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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | Warner Classics

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Ballets - Released November 2, 2018 | BR-Klassik

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Classical - Released October 19, 2018 | Mariinsky

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Stravinsky's historical status in Russia today is rather ambiguous. The young Russian composer left his native country shortly before the Revolution of October 1917 to care for his wife in Switzerland and didn’t return until 1962. He was welcomed triumphantly, but almost like a composer who was foreign to his own country. In the meantime, Stravinsky had become French, then American, turning his back on Soviet politics by becoming one of the main figures in Western musical composition. Following the collapse of the communist system and the emergence of today's Russia, Stravinsky's music gradually became part of the repertoire of Russian orchestras, as did the work of national treasures such as Tchaikovsky or Shostakovich. Here Valery Gergiev offers us the colourful original version of Petrushka (1911), with its large orchestra and a meter that had not yet been standardized by the subsequent revisions made by the composer. The poetry of the circus prevails here, and the accomplished virtuosos of the excellent Mariinsky Orchestra wonderfully restore the popular flavour of Stravinsky's music. The musical language is completely different in Playing cards, the ballet that the Russian composer wrote in the United States for dancer and choreographer George Balanchine in 1936. This came at the height of Stravinsky’s neoclassical period, that dates back to his 1920 ballet Pulcinella. Though in a way, was Petrushka not a "neoclassical" ballet too? Although the language is different, the parodic meaning, which we so often find in Stravinsky’s world, is present in both works; the citations being from popular origins in Petrushka (Wood leg for example, a song made famous by Dranem in 1908) as well as learned origins in Playing Cards, which merrily mixes The Barber of Seville by Rossini with Symphony No.5 by Beethoven and La Valse by Ravel in a pleasant potpourri. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released February 9, 2018 | Alpha

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One of the big events of 2017 was the opening of the Hamburg Philharmonie. Krzysztof Urbański and the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra gave inaugural concerts there that made a lasting impact on audiences and critics alike. On this occasion, the Polish conductor chose to record one of the works closest to his heart, The Rite of Spring: "Stravinsky invented a new language. For me, The Rite is not a score, but a painting: on each page, I see Matisse, Gauguin, the Fauve painters . . . It’s an explosion of colours, emotions, and surprises too: if you don’t know the piece, you never know what’s going to happen. It’s so suggestive that you don’t need to do all that much with the orchestra, the magic is written into the music. . . . When I conduct The Rite, I don’t think: the music penetrates your backbone, it’s inside you . . . It’s a ballet, and perhaps it’s because I was a dancer when I was younger that I can’t control my body when I hear and conduct this piece. It’s a mystical experience for me!". © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | PentaTone

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Symphonic Music - Released June 3, 2016 | BIS

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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Ever since he was a boy, Pink Floyd's bassist Roger Waters has been haunted by his father's death in the Second World War. His writing would always bear the imprint of this trauma, in particular on The Wall (1979), The Final Cut (1983) – dedicated to his father – and Amused to Death (1992). This story of a poor soldier who sold his soul to the devil must have struck a chord with him.The product of the vagaries of the Great War and the friendship between composer Igor Stravinsky (later exiled in Switzerland), the writer Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz and conductor Ernest Ansermet, The Soldier's Tale, was based on one of Afanasyev's Russian folk tales, but adapted in the Canton of Vaud by Ramuz, in whose hands it became a universal parable. Stravinsky wrote a very sparse score for seven instruments (violin, double bass, clarinet, bassoon, cornet, trombone and percussion) which demanded real virtuosity from the musicians. One hundred years after its first outing on 28 September 1918 in Lausanne, The Soldier's Tale is continuing its march across the globe. On this album, rock legend Roger Waters is the sole narrator in his own adaptation, which is based on translations by Michael Flanders and Kitty Black. He takes on the three roles himself, with seven excellent musicians from the Bridgehampton Chamber Music Festival. For Waters, this latest work is simply the next logical step, given his musical research and his political stance, in particular his support for Palestine and his fight against Trump. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | PentaTone

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Beautifully recorded and lovingly performed, Vladimir Jurowski and the Russian National Orchestra's coupling of Tchaikovsky's Third Orchestra Suite and Stravinsky's Divertimento from Le baiser de la fée has almost everything going for it. It has plenty of power -- listen to the brass in the Dies irae quote in Tchaikovsky's closing "Theme and Variations" -- plenty of enthusiasm -- listen to the woodwinds in Stravinsky's Dances Suisses -- and plenty of soul -- listen to the strings in the Elégie that opens Tchaikovsky's Suite. Jurowski has the energy to keep the tempos moving, the wit to keep the melodies bouncing, the strength to keep the lines firm, and the sense not to let the music get carried away with itself. The Russian National Orchestra has the big tone, the muscular rhythms, the brilliant colors, and the unsurpassed integrity of the great Soviet orchestras. And PentaTone's super audio sound is as good as the best recordings ever made in any format. So what's missing? In a word, refinement. Not often but too often for comfort, the brass will crack or the strings will slip or the winds will bleat or the ensemble will slide and the listener will be left wondering what happened to the first-rate performance he/she had been listening to. Although anyone who already knows and loves either Tchaikovsky's Third Suite or Stravinsky's Divertimento will want to check out this disc for its many merits, those who do may find themselves slightly let down by the end.
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Symphonic Music - Released April 26, 2013 | Sony Classical

