even got out of Paisley Park before! Those gems have been mastered by Bernie Grundman, who worked on the original album. © MD/Qobuz
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Funk - Released January 1, 1989 | Universal Records

A double-CD retrospective of 1956-1964 recordings that charts Brown's progress from doo wop and Little Richard-influenced R&B to the verge of his groundbreaking mid-'60s funk. It doesn't include his biggest hits of the era (which are found on Star Time), but these are by and large equally exciting. Many fine overlooked R&B hits and B-sides are included like "Shout and Shimmy," "I've Got Money," the gospel-influenced "Oh Baby Don't You Weep," and "Maybe the Last Time," which inspired the Rolling Stones' "The Last Time." © Richie Unterberger /TiVo

Funk - Released December 4, 2019 | Fonktastic

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Funk - Released December 20, 2019 | PornoStar Comps

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Funk - Released December 23, 2019 | PornoStar Comps

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Funk - Released November 15, 2019 | Creative Wind Studios

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Funk - Released December 1, 2017 | Marcelo Gaúcho

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Funk - Released December 25, 2020 | Seanpenalber

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Funk - To be released July 16, 2021 | How Do You Are?

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