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Classical - Released January 12, 2010 | LSO Live

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Solo Piano - Released November 30, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
Through his “brilliance and maturity” (as described by The Guardian) the Russian-Lithuanian pianist Lukas Geniušas has established himself on the international scene as one of the most interesting artists of his generation. He has appeared in London's Wigmore Hall, Amsterdam's Concertgebouw, Milan's Salle Verdi, Moscow's Conservatory and Roque d'Anthéron, and with orchestras such as the Philharmonique de Radio France, the National de Lyon, the NHK of Tokyo, the Saint Petersburg Philharmonic, the Russian National Orchestra, the list goes on... He has chosen here a Prokofiev programme combining early works from his younger years (the Ten Pieces Op. 12 which is a junior work and yet so intimately prokofievian already!) with the work from his first stage of maturity (Second Sonata from 1912) and the work from his full maturity (the Fifth Sonata). Even better, this Fifth Sonata was written "for the first time" in 1923 after his time in Paris, then revised three decades later under the constraint, undoubtedly, of the infamous Jdanov decree which had accused the composer of all anti-Soviet evils, but also due to a very personal concern (he wanted to purify the piano gesture). In a way this work seems almost "Parisian" as it has so many similarities with Poulenc's style. © SM/Qobuz
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Ballets - Released March 9, 2018 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | Reference Recordings

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A man of his time, Prokofiev linked his name with Russian cinema. He worked with Eisenstein on the film Alexander Nevski in 1938. The two men inspired each other: some sequences were built around images, others, around music. This was a very singular set-up which made the original soundtrack more than just a dramatic enhancer, but a motor of the action in its own right. Prokofiev wrote a cantata for mezzo, mixed choir and orchestra in seven tableaux for the work. The orchestra, with its clever spacing of the deepest bass tones and the sharpest high notes, forges a space for the choir which is grandiose, and oftentimes unsettling. Prokofiev's musical language makes a modernist harmony of strained dissonances and themes with a folk feel. The musicians, choristers and instrumentalists all perform at a very high level of excellence. Led by Thierry Fisher, no stranger to repertoires that make use of imposing ensembles, they present a very fine version. Never falling into forced grandiloquence, they do justice to the work and all its historical and political resonances. The second, lighter part of this Prokofiev album centres on his first foray into cinema, in 1933. Alexander Feinzimmer's film, Lieutenant Kijé, tells of an imaginary lieutenant, who comes into being as a result of an administrative error. It was never performed, but Prokofiev turned his score into an orchestral suite. With an often- caustic humour, the suite moves between a series of evocative atmospheres. The careful foregrounding of the wind section creates a sonic parade of uniforms, fifes and horns, creating a stylised military world, in particular in the and third movements. The second movement presents a Romance in the form of variations on a theme. Double bass, bassoon, celesta and flute all join together in this nostalgic theme. A tour de force of writing, the finale brings together all the themes of the whole work into a single, poignant tableau, in which the Utah Symphony's ability to create a multiplicity of colours and soundscapes really allows them to shine. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released February 2, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Recording
In addition to Prokofiev’s two violin concertos – whose ample discography is brilliantly enriched by this interpretation of Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili and the excellent conductor Yannick Nézet-Seguin –, the album also features three treats from Prokofiev arranged by Tamás Batiashvili, the father of the aforementioned Lisa and a renowned teacher in his country. These are rewritings for solo violin and orchestra of the Dance Of The Knights from Romeo and Juliet, the Grand Waltz from Cinderella and the nefarious and quirky Grand March from The Love For Three Oranges. Batiashvili – the father – streamlines the message, allowing the solo violin to showcase its full power in moments that were bloated in the original partition, particularly in the rather bulky Dance Of The Knights which, losing some of its imposing weight, gained lyricism in return. As for the two concertos, they benefit greatly from the reasonably sized Chamber Orchestra of Europe, as it perfectly lets Prokofiev’s writing shine through. © SM/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released September 20, 2019 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
For his second album for the French label La Dolce Volta, following the magnificent “Album d'un voyageur” where he led us on a magnificent journey through Europe, travelling from Spain to Poland and exploring everything from the popular rhythms of Paul Ladmirault (Variations sur des airs de biniou) to Szymanowski’s Danses, here Florian Noack returns to Russian music - something which he has loved since his adolescence. Prokofiev has been haunting him since that age, when he watched the television broadcasts of the Queen Elisabeth Competition in 2003 and saw Prokofiev’s Second Concerto being performed by Severin von Eckardstein (who would later go on to win First Prize), marking a historic date in the history of the competition. With this new recording, Florian Noack composes a programme that alternates between relatively rare works (Tales of an old grandmother, Quatre Études, Op. 2) and more famous scores, in this case two absolute masterpieces of Prokofiev’s piano work. Composed between 1915 and 1917, the Visions fugitives form a catalogue of twenty short piano pieces inspired by the symbolist poet Constantin Balmont. The Belgian pianist’s interpretation is more tender and dreamy rather than sarcastic (Raekallio, Ondine 1989), worried (Gourari, ECM 2014, with her melancholic poignancy) or fierce (Mustonen, Decca). He concludes his recital with Piano Sonata No. 6, Op. 82, the first of the “war sonatas”, giving a performance with moderate but nevertheless firm contrasts. © Pierre- Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | harmonia mundi

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"This first volume in the complete cycle must already be given pride of place in the discography,” declared Classica magazine upon the release of Prokofiev’s Sonatas nos. 2, 6, and 8 (awarded a “Choc” in 2016). With this new volume, Alexandre Melnikov has chosen to delve into three distinct periods of the composer’s career, ranging from the dazzling though seldom-heard no. 4 to the magisterial no. 9. Inbetween those two, the sonata no. 7 once again evokes the troubled atmosphere characteristic of the three so-called “war sonatas.” Sviatoslav Richter claimed to have learned the piece in a mere four days! © harmonia mundi
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Solo Piano - Released February 22, 2019 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 2010 | Melodiya

