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Classical - Released April 7, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Symphonies - Released May 10, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released December 22, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Don't be fooled: this youthful face belongs to an 18 year old violinist with a wealth of knowledge and a tried-and-tested technique. For proof, just look at his Bach record, which came out before this Tchaikovsky Concerto, also on Deutsche Grammophon. With every new outing, Daniel Lozakovich surrounds himself with famous formations: for Bach, the Bavarian Radio Chamber Orchestra; for Tchaikovsky, the Russian National Philharmonic under Vladimir Spivakov (himself a great violinist who conducted his first recital in 2010). This gutsy concerto is addressed by a musician with an ample, sparkling sound, capable of an intense virtuosity and a very tender melancholy. Alongside Spivakov, who also recorded this score, he is quite at home. The hands-on sound recording seeks out the fullness of lyricism here, without robbing the strings of their bite. Note that the young soloist learned his scales under Eduard Wulfson in Karlsruhe. This student of giants like Henryk Szeryng, Nathan Milstein and Yehudi Menuhin (no less) taught his young disciple the violin of the Russian school. This young artist's voracious curiosity did the rest. And so, the second part of his programme here offers passages where pure melancholy has been distilled into music, as in Lensky's aria from Eugene Onegin, an opera that the violinist adores and knows by heart. His performance is inspired by previous interpretations by Fritz Wunderlich and Ivan Kozlovsky. And no-one could deny it: Daniel Lozakovich's violin sings! © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 8, 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Symphonies - Released October 27, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month - Diapason d'or / Arte - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
An album, a symphony: you would think that we had returned to the days of the Long Play, and the era of Mravinsky, Doráti, Markevitch, Karajan as well as many other performers and interpreters who have marked the discographic history of the last symphony from Piotr Ilitch Tchaikovsky. The album cover also seems to confirm it: it brings to mind the old RCA covers from the 50s and 60s. Sony Classical, being very supportive of the artistic endeavours of the Greco-Russian master, didn't hesitate to bring out a roughly 45-minute album - they had done better with the Rites of Spring (2015), which was feted in the press. Here, Teodor Currentzis continues his exploration of Tchaikovsky's world, with the Pathétique, putting the accent on the dynamic contrasts, sometimes naturally, sometimes by technical means (adagio lamentoso), and bringing to bear some methods that are normally specific to pop music. He exploits the sombre tone of the work, even above its rhythmic energy, and looks to create atmospheres that one could often call morbid. For record-lovers, this release is a great opportunity to revisit his discography, and for all other ardent Qobuz users it is an opportunity to rediscover this true emblem of the orchestral repertoire. © TG/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 16, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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This new version of Tchaikovsky's famous ballet has been released hot on the heels of Disney's Nutcracker and the Four Realms, whose original music by James Newton Howard reprises and updates some of the themes from the Russian's score. Recorded by Gustavo Dudamel with Lang Lang at the piano and Andrea Bocelli singing the titles, this film's soundtrack is made to measure for these three global stars. This recording of the original material was carried out at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles in December 2013 during a Christmas celebration. The concert marked ten years of fruitful collaboration between Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. The Venezuelan maestro brings us a hedonistic vision of this German fairytale by ETA Hoffman, re-imagined by Alexandre Dumas and so wonderfully turned in to music by Tchaikovsky. It was one of the Russian's last masterpieces, coming just before the "Pathétique" Symphony which would be his musical testament. But here, all is hardly fairytale and sugar thanks to an extraordinary melodic inspiration which is brought out by a light orchestration with unique timbres, like in the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy which popularised the Celesta, an odd instrument invented in 1886 (an improbable lovechild of the glockenspiel and the piano that Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris). Dudamel is playing with dreams here. We are treated to a supple, refined conducting style that looks towards Vienna more than it does to St Petersburg, but it never loses sight of a childlike spirit that's sure to delight. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 13, 2009 | Mariinsky

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Chamber Music - Released November 29, 2019 | Signum Classics

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Classical - Released October 19, 2018 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Russian conductor Vladimir Jurowski gets most of his press from his association with the London Philharmonic Orchestra (and later, the Bavarian State Opera Orchestra), but he has also served since 2011 as chief conductor of the cumbersomely named State Academic Symphony of Russia "Evgeny Svetlanov" and knows its players well. That bodes well for this entry in the crowded marketplace of recordings of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake, and indeed everyone involved delivers handsomely. For one thing, the recording represents a fine confluence of the talents of musicians and engineers; the precise instrumental work of the orchestra is matched by clean transparency from the audiophile PentaTone label, working (at two sessions, a year apart, it should be noted) at Moscow's Rachmaninov Hall. And it's hard to avoid the feeling that this music is Jurowski's bread and butter, for all his forays into Western music. He is brisk but elegant, never too fast, and making you feel like he's rushing you through the big tunes (all of which are here in this 1877 original version, just in a slightly different order from what you may be used to). And he seems to have singlehandedly brought the brasses of the ensemble formerly known as the USSR State Symphony Orchestra up to the international A-list. Sample the sequence of ethnic dances in Act 3 for numerous demonstrations of how he gets the elusive clean but gentle sound out of his brasses. Everything's just delightful, down to the packaging of the CD version, which includes, charmingly, a foldable swan. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released April 25, 2006 | Vanguard Classics

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Classical - Released October 18, 2013 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica
Tchaikovsky's final opera was the one-act lyric drama Iolanta, which was planned as a companion piece to the Nutcracker. However, the immensely popular ballet eclipsed it, and today the opera is rarely performed or recorded outside Russia. Yet this live concert performance on Deutsche Grammophon will certainly bring the work greater attention worldwide, thanks to the star power of Anna Netrebko, who has performed the role of the blind princess in Salzburg and Baden-Baden, making it a vehicle for her unique talents. She is joined by a strong Russian cast, which includes Sergei Skorokhodov as Count Vaudémont, Alexey Markov as Robert, and Vitalij Kowaljow as King René, and the orchestral support of Emmanuel Villaume and the Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra lends the performance rich tone colors and fine details. While Netrebko's name recognition is the chief reason most western listeners will notice this recording, her singing provides the best reason to hear it. Netrebko's commitment to making this opera better known -- indeed, making it her own -- is reflected in her passionate performance, which is immediate and thrilling, and she imbues the music with intense emotion that is moving and memorable. The audio is exceptional, even by Deutsche Grammophon's high standards, so the orchestra's sonorities, dominated by woodwinds, are reproduced with vibrant sound. But above all, the audio gives Netrebko presence and warmth, so this is required listening for all of her fans and curious newcomers. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 1, 1979 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Symphonic Music - Released June 5, 2012 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Full Operas - Released September 4, 2015 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released February 10, 2014 | Mariinsky

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Classical - Released January 20, 2017 | Onyx Classics

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Symphonic Music - Released August 28, 2015 | Live from Orchestra Hall

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Classical - Released March 24, 2014 | Warner Classics International

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