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Cello Concertos - Released June 28, 2021 | Milada Gajdova

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Cello Concertos - Released April 5, 2019 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Cello Concertos - Released February 15, 2019 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This concerto begins with a march that is reminiscent of the first act of Beethoven’s Fidelio, which announces the arrival of the sinister character Pizarro - a jest that in turn sets the scene for the soloist's arrival on Jacques Offenbach’s Grand Concerto for Cello in G Major. The piece was tackled by Jérôme Pernoo in 2009 for Archiv Produktion. Twenty-two years his junior, it is the talented Edgar Moreau recording this work here; composed in Paris in 1847, the concerto is presented in a meticulous reconstruction by Jean-Christophe Keck, the undisputed specialist of the German composer. It’s a challenging work for the soloist, testing both virtuosity and stamina with a staggering duration of over forty minutes. Born before his time, the pianist Friedrich Gulda was an expert in musical hybridization, viewing classical music as too constraining. Being open to jazz and all other kinds of music, he wrote a concerto (one of the highlights on this record) for the cellist Heinrich Schiff in 1980. Composed for a varied ensemble of musicians, it mixes a big band with a classical orchestra, using an amp to accentuate the cello's quiet voice. The result is a perplexing score that fuses jazz, waltz (let's not forget that Gulda is Viennese), Ländler and a peaceful “Ranz des Vaches” – traditional melodies played in the Swiss Alps by herdsmen driving cattle. This is a deliciously iconoclastic record that’s as hair-raising as Edgar Moreau's messy locks and the cellist tackles the work with a beautifully playful approach. He is the youngest of a large group of French cellists working today who are perpetuating the appeal of this instrument that has been hugely popular in the western world since replacing the viola da gamba. The carefully selected musicians from the ensemble Les Forces Majeures are conducted with precision and humour by Raphaël Merlin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released November 30, 2018 | Sony Classical - Sony Music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Diapason d'or / Arte - Le Choix de France Musique
Cellist Sol Gabetta and her almost-favourite pianist, Bertrand Chamayou, focus here on Schumann's all too rare repertoire for cello and piano. And once again, none of these pieces are intended a priori for cello, even though the original scores do propose the instrument as a possible alternative to the clarinet in Fantasy Pieces or the horn in Adagio and Allegro. It was only with Five Pieces in Folk Style that Schumann immediately thought of the cello! Here, Chamayou plays on a Viennese fortepiano by Streicher, dated from 1847 - three or four years after the composition of these three works. The Concerto for cello is accompanied by the Basel Chamber Orchestra, who also play on instruments from the romantic era, giving a more hushed yet incisive sound for the attacks. There’s more of an emphasis on the woodwind section as well, in contrast to the over-inflated string ensemble that so many modern orchestras offer up. © SM/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released November 30, 2018 | Sony Classical - Sony Music

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
Cellist Sol Gabetta and her almost-favourite pianist, Bertrand Chamayou, focus here on Schumann's all too rare repertoire for cello and piano. And once again, none of these pieces are intended a priori for cello, even though the original scores do propose the instrument as a possible alternative to the clarinet in Fantasy Pieces or the horn in Adagio and Allegro. It was only with Five Pieces in Folk Style that Schumann immediately thought of the cello! Here, Chamayou plays on a Viennese fortepiano by Streicher, dated from 1847 - three or four years after the composition of these three works. The Concerto for cello is accompanied by the Basel Chamber Orchestra, who also play on instruments from the romantic era, giving a more hushed yet incisive sound for the attacks. There’s more of an emphasis on the woodwind section as well, in contrast to the over-inflated string ensemble that so many modern orchestras offer up. © SM/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released November 2, 2018 | Northern Flowers

