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Symphonies - Released February 28, 2020 | deutsche harmonia mundi

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Concertos for wind instruments - Released November 22, 2019 | NoMadMusic

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After "Waiting for Clara", which focused on the music of Brahms and Schumann, this second album on NoMadMusic from the clarinetist Julien Hervé looks back another few years, to the apex of Classical style, with Mozart’s Quintet and Concerto. After discovering the instrument later in his life, Mozart fell entirely in love with it and dedicated these sublime pieces to it. This hedonistic, luminous programme, recorded live, offers us the opportunity to discover - or rediscover - two of the greatest masterpieces in the clarinet repertoire. © NoMadmusic
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Classical - Released March 22, 2019 | harmonia mundi

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Symphonies - Released September 7, 2018 | BR-Klassik

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This 2018 BR Klassik release by Herbert Blomstedt and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra appears to be yet another mainstream rendition of Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G minor and the Symphony No. 41 in C major, "Jupiter," but in this time of historically informed performances on period instruments, it's almost a novelty. In these live performances, Blomstedt doesn't make any overt attempts at following 18th century practices, nor does he scale down the ensemble to the size of a Classical orchestra, and the only aspects of historical interpretation that are obvious are the fairly brisk tempos and the taking of repeats, which are comparatively small concessions to authenticity. Beyond that, little separates Blomstedt's readings from many recordings from the mid-20th century, which predated the movement for early music scholarship, and listeners who grew up hearing Mozart played by modern symphony orchestras will take to this album readily. However, Blomstedt avoids the over-blending and bland homogeneity of many older performances and instead strives for distinctive tone colors, particularly in the woodwinds, and transparency of the counterpoint, which is essential in Mozart. Because so much attention is paid to conveying the music with absolute clarity, listeners from the traditionalist and revisionist camps can find much to appreciate in Blomstedt's meticulous and intensely focused performances. © TiVo
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Cello Concertos - Released May 18, 2018 | harmonia mundi

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After two albums which met with unanimous critical acclaim all over the world, the Resonanz Ensemble, based in Hamburg, is offering a recording dedicated to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: the Cello Concertos wq. 170 and Wq. 172, respectively from 1750 and 1753, and the Symphonie Wq. 173 of 1741. The listener will immediately note the radical difference in language between the two concertos, written after the death of Bach Senior, and the Symphony, written while he was still alive: the concertos keep their eyes firmly fixed on the nascent classical era, including the "Sturm und Drang" which still lay ahead (in this regard, the Concerto in A Minor which opens the album, full of force and melodic power, is an excellent example), whereas the Symphony takes the final throes of baroque as its point of departure. Cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras and the Resonanz Ensemble offer a crystal-clear reading, conducted by their new musical director in residence, violinist Riccardo Minasi: and coolly resist the vogue – which can be quite intrusive, or even dictatorial or exclusive – for period instruments, which seems to hold that any music before Mozart (and even sometimes Mozart too) may not be played on modern instruments. Queyras, Resonanz and Minasi are all able to make use of stylistic elements gleaned from the fashion for baroque. This is a very fine album, superbly played, which really brings out all the originality of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 17, 2017 | HORTUS

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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 6, 2017 | CAvi-music

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Solo Piano - Released September 8, 2017 | La Dolce Volta

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Quartets - Released July 7, 2017 | Coviello Classics

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Quartets - Released March 17, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

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Symphonies - Released February 7, 2017 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released January 13, 2017 | Alpha

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In spite of the immense success he enjoyed in his lifetime, Sigismund Neukomm (born in Salzburg in 1778, died in Paris in 1858 at the age of eighty) is practically forgotten nowadays. Yet he left a catalogue of nearly two thousand works, including fifty masses and a number of oratorios and motets. Neukomm spent twenty years in the service of Prince Talleyrand, who commissioned him to write a Requiem Mass in memory of Louis XVI, guillotined in Paris on 21 January 1793. This was the second mass of the fifty he was eventually to compose, several of which were dedicated to monarchs. The Requiem was given at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna on 21 January 1815 by more than three hundred singers divided into two choirs. Neukomm conducted one of them, while the other was directed by his friend Salieri. As part of their joint series of recordings, the Château de Versailles and Alpha continue their rediscovery of repertory that has marked the history of France and of music. Here Jean-Claude Malgoire conducts this unpublished Requiem. This is the first appearance in the Alpha catalogue of this pioneering figure from the golden age of the exploration of Baroque performing practice.
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Secular Vocal Music - Released January 6, 2017 | Orfeo

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Symphonic Music - Released November 6, 2015 | Coviello Classics

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Violin Concertos - Released February 3, 2015 | Haenssler Classic

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Classical - Released November 14, 2013 | Rondeau

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Symphonic Music - Released October 1, 2010 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released November 17, 2009 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released August 25, 2009 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released May 24, 2007 | Da Capo

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"Listeners prone to high blood pressure should consult their doctors first...." So says conductor Adam Fischer in the liner notes for Volume 5 of the Danish Radio Sinfonietta's cycle of the Mozart symphonies. An exaggeration? Perhaps. One of the cheesiest accolades ever given to someone's own work? Absolutely. Despite any risks to their cardiovascular systems, listeners are indeed treated to a lively and vivacious performance of these four early symphonies, written in 1772. The Danish Radio Sinfonietta, which plays on modern instruments, clearly favors brisk tempos. For the most part, this extra energy is very successful, especially in these earlier compositions that may lack some of the depth and profundity of the later symphonies. There are a few moments, however, when Fischer gets a little carried away, most notably in the Presto of K. 124, which is so aggressive and brusque that it's downright noisy. The rest of the album is more successful in finding an appropriate balance between dignity and excitement. The liner notes (apart from Fischer's own assessments of his own work) are of particular interest. Not only do they put the year 1772 in musical context, but they also go into enjoyable detail as to what was occurring in the rest of the world at the same time. If you think your heart can handle it, this album is certainly worth a look. © TiVo