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Leonard Bernstein's 1958 recording of Igor Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps with the New York Philharmonic is ranked among the most exciting renditions ever recorded. Indeed, Stravinsky was sufficiently impressed with this recording to exclaim, "Wow!" Additionally, it was one of the best sounding stereo versions available on a major label. Reissued by Sony for the centennial of the ballet's notorious 1913 premiere in Paris, Bernstein's legendary performance has been remastered from the original analog tapes, and though there is occasional background noise and tape hiss in exposed passages, nothing essential seems to have been lost in the transfer to digital. Some things sound better than others: the undulating chords of the Introduction to Part II have rarely sounded this full and rich, the eruptions in Glorification de l'élue are shockingly vivid, and the Danse sacrale is pungent and incisive. However, the percussion is surprisingly thin in spots in Part I, with the timpani often sounding more prominent than the bass drum, and the entire battery is somewhat underwhelming in the Danse de la terre. There are many all-digital CDs and SACDs that offer superior audio, especially in terms of a wider dynamic range and acoustic resonance, and even acknowledging the excellence of this recording for its time, Columbia didn't have the technology to match today's state-of-the-art audio. All the same, Bernstein certainly gets the orchestra to play in top form, and his elastic tempos in the slow sections and driven pacing in the fast ones keep the listener spellbound. There are no perfect recordings of Le Sacre du printemps, but it's easy to see why this one has stood the test of time and become a favorite of many.
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released May 24, 2016 | Phi

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Symphonic Music - Released November 14, 1994 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released January 9, 2019 | Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

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Classical - Released April 7, 2014 | LSO Live

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Classical - Released January 9, 2020 | SFS Media

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Classical - Released September 1, 2014 | Naxos Japan

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Symphonic Music - Released January 12, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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The rediscovery of Stravinsky's Funeral Song, from a recording made in St Petersburg in Spring 2015, was a major event. Composed over the summer of 1908 in honour of his late teacher Rimsky-Korsakov, who died in June that year, it marked a moment where Stravinsky was working at many different types of writing, looking for a personal language. The work was first performed at a memorial concert in St Petersburg in January 1909 but thereafter it disappeared without a trace: the only evidence of its existence was in accounts of the concert and the composer's own nostalgic memories of the work he saw as "the best of my works before Firebird, and the most advanced in terms of chromatic harmonies." And here at last is the world's first ever recording of it! A stunning little treasure in which we can still hear Rimsky, and also the Stravinsky of Firebird, but perhaps also still the Stravinsky of the Rite of Spring, which was still very recent, a testimony to the composer's breakneck evolution. It was in the same year, 1908, that Stravinsky interrupted his writing of Fireworks when he heard the news of Rismsky's death in order to compose his Funeral Song; the Scherzo Fantastique was the last score by the young composer that the old master would ever get to read, although he never heard it performed. With this recording, Riccardo Chilly offers us a judicious selection of four works from the composer's youth (we also find The Faun and the Shepherdess of 1906, a little cycle of three melodies with orchestra, sung in French, here with Sophie Koch) followed by the big turning point that is the Rite of Spring, with a reading which is both clear and fiery. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 9, 2015 | Sony Classical

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In describing his interpretation of Igor Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps, Teodor Currentzis emphasizes the essential Russian origins of the music, and points out the folk influences that give it its cultural resonance. This is indeed the case, since the Russian and Lithuanian folk songs that Stravinsky used have been identified, and the score overflows with themes and melodic fragments that evoke an ancient tribal culture. This is perhaps the reason so much of this elastic performance of Le Sacre du printemps feels like a melodically based interpretation, rather than a sharp, rhythmic exploration, with more attention paid to articulation and phrasing than to accentuation and rhythm. While Currentzis and Musica Aeterna produce punchy moments in the expected places, they tend to slacken in subdued sections and deprive the work of the overwhelming drive and ruthless violence it needs. Opinions may vary over Currentzis' melodic approach, mainly in Part I, though from the Glorification de l'Élue to the Danse Sacrale in Part II, the orchestra kicks into gear and produces the necessary propulsion and volatility to make a convincing ending.
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Classical - Released March 9, 1999 | High Performance

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Classical - Released September 6, 2019 | BR-Klassik

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Ballets - Released March 4, 2016 | PentaTone

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