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Cello Concertos - Released November 2, 2018 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Exceptional Sound Recording - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Lutosławski's Cello Concerto and Dutilleux’s Tout un monde lointain (also a cello concerto) are linked by their unique destinies. Both were led by Rostropovitch; both were started in 1967 and both were created by the patron in 1970. Both were performed "in the West": one in London, the other in Aix-en-Provence; and that's when things started to unravel for Rostropovich, who fell out of favour with Brezhnev's regime in the USSR. When the soloist left the USSR for good in 1974, Lutosławski's Concerto suffered the same fate in the East and was hardly played there for a long time. While the two works are perfectly contemporary, and the two composers as well, the difference between them couldn't be greater. Whilst Lutosławski's Concerto seems to describe chaos, with a soloist part that resembles a Don Quixote battling against an orchestra, Tout un monde lointain bathes in a fantastical light, where the cello is primus inter pares with the orchestra. Two visions, both so different, defended here with the same ardour by cellist Johannes Moser, who has worked on them and played them many times over, and his experience has produced a recording where every inflection is carefully chosen. © SM/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released November 2, 2018 | Myrios Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
Two “Soviet” concertos for cello and orchestra, both written in 1966, that is the idea behind this recording of cellist Maximilian Hornung. Of course, the most famous of the two is and remains Shostakovich's Second Concerto, written for and premiered by Rostropovich. Less famous, except perhaps in Georgia, is the Georgian composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze (1925-1991), himself a renowned virtuoso cellist, who composed an impressive number of chamber music, concertos, symphonies, operas, oratorios, completely ignored by the rest of the world, what a pity. Tsintsadze, as might be thought from a "regional" Soviet composer, often borrows from the folklore of his country, but this is in no way a limitation or a specialization, no more than the way Khatchaturian would sometimes borrow from Armenia. Here is his Concerto No. 2 in five episodes, in which Tsintsadze is certainly quite indebted to Shostakovich, but also to Prokofiev undoubtedly, even to Khatchaturian here and there. The instrumental language is both brilliant and idiomatic. The contrast between his concerto and that of Shostakovich – keeping in mind that they both date from the same year – is striking. The cellist Maximilian Hornung has already performed as a soloist with the Bavarian Radio Orchestra, the Tonhalle Zurich, the London Philharmonic, the Orchestre National de France, the London Philharmonia; in short, many of the most prestigious orchestras in the world. © SM/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released October 5, 2018 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Cello Concertos - Released July 6, 2018 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Born in 1911 and 1903 respectively, these German composers – who were, unfortunately for them, born Jewish – Franz Reizenstein and Berthold Goldschmidt were exiled from Germany in 1934 and 1935, but their stories were very different. From 1932 Goldschmidt had made a serious name for himself following the performance of one of his operas in Mannheim. But he was already 29 and had some serious musical and social baggage behind him, not only in the form of a job assisting Erich Kleiber at the Berlin production of Wozzeck. So when he came to Britain, he was already well-regarded. But the unfortunate Reizenstein was only 21 when he came to London, where he wanted to continue the studies he had started with Hindemith in Berlin... Happily for him, he found a space under the benevolent wing of Vaughan Williams, and eventually took English nationality and even became a teacher in the Royal College of Music. As for Goldschmidt, who was already famous and whose opera The Magnificent Cuckold was to have been first performed in 1933 – an ill-fated year – he found himself classed as a "degenerate artist", which prompted his departure shortly after. Neither of the two composers would give into the atonal, serialist Schönbergian torrent, let alone the post-war avant-garde: and so their music was soon thought of as old hat... Goldschmidt even quit composing in 1958, and didn't return to it until the end of his life, once the serialist dictatorship had fallen amid much derision. The two cello concertos supplied here by the great Raphael Wallfisch were written and performed in the 1950s, and then largely forgotten for decades, in spite of the support of the equally-great Feuermann. Here, we find a language which is at once classical and modern, in the tradition of Hindemith and Vaughan Williams, and surely Shostakovitch too – these are works that richly deserve a rediscovery. Unlike the Reizenstein concerto, the Goldschmidt one is not a world premiere. © SM/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released May 18, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
After two albums which met with unanimous critical acclaim all over the world, the Resonanz Ensemble, based in Hamburg, is offering a recording dedicated to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: the Cello Concertos wq. 170 and Wq. 172, respectively from 1750 and 1753, and the Symphonie Wq. 173 of 1741. The listener will immediately note the radical difference in language between the two concertos, written after the death of Bach Senior, and the Symphony, written while he was still alive: the concertos keep their eyes firmly fixed on the nascent classical era, including the "Sturm und Drang" which still lay ahead (in this regard, the Concerto in A Minor which opens the album, full of force and melodic power, is an excellent example), whereas the Symphony takes the final throes of baroque as its point of departure. Cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras and the Resonanz Ensemble offer a crystal-clear reading, conducted by their new musical director in residence, violinist Riccardo Minasi: and coolly resist the vogue – which can be quite intrusive, or even dictatorial or exclusive – for period instruments, which seems to hold that any music before Mozart (and even sometimes Mozart too) may not be played on modern instruments. Queyras, Resonanz and Minasi are all able to make use of stylistic elements gleaned from the fashion for baroque. This is a very fine album, superbly played, which really brings out all the originality of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach. © SM/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released March 16, 2018 | Claves Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
French cellist Astrig Siranossian, a graduate of the Lyon CNSM and then of the prestigious Basel Hochschule went on to win First Prize and special prizes in the Krzysztof Penderecki competition: so it should come as no surprise that for this first solo album she has chosen a programme that brings together both the Second Concerto by Penderecki, written in 1982 and dedicated to Rostropovitch, and Khatchatourian's Concerto – Khatchatourian was Armenian, and it will not have escaped readers' notice that Siranossian is also an Armenian name. The young soloist is proving much sought-after: most notably, she has been invited to spend the next season with Daniel Barenboim at the new Pierre Boulez Hall in Berlin under the direction of Zubin Mehta, Simon Rattle and Antonio Pappano. Her musical partners include Yo-Yo Ma, Daniel Barenboim, Sol Gabetta, Bertrand Chamayou and Daniel Ottensamer, and she has graced stages as diverse as the Paris Philharmonic, the Vienna Musikverein the Salle Flagey in Brussels, the Buenos Aires Teatro Cólon the Kennedy Center in Washington… Note also that since 2015, she has been the artist in residence at the Queen Elizabeth Music Chapel in Belgium. This is a most promising musician whose career is one to watch closely. © SM/Qobuz
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Cello Concertos - Released January 11, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
French cellist Gautier Capuçon does not lack for charisma (or talent), and he has emerged as a major star. The Erato label seems to have tried to capitalize on that with the design of this album, featuring photos by the American Jamie Beck that cast Capuçon as a kind of Byronic figure. It may be a bit over the top, but classical music needs stars. The contents of the album, however, may not quite live up to the heroic concept. They consist of live performances recorded between 2009 and 2015, not of new material. Schumann wrote more music for cello than other composers did, and assembling them in a single program may have made sense. But the sound universes of the Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129, and the various chamber pieces are entirely different. The major attraction here is the concerto, a work that has been revaluated upward in recent years as performers have clarified its knotty lines. Historically oriented performance works well with Schumann, and there is a historical reading by Argentine cellist Sol Gabetta with the Kammerorchester Basel. But Capuçon offers a fine modern-instrument option, and an important contributor to its success is octogenarian conductor Bernard Haitink, leading the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Sample the precise interplay between Capuçon and Haitink in the first movement, which makes the music seem to unfold inevitably. The concerto never drags, and Capuçon sounds gorgeous. The chamber works were recorded at the Verbier Festival in Switzerland with pianist Martha Argerich, and, in the case of the Fantasiestücke, Op. 88, Capuçon's brother Renaud on violin. Despite the august collaborators, these readings feature differing approaches from the principals and don't quite jell, either interpretively or sonically. Nevertheless, this is an album Capuçon's fans will want, and the reading of the concerto is an important addition to its growing discography. © TiVo
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Cello Concertos - Released June 30, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Any number of recordings on the market of Dvorak's Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, make good choices: it's a beloved repertory work, and it is the lifetime chance for any cellist to shine. Nevertheless, there's a strong case for choosing this one by the respectably well-known, but not a household-name, French cellist Marc Coppey and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin under Kirill Karabits. First is the unusual pairing with Ernest Bloch's Schelomo, another prominent repertory work for the cello. As Coppey points out in his notes, both works were connected with the U.S.; Bloch's work was written before he moved to the country permanently, while Dvorak's concerto was written in the U.S. as the composer prepared to return home. Both are reflections on ethnicity, and they fit well together in unexpected ways. Dvorak's short tone poem Klid (Silent Woods) is a pleasant entr'acte. But the prime attraction is the Dvorak concerto itself: Coppey offers a full-blooded, passionate reading that may put the listener in mind of classic Czech performances by Janos Starker, for example. Sample the finale, where the maximum intensity is squeezed out of the rhapsodic ending. It's a virtuoso performance with fine coordination between orchestra and soloist. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Cello Concertos - Released March 30, 2016 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording
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Cello Concertos - Released January 15, 2016 | audite Musikproduktion

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Cello Concertos - Released April 24, 2004 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Cello Concertos - Released March 24, 2014 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
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Cello Concertos - Released March 24, 2014 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
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Cello Concertos - Released January 24, 2014 | Sony Classical

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica