Albums

1491 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
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Classical - Released April 3, 2013 | Piano Classics

Booklet
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Jazz - Released November 30, 2018 | Cam Jazz

Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Solo Piano - Released November 30, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
Through his “brilliance and maturity” (as described by The Guardian) the Russian-Lithuanian pianist Lukas Geniušas has established himself on the international scene as one of the most interesting artists of his generation. He has appeared in London's Wigmore Hall, Amsterdam's Concertgebouw, Milan's Salle Verdi, Moscow's Conservatory and Roque d'Anthéron, and with orchestras such as the Philharmonique de Radio France, the National de Lyon, the NHK of Tokyo, the Saint Petersburg Philharmonic, the Russian National Orchestra, the list goes on... He has chosen here a Prokofiev programme combining early works from his younger years (the Ten Pieces Op. 12 which is a junior work and yet so intimately prokofievian already!) with the work from his first stage of maturity (Second Sonata from 1912) and the work from his full maturity (the Fifth Sonata). Even better, this Fifth Sonata was written "for the first time" in 1923 after his time in Paris, then revised three decades later under the constraint, undoubtedly, of the infamous Jdanov decree which had accused the composer of all anti-Soviet evils, but also due to a very personal concern (he wanted to purify the piano gesture). In a way this work seems almost "Parisian" as it has so many similarities with Poulenc's style. © SM/Qobuz
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released October 26, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Two composers who in one way or another sang about the horrors of war, and two who lost their lives in it: Ian Bostridge's takes a successful gamble here, with masterful accompaniment on the piano by Antonio Pappano. The first two are from Kurt Weill with Four Walt Whitman Songs in which the poet laments over the soldiers who died in the War of Succession, and Gustav Mahler, three of whose Lieder(s) taken from Knaben Wunderhorn cruelly and repugnantly evoke the lives of poor young people, peasants and people who are barely through with their school years, sent to be torn apart on every possible and imaginable front. More directly concerned, if one may say so, are George Butterworth - who fell at the Somme in 1916, aged thirty-one, and whose A Shropshire Lad is without a doubt the greatest masterpiece here. Rudi Stephan fell at the Galician front in 1915 aged twenty-eight. His cycle Ich will dir singen ein Hohelied is a climax of unsettling eroticism... Would the fate of German music have been different if this genius had been able to act as a counterbalance, for example, to the emerging dodecaphonic music? Bostridge gives it his all here in this sad centenary of the end of the “war to end all wars”, which we know was tragically not the case. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | HORTUS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Cello Concertos - Released October 25, 2018 | Myrios Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released October 19, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Opera - Released October 19, 2018 | Supraphon a.s.

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or
What men live by? described by Martinu as a pastoral-opera was written in 1951-1952 in the United States, to an English libretto by the composer after the short story by Leo Tolstoy "Where Love is, there God is also" (1885), and premiered as a television broadcast in New York in May 1953. The first staged performance took place on July 31, 1954, in Interlochen, Michigan. Today we owe Belohlavek and the Czech Philharmonic orchestra this first discographic recording. Here is the argument: devastated by the pain of the loss of his wife and children, Martin Avdeitch, cobbler by trade, is comforted in the reading of the Bible. During a dream, he sees Jesus who promises him to visit him the next day. While waiting for this meeting, the man helps a poor mother with her child, offers a tea to a soldier, takes the defense of a child whom his grandmother denounces as a thief. In the evening, he hears again the voice of Jesus who says to him: "Did you not recognize me?" « [...] the composer wants more joy than preaching: "you have to sing it like a popular song, without pathos." Jiri Belohlavek does not betray his will. Well helped by Lukas Vasilek's luminous Martinu Voices and a Czech Philharmonic which in the Great Hall of Rudolfinum perfectly adapts to the dimensions of this intimate theater, he paints a lively and superbly imagined miniature. Entirely Czech-speaking, the voices color English with inflections that add to the cachet of this first recording. Nothing to say about the performance of Ivan Kusnjer, always able to find the appropriate expressive register. [...] Belohlavek adorns the Symphony No. 1 (1942) with new finery, after a first engraving under a stormy sky (Chandos) and an English remake full of a luminous interiority (Onyx). [...] » (Diapason, January 2019 / Nicolas Derny). Disappeared in 2017, the Czech conductor will not have had time to record his new version of the Martinu complete symphonies. © Qobuz

Symphonic Music - Released October 5, 2018 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
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Sir Andrew Davis returns to his exploration of Holst’s orchestral works with the brilliant BBC Philharmonic, a series initiated almost ten years ago by the late Richard Hickox, then taken over by another expert in British repertoire. This selection of orchestral works by Holst provides a remarkable overview of his career, ranging from such early works as A Winder Idyll – composed in 1897 when he was still studying at the Royal College of Music – to the Scherzo of a symphony on which he was working towards the end of his life. None of the music recorded here was published in his lifetime, and the Scherzo – rarely heard though it is – is the only work to have entered the repertoire. A Moorside Suite, originally written for brass band, is featured here in the composer's rarely heard arrangement for strings. The young British cellist Guy Johnston is the soloist in Invocation, one of Holst’s most significant works, calling for a subtle balance of virtuosity and expressive qualities. © Chandos

