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Keyboard Concertos - Released March 1, 2019 | Myrios Classics

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Keyboard Concertos - Released February 1, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 3, 2019 | BIS

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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 12, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
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Keyboard Concertos - Released September 7, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica

Keyboard Concertos - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Keyboard Concertos - Released June 15, 2018 | Profil

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Keyboard Concertos - Released June 8, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Keyboard Concertos - Released April 20, 2018 | Supraphon a.s.

Distinctions 5 de Diapason

Keyboard Concertos - Released March 2, 2018 | Ondine

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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This is the final volume in a Beethoven concerto cycle by German pianist Lars Vogt that has been generally acclaimed for its freshness and detail. Vogt both plays and conducts the Royal Northern Sinfonia, of which he is music director, and the result has been interpretations in which pianist and orchestra achieve an unusual kind of sync. The results are spectacular in the Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, where Vogt eases into each movement, as it were, letting details accrete and add power. Sample the final movement, where the orchestra begins at a very low dynamic level, and Vogt weaves piano and orchestra together convincingly as the music proceeds. The first two movements open in circumspect ways but, as they develop, reveal Beethoven the virtuoso as Viennese audiences must have experienced him; note especially the curious clipped treatment of the second movement's orchestral theme, so different from the stomping giant favored by most conductors. The final diminished fifth comes out in sharp, chilling relief here. Vogt's approach is a bit less successful in the early Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 19, where the syncopations ring and rock, but the basic Mozartian shapes of the themes are indistinct. Nevertheless, Vogt's Beethoven recordings are major statements, and this album is no exception.
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Keyboard Concertos - Released February 23, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles de Classica
For his first album with Sony Classical, Adam Laloum returns to one of his favourite composers. He distinguished himself with his first recording in 2011, for Mirare, which contained four of the composer's major works: Variations on an original theme Op. 21 No. 1, the wonderful and too-little-played Klavierstücke from Op. 76, the two Rhapsodies Op. 79 and the 3 Intermezzi Op. 117. And so it is hardly a surprise that today he is offering up his vision of Brahms's Concertos. Sony Classical has marshalled its formidable resources: one of the best orchestras in Germany, the Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin; and one of the young wolves of orchestral conducting from Asia (but already well-known in Europe - witness his many collaborations with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande for Pentatone) join them twice, once in August, then in October 2016, in the Radio Berlin Großer Sendesaal, for sessions which must have been a childhood dream come true for the young Frenchman. An amazing experience! © 2018 Théodore Grantet/Qobuz
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Keyboard Concertos - Released February 2, 2018 | Piano Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Indeed, Sergei Bortkiewicz’ (1877-1952) works are rarely to be found on record: welcome to a new album with the last two of his piano concertos, played by Romanian pianist Stefan Doniga. Bortkiewicz was born in Ukraine, and received his musical training in St Petersburg from Liadov. In 1900 he continued his study at the Leipzig Conservatory. From 1904 until 1914, he lived in Berlin where he started his career as a composer. A piano concerto opus 1 was premiered in Berlin in 1906 but later destroyed by the composer. At the outbreak of the First World War he was forced to leave Germany, and returned to Kharkov but with the end of the war came new horrors, with the Russian civil war. In 1920 he had to flee to Turkey but despite the good living conditions there, Bortkiewicz pined for Central Europe – it would be Austria as from 1922. That same year he was commissioned by the famous one-armed pianist Paul Wittgenstein to write a Piano Concerto for the left hand. As part of the deal he had to grant Wittgenstein exclusive rights of performance during the pianist’s lifetime. Because of this stipulation, Bortkiewicz’ concerto was never published and fell into oblivion after the deaths of Bortkiewicz in 1952 and Wittgenstein in 1961. In Vienna, where he had eventually obtained Austrian citizenship, Bortkiewicz composed his Piano Concerto no. 3 opus 32 “Per aspera ad astra” – ‘through resistance into light’. The melodic gifts, the instrumentation and the different functions of the piano reflect the solid workmanship of Bortkiewicz, embodied with that same pathos as the concertos of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Scriabin and Medtner. Bortkowicz had an aversion for what he called modern, atonal and cacophonous music: his work reflects little innovation compared to many of his contemporary composers, he covered no new ground, but built on the structures and sounds of Chopin and Liszt, with the unmistakable influences of early Scriabin and Rachmaninov. With unerring flair and a huge talent! © SM/Qobuz

Keyboard Concertos - Released February 2, 2018 | LPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 26, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik
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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 26, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Boris Berezovsky is one of these indomitable pianists who won’t restrict themselves to a set script, but rather let their instinct guide them. So plastic perfection is not the motto here. As shown by this new recording with one of the best Russian ensembles, the Svetlanov Symphony Orchestra. The concert’s programme, recorded live on April 8th, 2017, is very rich, combining Brahms’ Piano Concert No. 1 – with dimensions much more symphonic than simple concertantes – with a rarely performed partition: Stravinsky’s Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments. Berezovsky rightly assumes that live recordings are much more exciting than in the studio. Concerts taping, despite their inherent flaws – false notes, blunders, coughing, etc. − mirror life itself and manage to capture the energy flows between the stage and the audience. The pianist doesn’t confine himself to playing his instrument: in fact, he’s also conducting from the piano! “I wanted to approach works for piano and orchestra as if they were chamber music on a large scale; these two works share this chamber quality” he explains. A rather monumental experience for a most intriguing musical result. © SM/Qobuz

Keyboard Concertos - Released October 1, 2017 | Aeolus

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 5, 2018 | APR

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Keyboard Concertos - Released December 29, 2017 | AAO Music

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Keyboard Concertos - Released November 10, 2017 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 20, 2017 | Mariinsky

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica