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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

On his third date for Blue Note within a year, Wayne Shorter changed the bands that played on both Night Dreamer and Juju and came up with not only another winner, but also managed to give critics and jazz fans a different look at him as a saxophonist. Because of his previous associations with McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, and Reggie Workman on those recordings, Shorter had been unfairly branded with the "just-another-Coltrane-disciple" tag, despite his highly original and unusual compositions. Here, with only Jones remaining and his bandmates from the Miles Davis Quintet, Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter on board (with Freddie Hubbard filling out the horn section), Shorter at last came into his own and caused a major reappraisal of his earlier work. The odd harmonic frameworks used to erect "Fee-Fi-Fo-Fum," with its balladic structure augmented with a bluesy regimen of hard bop and open-toned modalism, create the illusion of a much larger band managing all that timbral space. Likewise on the title track, with its post-bop-oriented melodic line strewn across a wide chromatic palette of minors and Hancock's piano pushing through a contrapuntal set of semi-quavers, the avant-garde meets the hard bop of the '50s head on and everybody wins. The loping lyric of the horns and Hancock's vamping in the middle section during Shorter's solo reveals a broad sense of humor in the saxophonist's linguistics and a deep, more regimented sense of time and thematic coloration. The set ends with the beautiful "Wild Flower," a lilting ballad with angular accents by Hancock who takes the lyric and inverts it, finding a chromatic counterpoint that segues into the front line instead of playing in opposition. The swing is gentle but pronounced and full of Shorter's singular lyricism as a saxophonist as well as a composer. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Jazz - Released March 15, 2020 | Tapestry

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Jazz - Released July 31, 2020 | Decca (UMO)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1964 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Verve

Some of Shorter's most celebrated compositions comprise this set of live performances, recorded at various European venues in 2001. His all-star quartet shows a strong kinship with the group led by Miles Davis during Shorter's tenure in the mid-'60s. Its omission of a second horn, however, comes at the price of making it harder to fully explore the potential of these pieces. Shorter's writing, like his playing, is filled with harmonic implications, and though the artists he leads are without question giants of contemporary jazz, their performances don't fully illuminate this aspect of the material. Each follows a pointillistic approach; Perez, for example, plays extremely fluent chords, yet he tends to restrict them to sharp articulations, with few of the washier applications that Herbie Hancock would bring in similar settings. With Shorter playing, as usual, in spare statements, the improvisations he creates with his colleagues feel sharp and staccato. Of course, the musicians are also telepathic in their interplay, which is ultimately the point among Davis alumni and their disciples. They're even playful; try to catch that "Rock-A-Bye Baby" quote from Shorter in the title track. © Robert L. Doerschuk /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Verve

Wayne Shorter's debut for Verve was his first release as a leader in quite a long time and his most rewarding recording since the prime years of Weather Report, 15 years before. Shorter and keyboardist Rachel Z spent a year working on developing and orchestrating his ideas and the results are these nine originals. Although use was made of orchestral horns and strings, most of the backing in these often-dense ensembles is by a standard rhythm section (which includes Marcus Miller on electric bass and bass clarinet) and Rachel Z's synthesizers. The pieces set moods rather than state singable melodies, are not afraid to utilize electronic rhythms now and then in an unpredictable fashion, and are both intelligent and largely danceable. However, Shorter's playing (not only on soprano and tenor but a bit of alto and baritone) is always distinctive and he sounds very much as if he is pushing himself. In fact, his emotional statements and the complexity of the ensembles push this music way above virtually all of the so-called "contemporary jazz" (which is often merely a synonym for jazzy pop) into the idiom of creative music. It helps for listeners to have a liking for the sound of Weather Report (even though this group is not a copy), but even Shorter's older fans will find his playing here to be quite stimulating. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 17, 1985 | Columbia - Legacy

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Jazz - Released September 28, 2020 | naïve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Blue Note Records

Tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter's Blue Note debut found him well prepared to enter the big time. With an impressive quintet that includes trumpeter Lee Morgan, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Reggie Workman, and drummer Elvin Jones, Shorter performed a well-rounded program consisting of five of his originals, plus an adaptation of "Oriental Folk Song." Whether it be the brooding title cut, the Coltrane-ish ballad "Virgo," or the jams on "Black Nile" and "Charcoal Blues," this is a memorable set of high-quality and still fresh music. [Some reissues add an alternate take of "Virgo."] © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 17, 1988 | Columbia - Legacy

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Jazz - Released April 17, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

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Jazz - Released April 17, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Blue Note Records

Fulfilling the potential promised on his Blue Note debut, Night Dreamer, Wayne Shorter's JuJu was the first great showcase for both his performance and compositional gifts. Early in his career as a leader, Shorter was criticized as a mere acolyte of John Coltrane, and his use of Coltrane's rhythm section on his first two Blue Note albums only bolstered that criticism. The truth is, though, that Elvin Jones, Reggie Workman, and McCoy Tyner were the perfect musicians to back Shorter. Jones' playing at the time was almost otherworldly. He seemed to channel the music through him when improvising and emit the perfect structure to hold it together. Workman too seemed to almost instinctively understand how to embellish Shorter's compositions. McCoy Tyner's role as one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time was played here as well, and his light touch and beautiful, joyful improvisations would make him a much better match for Shorter than Herbie Hancock would later prove to be. What really shines on JuJu is the songwriting. From the African-influenced title track (with its short, hypnotic, repetitive phrases) to the mesmerizing interplay between Tyner and Shorter on "Mahjong," the album (which is all originals) blooms with ideas, pulling in a world of influences and releasing them again as a series of stunning, complete visions. © Stacia Proefrock /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 24, 1996 | Elektra Records