Quartets - Released October 5, 2018 | Chandos

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 étoiles de Classica
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For its very first recording on Chandos, the Arcadia String Quartet presents what has been at the very heart of its musical career and influences: the complete string quartets by Bartók. With the music of the Hungarian composer, the members of this Romanian ensemble, neighbours of his birthplace, have won such major careershaping competitions as Osaka, the Wigmore Hall, and Hamburg. Bartók’s attachment to the string quartet – as to no other genre – was to the keystone of the Viennese tradition, but with the aim of moving the medium out of its native city a little, into the countryside of alternative tonalities and rhythms. The six mature works he wrote are being revealed here with all the singular patterns, mixed modalities, bitterness, lamentations, and, at times, bright folk influences which they contain. © Chandos
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Solo Piano - Released October 5, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
A century after his death on 25 March 1918, many harmonia mundi artists are eager to pay tribute to Claude Debussy, the magician of melody and timbre, the great 'colourist' and father of modern music. After Rachmaninoff's Preludes, Nikolai Lugansky wanted to present a finely nuanced portrait of this composer so fond of travelling! Whether it ranges over time (Hommage à Haydn) or the most vividly imagined open spaces, this freely composed programme is concerned above all with light and colour, in works we can never tire of. © harmonia mundi
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Chamber Music - Released October 5, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Symphonies - Released October 5, 2018 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Composed against a cataclysmic backdrop of Stalinist oppression and the Second World War, Shostakovich's Eighth Symphony is a deeply affecting poem of suffering. The composer described it as 'an attempt to reflect the terrible tragedy of war', and it contains some of the most terrifying music he ever wrote. Here, Gianandrea Noseda conducts the London Symphony Orchestra with intensity and understanding, allowing the music to tell its own story as it travels from darkness into light, yearning more for peace than for victory. One of the leading conductors of his generation, Gianandrea Noseda holds several high-profile international positions in addition to his role as Principal Guest Conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra, including Music Director of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC. His previous releases on LSO Live include acclaimed interpretations of the Verdi Requiem and Britten War Requiem, and this recording follows the digital release of Shostakovich: Symphony No 5, which will receive a full release in October 2019 coupled with the composer's First Symphony. © harmonia mundi
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Solo Piano - Released September 28, 2018 | ARTALINNA

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
Considered as one of the most inspired pianists of his generation, Severin von Eckardstein explores three major cycles of French music from the 1900s, associating Claude Debussy’s two revolutionary books Images (1904-1907) and Gabriel Dupont’s La Maison dans les dunes (1907-1909) as part of this debut album under the Artalinna label: this suite of 10 pieces with memorable atmospheres filled with luminous colours and heady melodies will stand out for many as a musical revelation! © Artalinna
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Chamber Music - Released September 28, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The Borodin Quartet has been graced by range of  Soviet and then Russian soloists since its creation in 1945 – when it was started by Rudolf Barshai and Rostropovich. The cellist who promptly replaced Rostropovich when the latter's career took off remained in post from 1946 to 2007, which is surely a record. During this time, while some left for "the West", and others had health problems, of which none died, Borodin's spirit continued to reign over the ensemble. Today, the quartet is still plugging away with its impressive international career, here is their most recent recording, produced between 2015 and 2018, it is made up of fifteen quartet compositions by Shostakovich. The Borodin Quartet has always had an excellent rapport with Shostakovich, to the point of playing all his work as it was composed. From his first string quartet piece in 1938 to the end of his life in 1974, it was in string quartet format that Shostakovich really laid his soul bare. Even the most perfidious of Communist officials were unable to find any kind of political allusion in this music... The Borodin Quartet supplement their programme with various other pieces, such as the superb Quintet with Piano and music from the film Girl Friends, made up of 23 pieces of which seven were written for string quartet (performed here), some with piano and trumpet and some with other extraordinary sonary innovations. It is an album of great beauty, and a must-buy for any Shostakovichophiles. © SM/Qobuz
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Choirs (sacred) - Released September 21, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Symphonic Music - Released September 18, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet
"One of the biggest dilemmas of our generation is where are we from, who are we, what is our identity? Globalization has made the whole world closer, bringing our cultures more and more together. I myself am a product of this mix, being born in Mexico to Russian parents with a Jewish background, having studied at a French school in Norway and grown up in Holland. Consequently I have often thought about these questions: which culture is closest to me? What am I? I could feel at home and relate to all these cultures and yet I am not really part of any of them. The music on this album explores the opposite perspective; each piece is very strong influenced by the composer’s culture. One can immediately smell the Hungarian landscape in Bartok’s Viola Concerto, Italian roots in the Carnevale di Venezia, the Jewish soul in Bloch’s Nigun and Russian Orthodox chants in Kugel’s Preghiera. However there is a deeper meaning to the title of this album, as the programme also touches the spiritual and carnal nature of the human being. During the process of compiling this programme I suddenly realized the strong religious connection between the second movement of the Bartok concerto and the two prayers that follow. This is followed by the contrasting ‘danse macabre’ in the third movement, which for me is very much associated with the carnal ritual of a carnival, when one is allowed to release one’s most primitive instincts. I believe each of these pieces explores the deepest roots of humankind, that core that will be there, no matter where we go or what we do." (Dana Zemtsov) © Channel Classics

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released September 14, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released September 10, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio

Concertos - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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