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Solo Piano - Released September 27, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released February 15, 2019 | harmonia mundi

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2013 Cliburn Gold Medalist Vadym Kholodenko became the first-ever “Artistic Partner” with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra beginning in 2014/2015. He now concludes his complete cycle of Prokofiev piano concertos, which opened with Nos. 2 and 5. The three works heard here were composed over a span of two decades (1911 to 1930) and met with widely uneven reception, which ranged from the great popularity and critical acclaim in the case of No. 3 – to incomprehension and neglect, when it came to No. 4 (the ‘other’ concerto for the left hand alone). © harmonia mundi
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Chamber Music - Released January 15, 2010 | Supraphon a.s.

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Classical - Released November 30, 2018 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

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Classical - Released August 16, 2004 | Supraphon a.s.

Karel Ancerl dispatches Prokofiev's fearsome Alexander Nevsky Cantata with admirable speed and efficiency. While for some who admire the massive and monumental work, speed and efficiency might be the last thing one wants in a Nevsky, for those to whom the work has always seemed a little overblown, Ancerl's 1963 recording with the Czech Philharmonic will be just the thing. Because while no one could doubt the strength and energy of the performance, no one could accuse Ancerl of playing to the last row of the balcony. But as admirable as Ancerl's Nevsky is, his recording of Prokofiev's Symphony-Concerto is even better. Partnered with the superb and soulful André Navarra, Ancerl turns in a performance of nearly unmatched lyricism and power. Nearly unmatched because, of course, there is always the Rostropovich premiere recording that invariably must be regarded as all but definitive. But despite competition from the all but definitive, Navarra and Ancerl have a leaner and harder conception of the work and if their lyricism is not quite as expressive as Rostropovich's, their power is completely convincing. The remastered sound of Supraphon's stereo originals is warm and clear, but a bit distant.
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Classical - Released February 4, 2014 | Chandos

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Solo Piano - Released November 18, 2016 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
The Russian-British pianist Alexander Melnikov has recorded Shostakovich and a variety of Romantic chamber music with great success. But nothing quite prepares the listener for the controlled power in these performances of three Prokofiev piano sonatas. The Piano Sonata No. 6 in A major, Op. 82, and Piano Sonata No. 8 in B flat major, Op. 84, are among the most modernist works Prokofiev ever wrote. They appeared during World War II and are often thought, with some justification, to reflect that environment. And Prokofiev himself merely said blandly of the mighty Sonata No. 8 that it had a predominantly lyrical character. This is true enough of the themes themselves, but each one almost immediately becomes ensnared in technical complications that would be dizzying if they did not seem to be so controlled by an iron logic. And it is this structure, rather than shadows of war (which Shostakovich did better anyway, and which are made problematical by the fact that Prokofiev began writing both the Piano Sonata No. 6 and Piano Sonata No. 8 before the Soviet Union was invaded by Germany), that Melnikov captures so well. Sample one of the Vivace finales, perhaps that of the Piano Sonata No. 6 to hear the clean power of Melnikov's playing here, which indeed does carry a sense of threat. Added attractions include the exuberant Piano Sonata No. 2 in D minor, Op. 14, a student work, and superb Teldex Studio sound from Harmonia Mundi. A superior Prokofiev piano album.
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Classical - Released August 12, 2016 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonic Music - Released January 8, 2016 | Mariinsky

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This major release programmed to showcase some of Prokofiev's finest works launches in early 2016 the Mariinsky label's projects to honour the 125th anniversary of the composer’s birth, under the baton of maestro Valery Gergiev, a long-time champion of the music of Prokofiev. Acclaimed for his highly sensitive touch and technical brilliance, Alexei Volodin plays Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No 4 for the left hand, the only of Prokofiev's piano works that was not performed during his lifetime due to the following. Commissioned to Prokofiev by the Austrian one-armed pianist Paul Wittgenstein (amputated during the World War I) and written in 1930, this concerto was not appreciated by the dedicatee who refused to include it in his repertoire. It was not premiered in Berlin until September 1956, by the West Berlin RSO conducted by Martin Rich, but with another pianist, Siegfried Rapp (amputated too but during World War II). Alexei Volodin's performance was described as 'superbly controlled and beautifully subtle" by The Guardian. The American-Armenian musician Sergei Babyan performs Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No 5 premiered in Berlin in October 1932 by Prokofiev himself conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler. The Telegraph reviewer was sufficiently moved to write: "Never have I seen so many fast and furious hand-crossings, so many dizzying flights from top to bottom of the keyboard, all performed flawlessly". © Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released March 23, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Nestled up cosily with Sergei Babayan, gazing into the distance, rather like Juliet next to Romeo, Martha Argerich seems to have had an eye on marketing when she produced the "Prokofiev for Two" album cover for her longstanding publisher, Deutsche Grammophon. Although well-known, these works haven't yet been released in this format: each of the 19 pieces is an accomplished transcription by Sergei Babayan. More than half of this album is given over to extracts from the ballet Romeo and Juliet, originally a symphonic work, but one that sounds devilishly good when brought to life by these two exceptional pianists. The remainder of the album is made up of various pieces of stage music, from Hamlet, Eugene Onegin and the opera War and Peace. This is a reinvigorating album, with an eighty-year-old Martha Argerich who has lost none of her extraordinary technique. As for the Armenian pianist Sergei Babayan, a student of Mikhail Pletnev and a teacher of Daniil Trifonov, he seems to be having great fun with his own transcriptions alongside his long-time partner and friend. © François Hudry/Qobuz